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An increase of $4,752 is requested for 1969 to meet the cost of within-grade promotions and other changes falling due in that year, authorized by Public Law 763 under the wage board

system, for employees compensated under that act. Within-grade promotions authorized by the Classification Act of 1949,

as amended, for employees compensated under that act_ Pay above the stated annual rate allotment-increase--

Normally, it is necessary to provide, annually, for one additional day's pay above the regular 260-basic workdays per year, since usually the extra day falls on a basic workday (Monday to Friday). This allotment is determined by deducting 52 Saturdays and 52 Sundays from the total of 365 calendar days in a normal year. Last year (leap year), 1 additional day fell on a Saturday and the other on a Sunday, resulting in the elimination of the need for this allotment for 1968. For 1969, the additional day falls on a basic workday, necessitating the need for restoration of this

allotment for 1969. Increased pay costs due to Public Law 90–206 "Federal Salary Act of 1967", approved Dec. 16, 1967---

Increases authorized by this act went into effect Oct. 8, 1967. The cost for the fiscal year 1968 amounts to $1,100. Due to delay in filling 5 new jobs allowed for 1968, it is possible to absorb this cost for 1968. However, since such savings will not recur in 1969, it is necessary to request for 1969 the full annual cost of $1,580

for next year. Payment to employees' life insurance fund-increased from $2,130 to $3,060

This item is required to cover the cost of the Government's payment to employees' life insurance fund required by Public Law 598, 83d Congress. The increase of $930 is due to additional costs resulting from enactment of Public Law 90–206, which provides for additional amounts of insurance for all Federal employees and establishes a new minimum insurance coverage of $10,000 for those

employees whose annual basic salary is $8,000 or less. Contribution to retirement fund-increased from $45,100 to $47,190.

This item is required to cover the cost of Government contribution to retirement fund required by Public Law 854, 84th Congress.

The additional cost results from increase in basic pay rates. Purchase of electrical energy-increased from $1,355,000 to $1,400,000_

No increase has been provided under this allotment for the past 3 years. The present allotment was fixed in 1965 prior to completion of construction work and improvements then underway. The cost of purchase of electrical energy for the fiscal year 1967 amounted to $1,331,475, a saving of $23,525. The present rate of expenditure indicates that there will be no savings in the fiscal year 1968; in fact, the expenditures are expected to exceed the allotment by a moderate amount.

Expenditures under this allotment have been increasing this year and will further increase in the fiscal year 1969. This increase is due, mainly, to completion and placing in service, this year, of the final phase of air conditioning the main Library of Congress Building, the House Underground Garages in squares 637 and 691, and the first phase of remodeling of the Cannon Building which, with improved lighting, heating, and air conditioning, has added to the electrical load. In addition, the remainder of the Cannon Building, under the second phase of the remodeling program, will be completed by the end of this fiscal year and will further increase the electrical load in the fiscal year 1969. The electrical load is also gradually increasing in the various office buildings, from year to year, due to the use of additional business machines and other mechanical equipment.

The 1968 estimate is based on the purchase of 112,917,000 kw.hrs. of electrical energy at an average cost of 1910 cents per kw.hrs. The 1969 estimate is based on the purchase of 116,667,000 kw.-hrs. of electrical energy at the same average cost of 1910 cents per kw.-hrs.-an increase of $45,000.

