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with stooped to measure the cast, which the King espying, knew, and had seen her wear, and therewithal spurned away the bowl, and said, It may be so, but then am I deceived; and so broke up the game. This thing thus carried, was not perceived for all this of many, but of some few it was. For the King, resorting to his chamber, showing some discontentment in his countenance, found means to break this matter to the lady, who, with good and evident proof how the knight came by the jewel, satisfied the King so effectually, that this more confirmed the King's opinion of her truth than himself at the first would have expected.”

During the “sweating sickness” Anne was sent for security to Hever, a place likely enough to encourage the epidemic. “As touching your abode at Hever," writes Henry, you know what aire doth best suit you; but I would it were come to that, thereto if it please God, that neither of us need care for that, for I assure you I think it long." The love-letters which Henry addressed to her at Hever are the last positive evidences we find of Anne's connexion with the spot, and with a short extract from one of them we take our leave of Hever: “In order to remind you of my affection, and because I cannot be in your presence, I send you the thing which comes nearest that is possible, that is to say, my picture, and the whole device, which you already know of, set in bracelets, wishing myself in their place when it pleases you."

Near to the castle on the north-west is an old farm house, called “Polebrooks,” which is worth walking to see for its picturesqueness. If the promised accommodation at the “Royal Harry” at Hever was not sufficiently tempting, then the tourist may take a pretty green lane walk about two miles further on to Edenbridge, where he will meet with treatment a few degrees more civilized; within a mile of this village the railway has a station.

[graphic][merged small]

LONDON: PUBLISHED AT THE RAILWAY CARONICLE OFFICE,

14, Wellington-street North, Strand.

PLEASURE EXCURSIONS.

CROYDON,

ON THE CROYDON, BRIGHTON AND SOUTH-EASTERN RAILWAYS.

[From the Railway Chronicle.)

This Excursion, going and returning, to Croydon only, requires about four hours from

the time of starting from the station.

[graphic][merged small]

THE earliest railway for public traffic in England was one passing from Merstham to Wandsworth, through Croydon; a small single line, on which a miserable team of lean mules or donkeys, some thirty years ago, might be seen crawling at the rate of four miles in the hour, with small trucks of stone and lime behind them. It was commenced in 1801, opened in 1803, and the men of science of that day-we cannot say that the respectable name of Stephenson was not among them—tested its capabilities, and found that one horse could draw some 35 tons at six miles in the hour, and then, with prophetic wisdom, declared that railways could never be worked profitably. The old Croydon Railway is no longer used. The genius loci must look with wonder on the gigantic offspring of the little railway, which has swallowed up its own sire. Lean mules no longer crawl leisurely along the little rails with trucks of stone, through Croydon, once perchance during the day, but the whistle and the rush of the locomotive, and the whirr of the atmospheric, are now heard all day long. Not a few loads of lime, but all London and its contents, by comparison-men, women, children, horses, dogs, oxen, sheep, pigs, carriages, merchandise, food-would seem now-a-days to be passing through Croydon, for day after day more than one hundred journeys with stooped to measure the cast, which the King espying, knew, and had seen her wear, and therewithal spurned away the bowl, and said, It may be so, but then am I deceived; and so broke up the game. This thing thus carried, was not perceived for all this of many, but of some few it was. For the King, resorting to his chamber, showing some discontentment in his countenance, found means to break this matter to the lady, who, with good and evident proof how the knight came by the jewel, satisfied the King so effectually, that this more confirmed the King's opinion of her truth than himself at the first would have expected."

During the “ sweating sickness" Anne was sent for security to Hever, a place likely enough to encourage the epidemic. “ As touching your abode at Hever," writes Henry, you know what aire doth best suit you; but I would it were come to that, thereto if it please God, that neither of us need care for that, for I assure you I think it long." The love-letters which Henry addressed to her at Hever are the last positive evidences we find of Anne's connexion with the spot, and with a short extract from one of them we take our leave of Hever: “In order to remind you of my affection, and because I cannot be in your presence, I send you the thing which comes nearest that is possible, that is to say, my picture, and the whole device, which you already know of, set in bracelets, wishing myself in their place when it pleases you."

Near to the castle on the north-west is an old farm house, called “Polebrooks,” which is worth walking to see for its picturesqueness. If the promised accommodation at the “Royal Harry” at Hever was not sufficiently tempting, then the tourist may take a pretty green lane walk about two miles further on to Edenbridge, where he will meet with treatment a few degrees more civilized; within a mile of this village the railway has a station.

[graphic][merged small]

LONDON: PUBLISHED AT THE RAILWAY CARONICLE OFFICE,

14, Wellington-street North, Strand.

PLEASURE EXCURSIONS.

CROYDON,

ON THE CROYDON, BRIGHTON AND SOUTH-EASTERN RAILWAYS.

[From the Railway Chronicle.]

This Excursion, going and returning, to Croydon only, requires about four hours from

the time of starting from the station.

[graphic][merged small]

The earliest railway for public traffic in England was one passing from Merstham to Wandsworth, through Croydon; a small single line, on which a miserable team of lean mules or donkeys, some thirty years ago, might be seen crawling at the rate of four miles in the hour, with small trucks of stone and lime behind them. It was commenced in 1801, opened in 1803, and the men of science of that day,we cannot say that the respectable name of Stephenson was not among them-tested its capabilities, and found that one horse could draw some 35 tons at six miles in the hour, and then, with prophetic wisdom, declared that railways could never be worked profitably. The old Croydon Railway is no longer used. The genius loci must look with wonder on the gigantic offspring of the little railway, which has swallowed up its own sire. Lean mules no longer crawl leisurely along the little rails with trucks of stone, through Croydon, once perchance during the day, but the whistle and the rush of the locomotive, and the whirr of the atmospheric, are now heard all day long. Not a few loads of lime, but all London and its contents, by comparison-men, women, children, horses, dogs, oxen, sheep, pigs, carriages, merchandise, food—would seem now-a-days to be passing through Croydon, for day after day more than one hundred journeys

[graphic]

TERMINUS OF THE SOUTH-EASTERN AND BRIGHTON RAILWAYS AT LONDON BRIDGE.

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