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a total cut of $15,000. The House committee, however, restored this amount to the budget request to provide for an unbudgeted item for additional costs necessary on the part of the Architect of the Capitol to keep the Capitol Building open from 4:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., daily, from Easter through Labor Day. This action of the House is not appealed.

ACCESS TO CAPITOL BUILDING

Senator MONRONEY. Don't you think that is a pretty good idea for all the students and people coming through here seeing the Capitol ? It closes now at 4:30, does it not?

Mr. STEWART. Yes, sir.

Senator MONRONEY. And the people, when they put signs outside and people think that is as long as Congress works, and they think they cannot get in, and they cannot cross over and see the House in operation if the Senate is busy, and the signs are up, and this is part of-in other words, they cut some of these other funds out for the operation of the Capitol to make it possible for keeping the Capitol open between Easter and Labor Day. Mr. STEWART. Yes, sir. Mr. HENLOCK. $15,000.

Senator MONRONEY. I wonder if 10 o'clock, though, is not too late for visitors.

Mr. HENLOCK. Congressman Kirwan made the recommendation, Senator, on the basis of the evening hours the Smithsonian and one of the other public buildings are kept open.

Senator YARBOROUGH. Archives.

Senator MONRONEY. Keep all three of them open so that they can get to see Washington and have something to do in the evenings.

Senator YARBOROUGHI. Mr. Chairman, I want to commend the Architect, or whoever is responsible for opening the building up, because we have that complaint from people bringing these high school groups in. If they have these places to go, students want to see them, and if they have no place to go, they go out on the town and some of them get mugged on the sidewalks if they are not in gangs, and I have complaints from people who come here and say, “Well, I can get into my courthouse at home and get in the city hall at night, but you come up here and everything is locked up, and what do you do? Don't you ever work up here?”. It is the Capitol of the Nation, and some people come by late in the day with automobiles on a trip, it is a one-time, one-night, maybe, and they do not have a whole day in their lives, in their lifetime, to ever get to see the Capitol, and they drive around and see the exterior of the Capitol. That is a good expenditure of money.

Senator MONRONEY. I think so, too. This was not to include the Senate and House Office Buildings, only the Capitol. It would not include the subway trains?

VANDALISM IN CAPITOL BUILDING

Mr. STEWART. It would not include the subway trains. In the discussion at the House hearings, it was only the Capitol Building itself that was proposed to be kept open-specifically, the first floor and the second floor, and admission to the Senate and House galleries.

But I would like to say for the record that one thing that disturbs me about night openings and has disturbed me for a good many years is that there be provided adequate protection against the vandalism that takes place in the Capitol building, whether it is by the visitors or anyone else. Recently, on the Senate side, someone tried to pry off the two small bronze flags from the Hanson statue. We have recently had to renew the sword on the Sam Houston statue in Statuary Hall. We have had other acts of vandalism; in fact, for awhile we had an epidemic of souvenir hunters. We had difficulty in keeping the tiebacks on the draperies in the East Front, which were removed and taken away by someone. We have had some evidently acrobatically inclined individuals who wanted to hang onto some of the arms of the ornamental lights, the urns we had on the Senate steps, and we found a few years ago that some of the bronze on the bronze doors of both the Senate and House side had been defaced. Senator YARBOROUGH. They even broke the marble trigger guard that Stephen Austin, father of Texas, had. Somebody strong must have tried to break that marble off. Mr. STEwART. That is right. I hope that sometime in the near future some committee or committees of the Congress may see fit to h: organize the conduct of people in an orderly way in the Capitol. Senator MoNRONEY. You mean the employees of the Capitol? Mr. STEwART. No; I hope the general public will acquire a little bit more respect. We have had occasions where they have run rampant in the halls. Senator MoRRONEY. You think these are employees who do this? Mr. STEwART. No: it is outsiders, who come in off the street. The doors are wide open. Senator MoNRoNEY. The doors are closed at 4:30. Mr. STEwART. That is true, but much of the vandalism takes place during the hours that the building is open to the public. £ator YARBOROUGH. Do not we need more guards and more policeInnen a Senator MonRoNEY. Maybe not any more guards, but better guards. I think you have so many now they are running out of your ears, but I do not think they are trained in police work. I think all policemen we use should be given a course of training by the FBI or something to be at least as effective as police officers. If they cannot qualify for that, why find them jobs on the elevators or something of that kind?

