The Florist and Pomologist: A Pictorial Monthly Magazine of Flowers, Fruits, and General Horticulture ...

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Published at the "Journal of Horticulture" Office, 1880 - Floriculture

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Page 55 - ... of energy expended, and the electric arc should be of sufficient brilliancy to give a good effect for the power employed. Experience in electric illumination has established a form and size of machine both convenient and suitable for the attainment of economical results, viz., the medium dynamo-electric machine, which, if applied to a suitable regulator, produces fully 6,000 candle-power of diffused light with an expenditure of 4 horsepower. The experiments already referred to show that the most...
Page 184 - ... inequality of every kind. 3. The breadth of the petals should be amply sufficient to prevent any interstices being seen between them, so long as the flower retains its freshness. 4. There should be exact uniformity between the outline of the cup, and the outline of the upper margin of the petal, which should form an arc or curve, whose radius is equal to half the diameter, or whole depth of the flower.
Page 54 - exposed to both sources of light showed a decided superiority in vigor over all the others, and the green of the leaf was of a dark rich hue." Heliotropism was observed in the young mustard plants. Electric light appeared to be about half as effective as daylight. A great difficulty experienced in this experiment was the film of moisture which condenses on greenhouse roofs at night and obstructs the passage of light.
Page 55 - ... application of electric light in front of fruit walls, in orchards, and in kitchen gardens, to save the fruit bud at the time of setting. Considering the evident power of the electric light to form chlorophyll, there seemed reason to suppose that its action would also in the case of ripening fruit resemble that of the sun, and that saccharine matter, and more especially the aromatic constituents, would be produced. To test this opinion practically, several plants of early strawberries in pots...
Page 184 - It should be composed of six petals, three inner, aud three outer, which should all be of the same height, and have such a form as will enable them to preserve this circular outline; their edges being even, stiff, and smooth; and their surfaces free from shoulder, or inequality of every kind. 3. The breadth of the petals should be amply sufficient to prevent any interstices being seen between them, so long as the flower retains its freshness.
Page 184 - He devised four rules to detect perfection in florists' tulips: 1. Every tulip, when in its greatest perfection, should be circular in its outline throughout; its depth should be equal to half its width across from the top, or highest point, of one petal to the tip of the other immediately opposite. 2. It should be composed of six petals, three inner and three outer, which should all be of the same height, and have such a form as will enable them to preserve this...
Page 40 - Now dark and dim, as through a glass, are God and truth beheld ; Then shall we see as face to face, and God shall be unveil'd.
Page 54 - ... however, that the electric arc was not so placed as to give out its light to the greatest advantage. The nights were cold, and the plants under experiment were for the most part of a character to require a hot moist atmosphere ; the glass thus became covered very thickly with moisture, obstructing thereby the action of the light, besides which the electric light had to traverse the glass of its own lamp. Notwithstanding these drawbacks, the electric light clearly formed chlorophyll and its derivatives...
Page 55 - ... clearly proved that although the temperature on the ground did not differ materially within the range of the electric light and beyond it, the radiant effect of the light was such as to prevent frost entirely within its range. For this reason I anticipate the useful application of electric light in front of fruit walls, in orchards, and in kitchen gardens, to save the fruit bud at the time of setting. Considering the evident power of the electric light to form chlorophyll, there seemed reason...
Page 54 - ... These experiments are not only instructive in proving the sufficiency of electric light alone to promote vegetation, but they also go to prove the important fact that diurnal repose is not necessary for the life of plants, although the duration of the experiments is too limited perhaps to furnish that proof in an absolute manner. It may; however, be argued from analogy, that such repose is not necessary, seeing that crops grow and ripen in a wonderfully short space of time in the northern regions...

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