The Autobiography of William Jerdan: With His Literary, Political and Social Reminiscences and Correspondence During the Last Fifty Years, Volume 1

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A. Hall, Virtue & Company, 1852 - Authors, English - 444 pages
 

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Page 125 - Alas ! alas ! Why, all the souls that were, were forfeit once; And He that might the vantage best have took, Found out the remedy: How would you be, If he, which is the top of judgment, should But judge you as you are? O, think on that; And mercy then will breathe within your lips, Like man new made.
Page 116 - Not a drum was heard, not a funeral note, As his corse to the rampart we hurried ; Not a soldier discharged his farewell shot O'er the grave where our hero we buried. We buried him darkly at dead of night, The sods with our bayonets turning ; By the struggling moonbeam's misty light And the lantern dimly burning. No useless coffin enclosed his breast...
Page 18 - THE BAPTISMAL FONT ; an Exposition of the Nature and Obligations of Christian Baptism. With an Appendix.
Page 216 - ... your feet, the sun gives a farewell parting gleam, and the birds ' Stir the faint note, and but attempt to sing.' " Then again, when the heavens wear a more gloomy aspect, the winds whistle, and the waters spout, I see you in the well-known...
Page 19 - Sweet Teviot! on thy silver tide The glaring bale-fires blaze no more ; No longer steel-clad warriors ride Along thy wild and willow'd shore ; Where'er thou wind'st, by dale or hill, All, all is peaceful, all is still, As if thy waves, since Time was born. Since first they roll'd upon the Tweed, Had only heard the shepherd's reed, Nor started at the bugle-horn.
Page 8 - Time rolls his ceaseless course. The race of yore, Who danced our infancy upon their knee, And told our marvelling boyhood legends store, Of their strange ventures happ'd by land or sea, How are they blotted from the things that be ! How few, all weak and wither'd of their force, Wait on the verge of dark eternity, Like stranded wrecks, the tide returning hoarse, To sweep them from our sight ! Time rolls his ceaseless course.
Page 224 - Nature delights me in every form, I am just now painting her in her most lugubrious dress for my own amusement, describing "Winter as it presents itself.
Page 4 - One of the best historical, archaeological, and geographical compilations that has appeared." WEEKLY NEWS. — "We can safely recommend it to the perusal of our readers as the most useful work which has yet appeared upon the subject it embraces.
Page 224 - I am just now painting her in her most lugubrious dress, for my own amusement, describing winter as it presents itself. After my first proposal of the subject, I sing of Winter, and his gelid reign, Nor let a rhyming insect of the Spring Deem it a barren theme. To me 'tis full Of manly charms ; to me, who court the shade, — Whom the gay seasons suit not, and who shun The glare of Summer. Welcome, kindred glooms ! Drear, awful, wintry horrors, welcome all I &c.
Page 12 - A tale powerfully told, and with a good moral strongly enforced." — Kentish Gazette. " This is one of the most original, peculiar, racy, and interesting books we have ever read." — Cincinnati Gazette. • ' " It is the fervour of style, the freshness of illustration, the depth of true feeling present in every page, that gives these tales a charm peculiar to themselves." — New York Evening Post, Edited by WC Bryant.

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