A Plain and Easy Account of the British Ferns: Together with Their Classification, Arrangement of Genera, Structure, and Functions and a Glosssary of Technical and Other Terms

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R. Hardwicke, 1860 - Ferns - 108 pages

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Page 71 - And flapping and rapping and clapping and slapping, And curling and whirling and purling and twirling, And thumping and plumping and bumping and jumping, And dashing and flashing and splashing and clashing; And so never ending, but always descending, Sounds and motions for ever and ever are blending All at once and all o'er, with a mighty uproar, — And this way the water comes down at Lodore.
Page 9 - WILD FLOWERS WORTH NOTICE: A Selection of some of our Native Plants which are most attractive for their Beauty, Uses, or Associations. With 108 Coloured Figures by JE SOWERBY.
Page 77 - When the fern is as high as a spoon, You may sleep an hour at noon ; When the fern is as high as a ladle, You may sleep as long as you're able ; When the fern begins to look red, Then milk is good with brown bread.
Page 5 - SOWERBY'S ENGLISH BOTANY: Containing a Description and Life-size coloured Drawing of every British Plant. Edited and brought up to the Present Standard of Scientific Knowledge by T. BOSWELL (formerly SYME), LL.DFLS, &c. With Popular Descriptions of the Uses, History, and Traditions of each Plant, by Mrs. LANKESTEB, Author of " Wild Flowers Worth Notice," " The British Ferns,
Page 11 - THE BRITISH REPTILES: A Plain and Easy Account of the Lizards, Snakes, Newts, Toads, Frogs, and Tortoises indigenous to Great Britain.

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