Lectures on the Relation Between Law & Public Opinion in England: During the Nineteenth Century

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Transaction Publishers, 1924 - Great Britain - 506 pages

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Contents

Introduction to Second Edition
xxiii
Law not always the result of public opinion
1
Law in modern England the result of public opinion 910
9
Precise scope of lectures 1718
17
Does not advance of democracy explain development
48
Three main currents of legislative opinion corresponding
62
LECTURE V
70
B Absence of changes in law 8494
84
LECTURE VII
211
Explanation of change to be found not in advance
217
Pebiod of Collectivism
249
1 Principles of Collectivism 259288
259
B Trend of collectivist legislation 288302
288
The Debt of Collectivism to Benthamism
303
LECTURE X
311
B Actual course of ecclesiastical legislation 335358
335

0 Why considerable changes took place during period
95
D Close of period of quiescence 110125
110
LECTUEE VI
126
A Benthamite ideas as to the reform of the law 134168
134
B The acceptance of Benthamism 168184
168
G Trend and tendency of Benthamite legislation 184210
184
LECTUEE XI
361
legislation 395398
395
APPENDIX
467
INDEX
495
Copyright

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Page xxx - These are good reasons for remonstrating with him, or reasoning with him, or persuading him, or entreating him, but not for compelling him, or visiting him with any evil in case he do otherwise.
Page xxix - ... the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community against his will is to prevent harm to others. His own good, either physical or moral, is not a sufficient warrant. He cannot rightfully be compelled to do or forbear because it will be better for him to do so, because it will make him happier, because in the opinions of others to do so would be wise or even right.
Page 145 - the doing good to mankind, in obedience to the will of God, and for the sake of everlasting happiness.
Page 430 - Whatever power such a being may have over me, there is one thing which he shall not do : he shall not compel me to worship him. I will call no being good, who is not what I mean when I apply that epithet to my fellowcreatures ; and if such a being can sentence me to hell for not so calling him, to hell I will go.
Page 422 - Now, what I want is, Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out everything else. You can only form the minds of reasoning animals upon Facts : nothing else will ever be of any service to them. This is the principle on which I bring up my own children, and this is the principle on which I bring up these children. Stick to Facts, sir...
Page 147 - ... all men are created equal; and are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; and that among these are, life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness...
Page xxix - That principle is that the sole end for which mankind are warranted individually or collectively in interfering with the liberty of action of any of their number is self-protection ; that the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community against his will is to prevent harm to others.
Page 4 - When we inquire by what means this wonder is effected, we shall find, that, as Force is always on the side of the governed, the governors have nothing to support them but opinion. It is, therefore, on opinion only that government is founded; and this maxim extends to the most despotic and most military governments, as well as to the most free and most popular.
Page 160 - Thirdly, from this liberty of each individual follows the liberty, within the same limits, of combination among individuals; freedom to unite, for any purpose not involving harm to others: the persons combining being supposed to be of full age, and not forced or deceived.
Page 188 - ... by the people, I repeat, I mean the middle classes, the wealth and intelligence of the country, the glory of the British name...

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