Chambers's Encyclopædia: A Dictionary of Universal Knowledge for the People, Volume 5

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W. and R. Chambers, 1876 - Encyclopedias and dictionaries

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Page 59 - that every particle of matter in the universe attracts every other particle, with a force whose direction is that of the line joining the two, and whose magnitude is directly as the product of their masses, and inversely as the square of their distances from each other.
Page 39 - And if by grace, then is it no more of works: otherwise grace is no more grace. But if it be of works, then is it no more grace: otherwise work is no more work.
Page 84 - Florence), and a protracted discussion took place, the chief points of which were the procession of the Holy Ghost from the Father and the Son...
Page 174 - ... confinement of the person by secretly hurrying him to jail, where his sufferings are unknown or forgotten, is a less public, a less striking, and therefore a more dangerous engine of arbitrary government; and yet sometimes when the State is in real danger, even this may be a necessary measure.
Page 104 - December one thousand eight hundred and fifty-six, no irregular marriage contracted in Scotland by declaration, acknowledgment, or ceremony shall be valid, unless one of the parties had at the date thereof his or her usual place of residence there, or had lived in Scotland for twenty-one days next preceding such marriage ; any law, custom, or usage to the contrary notwithstanding.
Page 265 - I have so ruled my life, that when death came, I might face it without fear.
Page 117 - And Abraham planted a grove in Beer-sheba, and called there on the name of the LORD, the everlasting God.
Page 17 - We have not received," saith Irenaeus, " the knowledge of the way of our salvation by any others than those by whom the gospel has been brought to us. Which gospel they first preached, and afterwards, by the will of God, committed to writing, that it might be for time to come the foundation and pillar of our faith.
Page 35 - The people for whom the form of government is intended must be willing to accept it; or at least not so unwilling as to oppose an insurmountable obstacle to its establishment. They must be willing and able to do what is necessary to keep it standing. And they must be willing and able to do what it requires of them to enable it to fulfil its purposes. The word " do " is to be understood as including forbearances as well as acts.
Page 73 - Ireland; and that the royal style and titles appertaining to the imperial crown of the said united kingdom and its dependencies ; and also the ensigns, armorial flags, and banners thereof, shall be such as his Majesty, by his royal proclamation under the great seal of the united kingdom, shall be pleased to appoint.

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