2, 090

45, 000

All electrical energy required for the Capitol, Senate and House Office Buildings, U.S. Supreme Court Building, Library of Congress Buildings, Senate Garage, and Capitol Grounds street, park and floodlighting systems has been purchased under the Capitol Power Plant appropriation from the local public utility at rates negotiated by the General Services Administration for use throughout the Washington metropolitan area by Government agencies, generally, since 1951. This increase is urged in order to insure an adequate and uninterrupted supply of electrical energy for the Capitol and other buildings supplied with energy through this appropriation, in the fiscal year 1969. General annual repairs—increased from $85,000 to $100,000---------- 15,000 No increase has been provided under this allotment since 1966, when the present allotment of $85,000 was approved. This allotment has been inadequate to meet actual repair and maintenance costs during the past 3 years. In 1966, we had to expend $108,000 for general annual repairs; in 1967, $104,000; and in the fiscal year 1968, $60,000 to Jan. 31, 1968. There is no means by which this annual expenditure can be reduced if the plant is to be kept in dependable and uninterrupted service. During the fiscal years 1966 and 1967 we were able to meet the excess expenditure through savings in the allotment for purchase of electrical energy. Those savings materialized due to the fact that the electrical energy allotment was geared to construction program schedules under which delays were experienced. We can no longer count on savings from this source and must therefore request that the full amount of $100,000 now required, annually, for general annual repairs be provided under this allotment. We must maintain in good operating condition extensive steam generating equipment, consisting of such items as 7 large boilers, stokers, oil burners, fans, pumps, piping, dust collectors, ashhandling equipment; extensive refrigerating equipment, consisting of such items as 8 large compressors, 11 large pumps, 7 cooling towers, 7 fans; coal-handling equipment, consisting of such items as belt conveyors, car shakers, car thawers, 2 bulldozers, 2 trackmobile locomotives; auxiliary equipment, such as air compressors, ventilating fans; steam tunnels extending from the Capitol Power Plant to the Government Printing Office, with branch extensions to the various buildings served on Capitol Hill—these tunnels containing more than 3 miles of steam lines and extensive chilled water lines, large valves, traps, expansion joints, pressure reducing valves; oil-handling equipment, tanks, pumps; control equipment, such as meters, automatic controllers, control valves, actuators, gages, thermometers; electrical equipment, such as motors up to 2,500 horsepower, starters, circuit breakers, transformers, control wiring and equipment, lighting and power systems; service equipment, such as water and air lines, sump pumps, plumbing, and heating. The Capitol Power Plant, including its steam and refrigeration distribution systems, contains equipment having an estimated replacement value of over 12 million dollars. About two-thirds of this equipment is over 10 years old, resulting in the need for continually increasing maintenance and repair in order to insure uninterrupted service and decelerated depreciation, if the normal useful life of 30 years or more is to be realized for this substantial capital investment. Since 1965, under funds provided by Congress to meet expanded production requirements imposed upon the Capitol Power Plant due to an expanded building construction and improve"ment program on Capitol Hill, the refrigeration capacity of the plant has been increased by 75 percent and the steam generating capacity by 65 percent: fuel-handling and storage facilities have been installed for oil-fired boilers added at the plant; also, a 250,000-gallon oil storage tank, transfer pumps, oil heaters, piping systems, and auxiliary items, representing an investment of $450,000.

The cost of labor, materials, repair and replacement parts is constantly increasing and in view of the fact that the buildings occupied by the Congress and other components of the legislative branch are dependent upon the Capitol Power Plant for steam and chilled water supplies by the plant, it is urged that the general annual repairs allotment be increased by $15,000 for 1969 in order to insure adequate funds being available for maintenance and repair work necessary to keep the plant in dependable and

uninterrupted operation 365 days a year. Stoker rehabilitation.

10,000 In 1967, a program, estimated to cost $135,000, was commenced for replacement of the spreader stoker in each of the 3 steam generators at the Capítol Power Plant. Each of these steam generators has a steam-generating capacity of 110,000 pounds per hour, is coal-fired, and was placed in operation in August 1954. During the period, 1954 to 1967, when the stoker replacement program was commenced, each stoker had burned about 140,000 tons of coal during a period of 70,000 hours of operation. The average useful life of stoker grates varies from 10 to 15 years, depending upon the annual rate of combustion. Prolonged operation of aging grates invites danger of complete breakdown, results in lower operating efficiency, and creates tendency for air pollution.

