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much architectural interest as the church, which is pre-eminent in this respect among Anglo-Norman buildings. It is, like most of them, cruciform. The nave and aisles are 150 ft. in length, and there is a span of 120 ft. across the transept, the intersection of which, with the nave, is surmounted by a large square tower, not very dissimilar to that on the cathedral. “It is entirely the work of De Blois, except the front and upper story of the west end, which are of a later date, and seem to have been an effort of that great encourager of the arts to produce a style of architecture more excellent and better adapted to ecclesiastical purposes than what had hitherto been known. This style, accordingly, soon after made its appearance in a regular shape. The building before us seems to be a collection of architectural essays with respect to the disposition and form both of the essential parts and the subordinate ornaments,

Here we find the ponderous Saxon pillar, of equal dimensions in its circumference as in its length, which, however, supports an incipient pointed arch. The windowsand arches | are some of them short, with

semicircular heads, and some South of St. Cross of them immoderately long, Base of Column. and terminating like a lance. Others are in the horse-shoe form, of which the entrance into the north porch is a most curious specimen. In one place (at the angle of the south transept and chancel) we have a curious triangular arch, a species of work not at all common in any style of building. The capitals and bases of the columns alternately vary in their form as well as in their ornaments. The same circumstance is observable in the ribs of the arches, especially in the north and south aisles, some of them being plain, others profusely embellished, and in different styles, even within the same arch. Here we view almost every kind of Saxon and Norman ornament—the chevron, the billet, the hatched, the pellet, the fret, the indented, the nebule, the wavy, all superiorily executed.” These are promises of interest enough to whet the appetite for a minute examination of this very curious church. The interior has been thickly coated with whitewash, which should be removed carefully, as there are manifestly paintings beneath it, seemingly extending over the whole church. Both the aisles of the choir have been used as

chapels; both retain their piscina—that on the north side remarkable for the carved nondescripts which ornament it. There is also on the north aisle of the nave, worth noting, a handsome canopy inserted in the wall, which would seem to have surmounted the tomb of Peter de Sancta Maria, in 1295; but the occurrence of this description of canopy inserted in the north walls of churches is so frequent (it may be seen at Great Yarmouth, at Stoke Pogeis, &c.) that we are inclined to consider whether it must not have had some cere

monial purpose. There are some remnants of stained Piscina in St. Cross. glass in the great west window, but otherwise the church is bare (having probably been stripped) of this species of decoration. Rich and abundant is the variety of the old encaustic tiles, curiously disposed in patterns, and the monumental brasses are so many and fine

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-especially that of John de Campden, Master of the Hospital in 1383 - that they alone would repay a collector of “rubbings" for his pilgrimage hither. The carved work of the stalls in the choir, apparently of the early Tudor period, must not be passed unobserved; and lastly, we recommend Dr. Milner's cheap account of the Hospital, from which we have already quoted.

The visitor, on his return to the city, should leave the Hospital by the meadows on the south side, ascending the main stream of the Itchen along the ruins of the castle walls, and he will have time to mount one of the Hills of “Gwent," in order to take a general view of the city before his departure. Besides its Cathedral, College, and Hospital of St. Cross, Win

chester has much else of historic and antiquarian interest worthy of investigation, from the time of the Romans, who made it one of their principal fortified stations. It was also the capital of the kingdom of the West Saxons ; frequently the residence of our early Norman kings. The city formerly had its mint, its trea

sury, and public record High-street, Winchester.

office. In its “ Winchester" ells and bushels it gave measures for the whole kingdom. It was the seat of many parliaments. The corporation, under a charter from Henry II., hold the superintendence of the royal kitchen and laundry at coronations. Sir Christopher Wren left incomplete a palace begun on the site of the old castle. It was of course a walled city, and had four gates, one of which only remains. Its cross, apparently not well restored, is still standing in the midst of the city. Friaries for black, white, and grey coats, as well as other monastic institutions and churches, abounded in Winchester. But all these subjects may well remain for one or more other day's excursions. The curious may consult with advantage the proceedings of the meeting of the Archæological Institute, for 1845, which was held at Winchester. The volume has especial reference to the antiquities of the city. For one day's diversion, which is all that at present we cater for, enough, and more than enough, is furnished by the Hospital of St. Cross, Wykeham's College and the old Minster.

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LONDON: PUBLISHED AT THE RAILWAY CHRONICLE OFFICE,

14, Wellington-street North, Strand.-Price 2d.

PLEASURE EXCURSIONS.

HARROW,

ON THE LONDON AND BIRMINGHAM RAILWAY.

[From the Railway Chronicle.]

This Excursion, going and returning, by the Birmingham Railway, requires about three hours from the time of starting from the station. On the returr, walking to Willesden, or to Hanwell station, on the Great Western, will lengthen it to five hours at least.

