Locating Consciousness

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John Benjamins Publishing, Nov 8, 1995 - Psychology - 266 pages
Locating Consciousness argues that our qualitative experiences should be aligned with the activity of a single and distinct memory system in our mind/brain. Spelling out in detail what we do and do not know about phenomenological experience, this book denies the common view of consciousness as a central decision-making system. Instead, consciousness is viewed as a lower level dynamical structure underpinning our information processing. This new perspective affords novel solutions to a wide range of problems: the absent qualia, the binding problem, the inverted spectra, the specter of epiphenomenalism, the explanatory gap, the distinction between objective and subjective, and the general skeptical doubts about the viability of the naturalist project itself. Drawing on recent data in psychology and neuroscience, Locating Consciousness also discusses when we become conscious and when we should think other animals are conscious. (Series A)
 

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Contents

Naturalism about Subjective Experience Chapter One
1
The Limits of Theory Chapter Two
21
Consciousness as a Natural Kind Chapter Three
43
A Multiple Memory System Framework Chapter Four
59
Conscious Perception and Semantic Memory Chapter Five
85
How Do We Get There From Here?Chapter Six
103
Martian Pain and the Problem of Absent Qualia Chapter Seven
135
Executive Processing and Consciousness as Structure Chapter Eight
151
The Moment of Consciousness Chapter Nine
173
NOTES
195
References
219
Index
257
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