Theories of Cognition in the Later Middle Ages

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Cambridge University Press, May 28, 1997 - Philosophy - 330 pages
This book is a major contribution to the history of philosophy in the later medieval period (1250-1350). It focuses on cognitive theory, a subject of intense investigation during these years. In fact many of the issues that dominate philosophy of mind and epistemology today--intentionality, mental representation, skepticism, realism--were hotly debated in the later medieval period. The book offers a careful analysis of these debates, primarily through the work of Thomas Aquinas, Peter John Olivi, and William Ockham.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Thomas Aquinas and the theory of species
11
Challenges to the theory
18
Immateriality and intentionality
31
Intentionality made mysterious
63
Form and representation
86
Passivity and attention
125
Are species superfluous?
161
Aquinas and direct realism
195
The veil of species
220
Word and concept
254
A new form of knowing
290
Henry of Ghent and intelligible species
306
Index
321
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