Moral and Political Dialogues: With Letters on Chivalry and Romance, Volume 2

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Page 309 - Canon laws proceeded from, and had perpetual reference to, an absolute spiritual monarch, and were formed upon the genius, and did acknowledge the authority of, the civil laws, — the issue of civil despotism, — I say, whoever considers this, will be inclined to think that the Crown contrived this interim from the use the Canon law was of to the extension of the prerogative. However, It is certain, that the succeeding monarchs, Elizabeth, James, and Charles...
Page 311 - I have said, a good king will frame all his actions to be according to the Law; yet is hee not bound thereto but of his good will, and for good example-giving to his subjects...
Page 324 - Law itself, which MARCIUS had to the Greek tongue, who thought it a mockery to learn that language, the masters whereof lived in bondage under others.
Page 25 - ... sound knowledge of the Greek and Latin tongues, are thereto no less skilful in the Spanish, Italian, and French, or in some one of them, it resteth not in me...
Page 63 - Harrison, after enumerating the queen's palaces, adds, "But what shall I need to take upon me to repeat all, and tell what houses the queen's majesty hath? Sith all is hers; and when it pleaseth her in the summer season to recreate herself abroad, and view the estate of the country, and hear the complaints of her poor commons injured by her unjust officers or their substitutes, every nobleman's house is...
Page 311 - blafphemy in a creature to difpute what the deity may do, " fo it is prefumption and fedition in a fubject to difpute *' what a king may do in the height of his power...
Page 323 - Where Mr. Holborne," says justice Berkley, " supposed a fundamental policy in the creation of the frame of this kingdom, that in case the monarch of England should be inclined to exact from his subjects at his pleasure, he should be restrained, for that he could have nothing from them, but upon a common consent in parliament ; he is utterly mistaken herein.
Page 33 - Essex, his hearse being attended by poets, and mournful elegies and poems with the pens that wrote them thrown into his tomb.
Page 45 - Countries) are far under the fame : and if the late queen would have believed her men of war, as she did her scribes, we had in her time beaten that great empire in pieces, and made their kings kings of figs and oranges, as in old times.
Page 302 - Proteftant doctrine. AND thus unhappily arofe in the church of England, that pernicious fyftem of divine indefeafible right of kings : broached indeed by the clergy, but not from thofe corrupt and temporizing views to which it has been imputed. The authority of thofe venerable men, from whom it was derived, gave it a firm and...

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