VISITOR Volu ME

Senator YoUNG. Mr. Chairman. how do the number of the visitors now compare with past years? It seems to me right now it is at an alltime high.

Mr. STEwART. We have had by an estimated count as many as 53,000 persons in 1 day, visiting the Capitol. That would include you and me and all the tourists and others coming into the Capitol. We have not tried to segregate them. I would say on an average we are running somewhere between 35,000 and 38,000 people using the U.S. Capitol 7 days a week for every day of the year, except 3 days when the building is closed.

I

apairs to sidewalks, roads and parking lots
Varch 23-28, 1964.—Poured and finished exposed pea gravel aggregate concrete
und west front fountain. Patched concrete in fountain on top of Legislative
age.
pril 13, 1964.–Patched holes in roads.
pril 14–27, 1964.–Applied asphalt over sidewalks on both sides of Carroll St.,
heast.
ze 23, 1964.- Repaired exposed aggregate sidewalks on north side of Consti-
1 Avenue, from Delaware Avenue to New Jersey Avenue.
420-22, 1964.-Repaired exposed aggregate sidewalks on New Jersey Ave.
etween Constitution Avenue, C Street, and Louisiana Avenue.
27-30, 1964.-Repaired cracks and broken areas in sidewalks along both
f East Capitol Street, from First Street to the Plaza.
48t 3–5, 1964.-—-Repaired holes in parking lot behind House Office Building.
mber 28, 1964.-Erected concrete block partition walls in Legislative
tunnel for storage areas for Senate vehicle supplies.
er 12, 1964.Placed asphalt over parking lot in rear of Rayburn House
uilding parking lot.
r 19, 1964.Patched holes in parking lot in rear of House Office Building.
is period, 62.5 tons of asphalt, bituminous plant mix was used.
naintenance and miscellaneous
ly routine maintenance on the Grounds included daily sweeping of the
eps and walks ; removal of trash and debris from the Grounds; pick
ind general hauling for the buildings in the legislative group; sweep-
and drives twice a week with the mechanical sweeper; mowing lawns
- part of April through September; washing down Capitol steps twice
atering lawns at night, 6 nights a week, during the summer.
crop of leaves was raked from October through December, 1964.
d ice were removed from walks, steps, and roads on the following

iry 10–13, 1965. iry 16-18, 1965. ry 31, 1965. ary 15, 1965. ded spreading sand and ice removing pellets on these areas. ds forces were responsible for putting up the cables for the Inaugunerals during this period. rision ing work was accomplished by this division on the underground tems and sewers for the period March 1, 1964, through February

64-March 7, 1964.-General maintenance on the sprinkler systems Is. 64-March 17, 1964.-Installed drain lines at Poplar Point Nursery. 96 4-March 31, 1964.-General maintenance, placed topsoil around d sprinkler heads. 4-April 24, 1964.–General maintenance on sprinkler system on Capitol ; dewinterizing system, checking spray heads and valves. 64-May 14, 1961.-General maintenance on sprinkler system on Capitol ; dewinterizing system, checking heads and valves. -May 19, 1964.-General maintenance on sprinkler system in west cking heads and valves. May 21, 1964.-General maintenance on sprinkler system in Old uilding courtyard. June 2, 1964.-Installed waterlines in the fields at Poplar Point -Night watering of lawns started. June 13, 1964. lacement of sprinkler heads, Senate side of ded around ! July 22, 1

ystem on new Grounds, area istitution

**e, Delaware Avenue, and

re.

14.-Rep!
wst 26, 194

so Building, Northwest.

-inch valve, general

But I would like to say for the record that one thing that disturbs me about night openings and has disturbed me for a good many years is that there be provided adequate protection against the vandalism that takes place in the Capitol building, whether it is by the visitors or anyone else.

Recently, on the Senate side, someone tried to pry off the two small bronze flags from the Hanson statue. We have recently had to renew the sword on the Sam Houston statue in Statuary Hall.

We have had other acts of vandalism; in fact, for awhile we had an epidemic of souvenir hunters. We had difficulty in keeping the tiebacks on the draperies in the East Front, which were removed and taken away by someone.