For 1967, an allotment of $45,000 was provided for replacement of the stoker in one of the 3 steam generators. For 1968, an allotment of $50,000 was provided for replacement of the stoker in the second steam generator. These estimates were based on doing all the replacement work by contract. We have found it possible, howr ever, to purchase the stokers and install them by use of our regular Capitol Power Plant personnel acting under supervision of a qualified representative of the manufacturer of the stokers. Through this means, we have been able to effect sufficient savings in the replacement of the first two stokers to purchase the stoker equipment for the final or third steam generator with our existing funds and to complete the installation of the third stoker through an additional appropriation of $10,000 for 1969, instead of an appropriation of $45,000 originally contemplated when the program was presented to the Appropriations Committee in 1967.

The $10,000 requested for 1969 will complete the stoker replace

ment program. Fuel-increased from $466,000 to $488,000_--

22, 000 The 1968 appropriation for fuel is based on 33,000 tons of coal @ $9.40 per ton and 2,600,000 gallons of fuel oil @ 6 cents per gallon.

The estimate for fuel for 1969 is based on 33,000 tons of coal @ $10.07 per ton and 2.600,000 gallons of fuel oil @ 6 cents per gallon.

The increase of $22,000 requested for 1969 is to meet the increased cost of coal per ton required for next year. The contract, now in effect, provides for a cost of $10.22 per ton.

Coal for the Capitol powerplant is purchased through the Federal Bureau of Supply, General Services Administration, under authority of Public Law 152, 81st Congress, as amended. Bids for fuel are received in April or May each year by that Bureau and the fuel is contracted for with a provision in the contract allowing for changes in wage and freight rates. The coal now being used at the plant comes from the Guyan Eagle Mine No. 5 and Coal Mountain No. 12, both of the Island Creek Coal Sales Company, shipped from Coal Mountain and Kelly, W. Va. It is a nut and slack coal.

The fuel oil required for the plant is also purchased through
supply schedules of the Fuel Branch, General Services Adminis-
tration.

At present, 70 percent of the total steam output is produced by
coal-fired equipment and 30 percent by oil-burning steam gen-
erators.
Total

(+)115, 400 Total estimate for 1969.

2, 927,000

BOTANIC GARDEN, SALARIES AND EXPENSES Senator PROXMIRE. For the Botanic Garden, salaries and expenses you are requesting $568,000, a net decrease of $29,500.

Pages 205 to 208 will be placed in the record.

(The justification follows :) 1968 appropriation in annual act--Wage-Board Pay Supplemental--

13.

Total appropriations, 1968_-

DEDUCTIONS

Installation of greenhouse evaporative cooling system in four green

houses at Poplar Point Nursery: Nonrecurring item allowed for

1968, not required for 1969.. Repairs, replacements, and improvements to electrical systems, Main

Conservatory, office building, and Bartholdi Display Fountain : Nonrecurring item allowed for 1968, not required for 1969..

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Wage-Board Increases authorized by Public Law 763, 83d Congress

Under the provisions of Public Law 763, 83d Congress, J1 laborers, gardeners and mechanics on the Botanic Garden Roll are compensated on a wage-board, prevailing-rate basis. Public Law 763 provides that the compensation of such employees shall be fixed and adjusted from time to time as nearly as is consistent with the public interest in accordance with prevailing rates.

An increase of $6,200 is requested for 1969 to meet on a fullyear basis the cost of increased wage rates established for these wage-board positions as a result of a general survey of goverument and industrial employees' wages in the WashingtonMetropolitan area, conducted during the past year.

The new rates went into effect October 22, 1967, in accordance with the provisions of Public Law 85–872, 85th Cong. This increase is necessary in order that the Botanic Garden wage-board employees may be compensated on a full-year basis in the fiscal year 1969 in accordance with prevailing rates.

