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Their Production and Technology

BY

EUGENE H. LESLIE, PH.D.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

BOOK DEPARTMENT

The CHEMICAL CATALOG COMPANY, Inc.
19 EAST 24TH STREET, NEW YORK, U. S. A.

COPYRIGHT, 1923, BY

The CHEMICAL CATALOG COMPANY, Inc.

All Rights Reserved

Press of

J. J. Little & Ives Company

New York, U. S. A.

PREFACE

The subject matter of "Motor Fuels," and the manner in which I have presented it are consequences of several factors. First, I am firmly of the opinion that an accurate knowledge of the fundamental principles of physics, thermodynamics, and chemistry is the all important essential in engineering work. The tendency of the human. mind is to travel in ruts, and to follow the line of least resistance. In plant work this frequently results in using no end of ingenuity to perfect, in a mechanical way, an apparatus that may be inherently incorrect, or that at least can never be as efficient as that of another type. There is just one remedy for this. A project or situation should always be subjected to critical analysis on the basis of scientific facts and laws. The result of this investigation will show the feasibility of the project or the true facts of the situation, and will indicate whether or not a change is advisable. With principles and facts clearly in mind it is a relatively easy matter to give these expression in the form of an apparatus or plant. As a consequence of my philosophy, I have presented and have stressed the importance of the fundamental conceptions underlying the operations used in the production of motor fuels.

Second, a work on motor fuels will be of interest to several classes of readers. The non-technical reader will hardly be concerned with the principles of distillation, fluid-flow, or the thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons, but he may be interested in the motor-fuel situation, the general processes used in petroleum refining, the quality of motorfuels, the future possibilities of alcohol, and so on. I trust that the refinery engineer will find the presentation of the fundamental principles of distillation, fluid-flow, heat-transfer, thermal reactions of hydrocarbons, and refining, of some help, but I can scarcely hope that he will be interested by a brief discussion of general procedures, or by a somewhat more detailed description of apparatus with which he is quite familiar. On the other hand the student who knows little or nothing of refinery technology will find the general and descriptive matter essential to gaining a picture of the industry. I have therefore been confronted with the problem of either limiting the scope of the book to technology, or of making its contents miscellaneous in some measure. I have decided to widen the scope, at the risk of being accused by many readers of including elementary or extraneous material.

Third, as a reader of books I have been led to at least one conclusion with regard to writing books. This is that issues should be faced squarely. Within the limits of my ability and time I have tried to do this, realizing full well the dangers of definiteness in many instances

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