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with the towing bridge, there are three of them-have often been painted; best of all, perhaps, by that erratic genius Turner, whose picture, executed in his younger days, is at Cashiobury, near Watford, a place and house we have not forgotten in our excursions. We must notice that this spot is called Cowey Stakes, and has the tradition of being the place where Cæsar crossed the Thames in pursuit of Cassibelaun. Bede and the old chroniclers are the authority rather than Cæsar himself, who only mentions making the passage at about 80 miles from the sea. Huge oak stakes, shod with iron, have been found in the river hereabouts, the wood very black, and hard enough to turn an axe.

We ascend the towing-path to the lower bridge, close at whose base stand the gates of Oatlands, now shut against all comers. The house is rarely inhabited, and it is hardly possible to conceive what satisfaction the owner can have in curtailing the privilege of passing through the park, which has been long enjoyed by the public. Some of the trees, especially the cedars and firs, which flourish in this park, are well grown and handsome, and the walk on the high ground of the park overlooking the river used to be extremely pleasant. The house itself, which was built in the last century on the ashes of one older than Henry the Eighth's days, has no attractions. The grotto, remarkable for its size and cost, which was built in the last century, when the Duke of Newcastle was the owner, is still in existence. This Oatlands was a royal park, of which Henry the Eighth became possessed in exchange for Tandridge.

The village of Walton is about five minutes' walk from the bridge. If the tourist has not already warned Mrs. Mary Copp of his advent, whose very comfortable inn stands retiringly at the top of the road leading to the bridge, let him at once order his dinner, and whilst it is preparing, he may examine the curiosities of Walton church. It is rather a spacious building. Its most remarkable objects are, John Selwyn's monumental brass, which represents him seated on the back of a stag, and plunging a knife into its throat. The story is, that, when keeper of Oatlands, he was hunting in the presence of Queen Elizabeth, and overtaking the stag, he sprung on to it from his horse and killed it. Roubiliac has a large and ostentatious monument to

Walton Church. commemorate Richard Viscount Shannon. The female figure has a kind of unsculpturesque beauty of its own, and its execution has that exquisite finish, proper to all Roubiliac's works. In the vestry is kept what is called a scold's bridle—an old iron machine for preventing utterance by confining the tongue. William

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Scold's Bridle, in Walton Church.

“ Chester presents Walton with a bridle

Lilly, the astrologer, who lived at the adjoining village of Hersham, is buried here. We can but mention in a sentence, as objects worthy of inspection in the neighbourhood of Walton, the orangeries, and Leonardo da Vinci's small cartoon sketch for his “ Last Supper," at Burnwood House—the old house at Ashley Park, said, but without any known authority, to have been a residence of Cardinal Wolsey, and the gardens at Painshill, near Cobham. All these are far south of the route we have taken, and they are not to be seen without special leave of their owners.

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LONDON: PUBLISHED AT THE RAILWAY CHRONICLE OFFICE,

14, Wellington-street North, Strand. Price ld.

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THE TOWNS, VILLAGES, CHURCHES, MANSIONS, PARKS, STATIONS, BRIDGES,

VIADUCTS, TUNNELS, CUTTINGS, GRADIENTS, &c.
The Scenery and its Natural History, the Antiquities and their Historical

Associations, &c. passed by the Line of Railway,
WITH HUNDREDS OF ILLUSTRATIONS,

CONSTITUTING A NOVEL AND COMPLETE COMPANION FOR THE RAILWAY CARRIAGE.

LONDON TO KINGSTON AND HAMPTON COURT, price ld.
LONDON TO WOKING AND GUILDFORD, in cover, price 4d.

Also publishing, PLEASURE EXCURSIONS,

Being Guides for DAY'S EXCURSIONS to

KINGSTON AND HAMPTON COURT,
ESHER,—GUILDFORD,—WOKING,—WINCHESTER,

SILCHESTER, PORCHESTER, &c.
On the SOUTH-WESTERN RAIL WAY.

REPRINTED FROM THE

Railway Chronicle,

Which is published every Saturday, in time for the Morning Mails, price 6d. stamped

to go free by post.

CHARTS and PLEASURE EXCURSIONS

POR THE
BIRMINGHAM,

GREAT WESTERN,
SOUTH-WESTERN, SOUTH-EASTERN,

And the EASTERN COUNTIES,

PLEASURE EXCURSIONS.

GUILDFORD,

ON THE SOUTH-WESTERN RAILWAY.

[From the Rallway Chronicle.]

A whole day is not too long to make this Excursion completely. We therefore advise the tourist to start by one of the earliest trains and breakfast at Guildford. Those who are indisposed to take a loitering walk of three miles, which is involved in adopting the course suggested in this paper, may in that case make a very pleasant acquaintance with the town of Guildford on an afternoon.

the tourist to starthone of the

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For a day's excursion, a week's visit, or a year's residence, Guildford is a perfect spot. Pondering over its merits, after lengthened acquaintance, we are unable to qualify them by a single drawback, except that its river does not flow quite vivaciously enough to satisfy us. Comparing Guildford with any other market town in England, we know of none which has superior attractions to it. Extreme beauty of sitehills, valleys, leas and foliage, and all the infinite variety of vegetation from its diversity of soil-chalk, sand and clay; a running stream, though its current is sluggish; picturesque buildings; a history respectable in an old age of many centuries, and veritably illustrated with antiquities; a ruined fortress, ruined chapels (fighting and prayers, types of

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