An increase of $1,960 is requested for 1969 to meet the cost of within-grade promotions and other changes falling due in that year, authorized by Public Law 763 under the wage-board system,

for employees compensated under that act. Within-grade promotions authorized by the Classification Act of 1949,

as amended, for employees compensated under that act... Nightwork and Sunday differential pay increased from $7.7110) to $10,900 --

This increase is necessary to meet the cost on a current expenditure basis of work performed under this allotment. ('osts under this allotment have been gradually increasing over the past several years, due to annual wage-rate increases provided by law. and the point has now been reached where a realistic adjustment

under this allotment is necessary. Pay above the stated annual rate allotment, increase..

Normally, it is necessary to provide, annually. for one addi. tional day's pay above the regular 260 basic workdays per year. since usually the extra day falls on a basic workday (Mondas to Friday). This allotment is determined by dedueting 7.2 Saturdays and 52 Sundays from the total of 36.5 calendar days in a normal year. Last year (leap year), one additional day fell on a

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Saturday and the other on a Sunday, resulting in the elimination
of the need for this allotment for 1968. For 1969, the additional
day falls on a basic workday, necessitating the need for restora-

tion of this allotment for 1969.
Increased pay costs due to Public Law 90–206 Federal Salary Act of
1967, approved Dec. 16, 1967---

$1, 940 Increases authorized by this act went into effect, Oct. 8, 1967. The cost for the fiscal 1968 amounts to $1, 410. Due to delay in filling 1 new job allowed for 1968, it is possible to absorb this cost for 1968. However, since such saving will not recur in 1969, it is necessary to request for 1969 the full annual cost of $1,940 for

next year. ('tility Services, increased from $3,300 to $4,100_

800 This allotment was fixed at $3,300 in 1966, after the 8 new additional greenhouses were placed in service at Poplar Point Nursey. The allotment provides for electric current for lighting the greenhouses and grounds and power for the pumps at the nursery which circulate water in the heating system serving the 16 greenhouses at the nursery; also, electric current for compressors, refrigeration, fans, boiler motors, and electric soil sterilizer.

The increase of $800 for 1969 is requested in order to adjust this allotment to a current expenditure basis. Last year, the actual cost amounted to $3,948. The increase results from an increase in the cost of propane gas for the boilers, from the use of additional pumps to maintain proper control over rise of water in the old greenhouses, from the installation of an electric soil sterilizer,

and from additional lighting installed in the greenhouses. Supplies and materials, increased from $12,000 to $13,000--

1,000 No increase has been provided under this allotment since 1963 and the point has now been reached where an upward adjustment of $1,000 is required in order to meet the minimum needs of the gardens, based on the present cost of supplies and materials.

This allotment provides all misellaneous materials and supplies for the garden and the nursery, including fuel, electric supplies, flower pots and tubs, gas and oil for motor vehicles and tractors, hardware and tools, labels and boxes, manure and fertilizers, insecticides, fungicides and scalecides, medical and office supplies,

paint, brushes, periodicals and books, and towels. Botanic Garden stock, increased from $20,300 to $22,300.

2, 000
No increase has been provided under this allotment since 1963
and, with continually rising costs, the point has now been reached
where an upward adjustment of $2,000 is required in order to meet
minimum needs under this allotment, based on present cost of
plant material and other items purchased unde this allotment.

The allotment for 1969 is based on $9,000 for plants and bulbs
for seasonal exhibitions at the conservatory, such as chrysan-
themums, carnations, palms, cacti, ferns, bulbs, pansies, primula,
cyclamen, azaleas, pandanus, sanseveria, begonias, bromelias,
gardenias, and lantanas; $500 for herbaceous perennials and other
hardy plants for the outdoor garden site; $4,500 for miscellaneous
stock; $500 for seeds ; $4,300 for moss and soil; and $3,500 for mis-
cellaneous equipment, such as garden tools, hose, hand mowers,
and office equipment.
Total

(+) 19,500

Total estimate for 1969.

568, 000

MAIN CONSERVATORY VISITORS FROM 1939 TO 1968

Senator PROXMIRE. I would also like to insert in the record the tables on page 217, which reflect the number of visitors in the main conservatory from 1939 to 1968.

I think this would be of interest. (The information follows:)

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