The Iliad [of Homer].

Front Cover
[J.B.] Lippincott [& Company,], 1883 - 424 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
930
4 stars
598
3 stars
438
2 stars
166
1 star
62

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - tess_schoolmarm - www.librarything.com

At long last! The Illiad by Homer DIfficult to rate a literary epic. However, the entire book takes place in the 10th and last year of the Trojan War. Achilles’ wrath at Agamemnon for taking his war ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jrissman - www.librarything.com

Stanley Lombardo's translation of Homer's Iliad is wonderful and very readable, better evoking the grittiness and rage of warfare than most other translations. I think of it as the "Vietnam War ... Read full review

All 11 reviews »

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 69 - Sheer o'er the crystal battlements : from morn To noon he fell, from noon to dewy eve, A summer's day ; and with the setting sun Dropt from the zenith like a falling star...
Page 252 - A wise physician skill'd our wounds to heal, Is more than armies to the public weal.
Page 159 - Like leaves on trees the race of man is found, Now green in youth, now withering on the ground ; Another race the following spring supplies, They fall successive, and successive rise: So generations in their course decay, So flourish these, when those are past away.
Page 269 - Could all our care elude the gloomy grave, Which claims no less the fearful than the brave, For lust of fame I should not vainly dare In fighting fields, nor urge thy soul to war. But since, alas ! ignoble age must come, Disease, and death's inexorable doom, The life, which others pay, let us bestow, And give to fame what we to nature owe ; Brave though we fall, and honour'd if we live, Or let us glory gain, or glory give!
Page 168 - O thou! whose glory fills the ethereal throne, And all ye deathless powers! protect my son! Grant him, like me, to purchase just renown, To guard the Trojans, to defend the crown, Against his country's foes the war to wage, And rise the Hector of the future age! So when triumphant from successful toils Of heroes slain he bears the reeking spoils, Whole hosts may hail him with deserved acclaim, And say, 'This chief transcends his father's fame.' While pleased amidst the general shouts of Troy, His...
Page 406 - He bindeth up the waters in his thick clouds; and the cloud is not rent under them.
Page 435 - On the other side, Incensed with indignation, Satan stood Unterrified, and like a comet burn'd, That fires the length of Ophiuchus huge In the Arctic sky, and from his horrid hair Shakes pestilence and war.
Page 14 - The critic eye, that microscope of wit, Sees hairs and pores, examines bit by bit : How parts relate to parts, or they to whole, The body's harmony, the beaming soul, Are things which Kuster, Burman, Wasse shall see, When man's whole frame is obvious to a flea.
Page 169 - ... condition of our birth. No force can then resist, no flight can save; All sink alike, the fearful and the brave. No more — but hasten to thy tasks at home, There guide the spindle, and direct the loom : Me glory summons to the martial scene, The field of combat is the sphere for men. Where heroes war, the foremost place I claim, The first in danger as the first in fame.
Page 219 - Yet hear one word, and lodge it in thy heart: No more molest me on Atrides' part: Is it for him these tears are taught to flow, For him these sorrows? for my mortal foe? A generous friendship no cold medium knows, Burns with one love, with one resentment glows; One should our interests and our passions be; My friend must hate the man that injures me.

Bibliographic information