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EVALUATION OF
LEGISLATIVE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1946

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1948

UNITED STATES SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON EXPENDITURES
IN THE EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS,

Washington, D. C. The committee met, pursuant to call, at 10:15 a. m. in the committee room, Senate Office Building, Senator George D. Aiken (chairman of the committee) presiding.

Present: Senators Aiken, Thye, McClellan, and Hoey.
Also present: E. B. Van Horn, committee staff director.
The CHAIRMAN. The committee will come to order.

This is a hearing of the full Committee on Expenditures in the Executive Departments on the subject of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946. The act, Public Law 601 of the Seventy-ninth Congress, provides in section 102 (1) g (2) (C)such committee shall have the duty of * * * evaluating the effects of laws enacted to reorganize the legislative and executive branches of the Government. The act is, of course, the reorganization of the legislative branch. A copy will be included in the record of the hearing at the conclusion of my statement.

The act went into effect on the first day of the first session of the Eightieth Congress and many people consider it to be the most thoroughgoing reorganization which Congress has ever attempted. We have now had one full year of operation under the act and it is desirable that we take stock of our position; that we determine wherein the act has been effective; and that we attempt to strengthen it in the places where it may be weak. That is the purpose of these hearings.

We wish to develop every side of the questions which will be raised and we shall have testimony from both major political parties, from congressional leaders, from committee chairmen, and from outside experts who have studied the effectiveness of the act without becoming enmeshed in its day-to-day operations. It is anticipated that hearings will be held today, tomorrow, and Wednesday, and that they will then be adjourned to February 17, at which time we hope to hear from Senator La Follette, who was one of the two authors of the act, the President pro tempore of the Senate, and others who cannot appear this week. At the conclusion of the hearings, the committee will consider the recommendations which it will wish to make to the Senate.

This morning we are concerned with the broad aspects of the Legislative Reorganization Act and have invited the leaders of the Senate majority and minority parties to testify, along with Mr.

Robert Heller of Cleveland, Ohio. Senator Barkley is unable to be
here this morning. I understand he has an appointment with the
Foreign Relations Committee. The first witness this morning is
Senator Taft.

We are glad to have you with us, Senator. We would like to have
your ideas as to where the Reorganization Act may be weak and how
it can be strengthened so as to permit a better functioning of the
legislative processes.

(The Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946, Public Law 601,
79th Cong., is as follows:)

[Public Law 601—79TH CONGRESS)
(CHAPTER 753—2D Session)

(S. 2177]
AN ACT To provide for increased efficiency in the legislative branch of the Gyvernment
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of
America in Congress assembled,

SHORT TITLE
That (a) this Act, divided into titles and sections according to the following
table of contents, may be cited as the “Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946":

TABLE OF CONTENTS

TITLE I-CHANGES IN Rules or SENATE AND HOUSE
Sec. 101. Rule-making power of the Senate and House.

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PART 1-STANDING RULES OF THE SENATE

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PART 1-STANDING RULES OF THE SENATE

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE SENATE

SEC. 102. Rule XXV of the Standing Rules of the Senate is amended to read

as follows:

"Rule XXV

“STANDING COMMITTEES

(1) The following standing committees shall be appointed at the commence-
ment of each Congress, with leave to report by bill or otherwise:

(a) Committee on Agriculture and Forestry, to consist of thirteen Senators,
to which committee shall be referred all proposed legislation, messages, petitions,
memorials, and other matters relating to the following subjects:

1. Agriculture generally.
“2. Inspection of livestock and meat products.
3. Animal industry and diseases of animals.

“4. Adulteration of seeds, insect pests, and protection of birds and animals in
forest reserves.

5. Agricultural colleges and experiment stations.

“6. Forestry in general, and forest reserves other than those created from the

public domain.

7. Agricultural economics and research.

“8. Agricultural and industrial chemistry.

“9. Dairy industry.

"10. Entomology and plant quarantine.

“11. Human nutrition and home economics.

"12. Plant industry, soils, and agricultural engineering.

“13. Agricultural educational extension services.

“14. Extension of farm credit and farm security.

15. Rural electrification.

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