The Florist and Pomologist: A Pictorial Monthly Magazine of Flowers, Fruits, and General Horticulture ...

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Published at the "Journal of Horticulture" Office, 1878 - Floriculture

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Page 32 - APPLES.—By a careful analysis it has been found that apples contain a larger amount of phosphorus, or brain-food, than any other fruit or vegetable; and on this account they are very important to sedentary men, who work their brains rather than their muscles. They also contain the acids which are needed...
Page 32 - ... mostly in their juices, are of course mostly soluble, and as their solid material is mostly woody fibre, and indigestible, they also furnish waste, which is very important to sedentary men, inclined as they are to constipation. They also contain the acids which are needed every day, especially in sedentary men, the action of whose liver is sluggish, to eliminate effete matters, which, if retained in the system, produce inaction of the brain, and indeed of the whole system, causing jaundice, sleepiness,...
Page 120 - ... other two shall stand by and stop him when they do not agree, one putting down on paper the number of points allotted to each bloom as they are decided upon, and adding up the total number of points given to each stand or exhibit. " Three points should be given for high-class blooms ; two for medium; one for those not so good, but not bad enough to cut out ; and one or even two extra points for a very superior bloorn.
Page 120 - Form, shall imply : petals abundant and of good substance, regularly and gracefully arranged within a circular outline, and having a well-formed centre. " Size shall imply that the bloom is a full-size representative specimen of the variety. " Brightness shall include : freshness, brilliancy, and purity of colour.
Page 148 - ... dry air is not so good, as it absorbs the moisture and aroma from the fruit, injures its flavor, and causes it to wilt and. shrivel up. After being kept in such a room a few days they will begin to turn, and some of them will mellow ; then they should be sold or used befoie they soften. The boxes, barrels, or whatever they may be placed in, should be covered with papers to exclude the light and prevent the escape of the aroma. Care should also be exercised to avoid placing them so deep in barrels...
Page 186 - O'er rustling fallen leaves doth blow ; In gold and purple robed, the trees The fulness of Thy beauty show. 193. HYMN OF WINTER. LM ' T is Winter now- ; the fallen snow Has left the heavens all coldly clear ; Through leafless boughs the sharp winds blow, And all the earth lies dead and drear.
Page 147 - Pear-growers agree that all kinds of Pears should be picked while green and ripened in the house, but at just what time they should be picked, and just how they should be handled to ripen them, are subjects on which there is much diversity of opinion. But in order that we may intelligently understand this subject, let us see what this ripening process is, and what * From a Prize Essay, read at a Meeting or the Massachusetts' Horticultural Society, January 12, 1878.
Page 148 - The largest and ripest should lie picked first — as soon as the windfalls will ripen and be good — and the smaller and greener ones should be left to receive the additional sap which the earlier ones would have appropriated. Sometimes one side of a tree will be much earlier than the other, in which case the earliest side should be picked first. This early picking should be ripened off at once by the process already described, only observing that the greener the fruit the higher temperature it...
Page 148 - ... them into market early, before the bulk of the crop is received, and we can keep a part of the crop until quite late and sell when the rush is over, thereby obtaining better prices. Splendid specimens for exhibition purposes may be obtained by leaving a few of the largest and fairest specimens on the tree and picking all others early ; then, when fully grown, pick and ripen between papers or blankets, as the weather and degree of ripeness they have attained on the tree may require. A great many...
Page 147 - A good pear may be ripened so as to be solid, juicy, niid sweet, with a good rich color to its skin, or it may be made corky, insipid, and rotten at the core ; or again it may be shrivelled, sour, and unattractive, and these different conditions may all be obtained the same season, and from fruit grown on the same tree. This being the case, the importance of proper ripening will readily be seen. "While different varieties may require slightly different treatment, owing to their individual characteristics...

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