[graphic][merged small]

“ The only visible church," replied Charles II., our monarch par excellence called “merry," to some divines who were disputing its existence—" The only visible church I know of, is to be found at Harrow." The royal wit has a literal physical truth; for Harrow church certainly stands most visibly on all sides to the counties of Essex and Hertford, Berks and Buckingham, Kent and Surrey; and it is especially manifest to all travellers on the London and Birmingham Railway. On that line Harrow and its neighbourhood are the first objects occurring out of the metropolis which deserve an especial pilgrimage to them. The Harrow station is about a mile and a half distant from the church. The walk is an extremely agreeable one across green meadows—the ascent being gradual until we reach the foot of the hill, when it becomes very steep. The church is the main feature of the place, as it has been from all time, conferring on it its name. It is not deficient in interest in itself, and is well worthy of an archæologist's minute inspection; from all points the church and the foliage, about and below it, make picturesque combinations, the beauty of which must strike every eye.

It is not our vocation to enter very fully upon a topographical history of Harrow, or we might give a pretty clear one, at least from the time of our Saxon forefathers. Its name guarantees its age for nine centuries at least, and moreover Harrow-on-the-Hill is the old descriptive Saxon name for “church on the hill.” The name was anciently written "Herges," probably a derivative of the Saxon Hearge, Herge or Herige, which, translated, means church. The antiquity of the spot is further and more precisely vouched for, by that unique record, William the Conqueror's 'Doomsday Book.' In it the manor of Harrow is returned as being held by Archbishop Lanfranc. Notice is made that there was land to seventy ploughs, -especially that of John de Campden, Master of the Hospital in 1383 - that they alone would repay a collector of “rubbings" for his pilgrimage hither. The carved work of the stalls in the choir, apparently of the early Tudor period, must not be passed unobserved; and lastly, we recommend Dr. Milner's cheap account of the Hospital, from which we have already quoted.

The visitor, on his return to the city, should leave the Hospital by the meadows on the south side, ascending the main stream of the Itchen along the ruins of the castle walls, and he will have time to mount one of the Hills of “Gwent,” in order to take a general view of the city before his departure. Besides its Cathedral, College, and Hospital of St. Cross, Win

chester has much else of historic and antiquarian interest worthy of investigation, from the time of the Romans, who made it one of their principal fortified stations. It was also the capital of the kingdom of the West Saxons ; frequently the residence of our early Norman kings. The city formerly had its mint, its trea

sury, and public record High-street, Winchester.

office. In its “ Winchester" ells and bushels it gave measures for the whole kingdom. It was the seat of many parliaments. The corporation, under a charter from Henry II., hold the superintendence of the royal kitchen and laundry at coronations. Sir Christopher Wren left incomplete a palace begun on the site of the old castle. It was of course a walled city, and had four gates, one of which only remains. Its cross, apparently not well restored, is still standing in the midst of the city. Friaries for black, white, and grey coats, as well as other monastic institutions and churches, abounded in Winchester. But all these subjects may well remain for one or more other day's excursions. The curious may consult with advantage the proceedings of the meeting of the Archæological Institute, for 1845, which was held at Winchester. The volume has especial reference to the antiquities of the city. For one day's diversion, which is all that at present we cater for, enough, and more than enough, is furnished by the Hospital of St. Cross, Wykeham's College and the Old Minster.

[graphic]

LONDON: PUBLISHED AT THE RAILWAY CHRONICLE OFFICE,

14, Wellington-street North, Strand.—Price 2d.

PLEASURE EXCURSIONS.

HARROW,

ON THE LONDON AND BIRMINGHAM RAILWAY.

[From the Railway Chronicle.]

This Excursion, going and returning, by the Birmingham Railway, requires about three hours from the time of starting from the station. On the return, walking to Willesden, or to Hanwell station, on the Great Western, will lengthen it to five hours at least.

[graphic][merged small]

“ The only visible church," replied Charles II., our monarch par excellence called “merry," to some divines who were disputing its existence—" The only visible church I know of, is to be found at Harrow.The royal wit has a literal physical truth; for Harrow church certainly stands most visibly on all sides to the counties of Essex and Hertford, Berks and Buckingham, Kent and Surrey; and it is especially manifest to all travellers on the London and Birmingham Railway. On that line Harrow and its neighbourhood are the first objects occurring out of the metropolis which deserve an especial pilgrimage to them. The Harrow station is about a mile and a half distant from the church. The walk is an extremely agreeable one across green meadows—the ascent being gradual until we reach the foot of the hill, when it becomes very steep. The church is the main feature of the place, as it has been from all time, conferring on it its name. It is not deficient in interest in itself, and is well worthy of an archæologist's minute inspection; from all points the church and the foliage, about and below it, make picturesque combinations, the beauty of which must strike every eye.

It is not our vocation to enter very fully upon a topographical history of Harrow, or we might give a pretty clear one, at least from the time of our Saxon forefathers. Its name guarantees its age for nine centuries at least, and moreover Harrow-on-the-Hill is the old descriptive Saxon name for “church on the hill.” The name was anciently written "Herges,” probably a derivative of the Saxon Hearge, Herge or Herige, which, translated, means church. The antiquity of the spot is further and more precisely vouched for, by that unique record, William the Conqueror's 'Doomsday Book.' In it the manor of Harrow is returned as being held by Archbishop Lanfranc. Notice is made that there was land to seventy ploughs,

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