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PS AL-M LXXXIX.

This psalm is the fum and substance of the bible. It

contains a lively description of the covenant of the Father and of the Son. The holy Ghost by the mouth of David proposes the subject in the two first verses. The Father speaks to the Son 3d and 4th verses : Then the prophet to the 19th. The Father to the Son from the 19th to the 38th, and then the prophet to the end. These are the sure mercies of David, to which the apostle refers, Acts xiii. and these are the burden of all our fongs of praise-the Father's covenant engagement with his Son, and ratified with his oath, as ver. 3. and his unchange. able purposes concerning Christ, and all his : For when these mercies are applied by the holy Spirit and made ours by believing, then we have the new song put into our hearts, and mouths, which the church militant and triumphant is using. May the holy Spirit explain this pfalm to day, and for the confirmation of our faith teach us what is here said of the power and faithfulness of God to fulfill his promises, even when outward providences would lead one to doubt, whether bis covenant was ordered in all things and sure. The words require much faith and gratitude. To be sung aright the heart thould be duly affected with a fense of God's mercy and truth. May we sing with David's spirit, ascribing all the glory of covenant blessings to free grace and fovereign love.

1.
O sing the mercies of the Lord

my tongue shall never spare, My mouth from age to age accords thy truth for to declare.

N4

II. For

11.

For mercy Mall be built, said I,

for ever to endure,
Thy faithfulness ev’n in the heav'ns
thou wilt establish sure.

III.
With mine elect, faith God, have I

a faithful cov'nant made, And sworn to my beloved Son having to him thus faid,

IV.
I will thy feed establish sure
· for ever to remain,
And will to generations all

thy throne build and maintaili,

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THE heav'ns do shew with joy and mirth 1 thy wond'rous works, O Lord, Thy saints within thy church on earth thy faithfulness record.

11. For who in heav'n may with the Lord

at all himself compare, Who is like God aniong the fons of those that mighty are ?

III. Great

III.

Great fear in meeting of the saints

is due unto the Lord : And he of all about him should

with rev'rence be ador'd.

IV.

Lord God of hosts in all the world

what one is like to thee? On ev'ry side, most mighty Lord

thy truth is seen to be.

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The second Sunday after Trinity.

PSALM LXXXIX.

LM

TF that his fons forfake my law

and do begin to swerve,
And of my judgments have no awe,,
and will them not obserye ;

H.
Then with the rod will I begin

their doings to amend;
And so will fcourge them from their sin:
whenever they offend.

III.
But yet my mercy and goodness.

I will not take away
From him, nor let my faithfulness
in any wise decay.

IV.
But sure my cov'nant I will hold

with all that I have spoke,
No word the which my lips have told:
shall alter'd be or broke.

V.
For this all praise be unto thee,

O God, the Lord most high,
From this time forth for evermore,
Amen, Amen say I.

PSALM

PSALM XC.

This is a psalm of Moses the man of God, in whofe

days singing was in use in the church, and has been ever since. He describes the shortness of life and prays for wisdom from above to teach him how to redeem the time, because the days were short and evil. This should be our daily prayer. The Lord give us grace so to use those flying moments, that we may be prepared to die. This is our one great: leffon. We have lived to no purpose, till we have learnt it. If we have not yet begun, may the Lord: now fet us about it in earnest. And if he has made us wise unto salvation, then we shall ascribe all the praise to our divine teacher, who will be our guide in life and death, and our God for ever..

I.
LORD, a thousand years appear

no more before thy sight Than yesterday, when it is paft,

or than a watch by night.

For in thine anger all our days

do pass unto an end,
And as a tale that hath been told,
so we our years do spend.

II.
Threescore and ten years do sum up

our days and years, we fee, Or if by reason of more strength in. some fourscore they be,

11. Yet

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