We have had some evidently acrobatically inclined individuals who wanted to hang onto some of the arms of the ornamental lights, the urns we had on the Senate steps, and we found a few years ago that some of the bronze on the bronze doors of both the Senate and House side had been defaced.

Senator YARBOROUGH. They even broke the marble trigger guard that Stephen Austin, father of Texas, had. Somebody strong must have tried to break that marble off.

Mr. STEWART. That is right. I hope that sometime in the near future some committee or committees of the Congress may see fit to help organize the conduct of people in an orderly way in the Capitol.

Senator MONRONEY. You mean the employees of the Capitol?

Mr. STEWART. No: I hope the general public will acquire a little bit more respect. We have had occasions where they have run rampant in the halls.

Senator MONRONEY. You think these are employees who do this?

Mr. STEWART. Yo; it is outsiders, who come in off the street. The doors are wide open.

Senator MONROEY. The doors are closed at 4:30.

Mr. STEWART. That is true, but much of the vandalism takes place during the hours that the building is open to the public.

Senator YARBOROUGH. Do not we need more guards and more police. men ?

Senator MONRONEY. Maybe not any more guards, but better guards. I think you have so many now they are running out of your ears, but I do not think they are trained in police work. I think all policemen we use should be given a course of training by the FBI or something to be at least as effective as police officers. If they cannot qualify for that, why find them jobs on the elevators or something of that kind?

VISITOR VOLUME

Senator YOUNG. Mr. Chairman, how do the number of the visitors now compare with past years? It seems to me right now it in at an alltime high.

Mr. STEWART. We have had by an estimated count as many as 53,000 persons in 1 day, visiting the capitol. That would include you and me and all the tourists and others coming into the Capitol. We have not tried to segregate them. I would sav on an average we are running somewhere between 35,000 and 35.000 people using the U.S. Capitol 7 days a week for every day of the year, except 3 days when the building is closed.

Senator Young. Is part of that due to the World's Fair? As far as my constitutents are concerned, a great many of them go to the World's Fair and then come down to the Capitol.

Mr. STEWART. It could be. But we have some attractions here, too. The ride on the subway is one of them. The exhibit of statues throughout he Capitol and other historic items attract the people who come here.

It is hard to determine exactly what is the magnet that draws the most of the people here. I would say that it is more that they want to visit the Capitol itself, and since the publication of the book “We, the People” by the Capital Historical Society, it seems the number of visitors have increased, and there has been an increase in the interest on the part of visitors to see the statues, portraits, and other items of interest they have read about in the book. It has created additional interest.

Senator YARBOROUGH. Mr. Stewart, if we average 30,000 people a day, that would be in the course of the year, 365 days, about 10,950,000 people. I have that in a rough calculation, it might be erroneous. Do you think that that many people are visiting the Capitol a year now?

Mr. STEWART. The last estimate we made was 7 million, but it has increased this year.

Senator YARBOROUGH. If you took the peak season it would average out 10 million or 11 million?

Mr. STEWART. That is right.

Senator Young. How many more could you handle at this time of vear? It seems to me there is a limited number that can be handled through here?

Senator MONRONEY. If you make the time from 4:30 to 10 you can double the time that they can visit here, fewer at a time.

Mr. STEWART. That is true. You may get a different class of visitors after 4:30. Perhaps there would not be quite as many children, but it is problematical until it is tried. No one can definitely say what it would be or what effect the night opening would have on the number of visitors at this time.

Senator MONRONEY. The Capitol is kept open on Sundays now, is it not?

Mr. STEWART. Yes, sir, the same hours as on week days.
Senator MONRONEY. I see. You may continue.

L'AINTING

Mr. STEWART. An increase of $23,000 is requested on page 25 of the justification, and was approved by the House, to provide funds to paint, with two coats, the ornamental ceiling, window frames, window linings, doors, jambs, trim and painted surfaces of the gallery walls in Statuary Hall, last painted in 1959. This work should be done for purposes of preservation and appearance. The cost of scaffolding for this work is estimated at $3,000; of labor for painting, $16,000; of paint materials, $1,000.

On page 26 of the justification $75,000 is requested to paint the exterior of the cast iron dome of the Capitol, the exterior sandstone of the west-central section of the Capitol, and the exterior doors, windows and frames, and exterior duct work on the roof, ladders, and runways.

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