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property, shall deliver or cause to be delivered to any person having authority to receive the same any amount of such money or other property less than that for which he received a certificate or took a receipt; or whoever, being authorized to make or deliver any certifi. cate, voucher, receipt, or other paper certifying the receipt of arms, ammunition, provisions, clothing, or other property so used or to be used, shall make or deliver the same to any other person without a full knowledge of the truth of the facts stated therein and with intent to defraud the United States, or any department thereof, or any corporation in which the United States of America is a stockholder, shall be fined not more than $10,000 or imprisoned not more than ten years,

Penalties. (C) And whoever shall take and carry away or take for his use, or for the use of another, with intent to steal or purloin, or shall willfully injure or commit any depredation against, any property of the United States, or any branch or department thereof, or any corporation in which the United States of America is a stockholder, or any property which has been or is being made, manufactured, or constructed under contract for the War or Navy Departments of the United States, shall be punished as follows: If the value of such property exceeds the sum of $50, by a fine of not more than $10,000 or imprisonment for not more than ten years, or both; if the value of such property does not exceed the sum of $50, by a fine of not more than $1,000 or by imprisonment in a jail for not more than one year, or both. Value, as used in this section, shall mean market value or cost price, either wholesale or retail, whichever shall be the greater. (May 30, 1908, 35 Stat. 555; Mar. 4, 1909, sec. 35, 35 Stat. 1095; Oct. 23, 1918, 40 Stat. 1015; June 18, 1934, 48 Stat. 996; Apr. 4, 1938, 52 Stat. 197; 18 U. S. C., secs. 80 note, 82 and 83 to 86 notes.)

1254. Hunting or taking eggs on bird breeding grounds.—[Functions of Secretary of Agriculture relating to conservation of wildlife, game, and migratory birds were transferred to Secretary of Interior by Reorganization Plan No. II, sec. 4 (f) effective July 1, 1939, set out in paragraph 115–31 of this volume.] (June 28, 1906, 34 Stat. 537; Mar. 4, 1909, sec. 84, 35 Stat. 1104; Apr. 15, 1924, 43 Stat. 98; 18 U. S. C., sec. 145 note.)

1260–1. Falsely pretending to be member or agent of 4-H clubs; fraudulent use of insignia or emblems.—That it shall be unlawful for any person falsely and with intent to defraud to hold himself out as or represent or pretend himself to be a member of, associated with, or an agent or representative for the 4H clubs, an organization established by the Extension Service of the United States Department of Agriculture and the land grant colleges, for any purpose whatsoever; or for any person with intent to defraud to wear or display the sign or emblem of said 4H clubs or any insignia in colorable imitation thereof for the purpose of inducing the belief that he is a member of, associated with, or an agent or representative for said 4H clubs. It shall be unlawful for any person other than said 4-H clubs and those duly authorized by them, the representatives of the United States Department of Agriculture, the land grant colleges, and persons authorized by the Secretary of Agriculture, to use within the territory of the United States of America and its exterior possessions, for the purpose of trade or as an advertisement to induce the sale of any article whatsoever or for any business or charitable purpose, the recognized emblem of said 4H clubs, consisting of a green four-leaf clover with stem and the letter H in white or gold on each leaflet, or any sign, insignia, or symbol in colorable imitation thereof, or the words "4H Club” or 4-H Clubs” or any combination of these or other words or characters in colorable imitation thereof. If any person violates any provision of this Act, he shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction thereof, shall be fined not more than $300 or imprisoned not more than six months, or both, for each and every offense. (June 5, 1939, sec. 1, 53 Stat. 809; 18 U. S. C., sec. 76c.)

1260–2. Same; "person" defined.--The term "person" includes individuals partnerships, corporations, and associations. (June 5, 1939, sec. 2, 53 Stat. 809; 18 U. S. C., sec. 76d.)

1260_3. Impersonating officer, agent, or employee of the United States and making arrest or search.-Any officer, agent, or employee of the United States engaged in the enforcement of any law of the United States who shall search any private dwelling used and occupied as such dwelling without a warrant directing such search, or who, while engaged in such enforcement, shall without a search warrant maliciously and without reasonable cause search any other building or property, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction thereof shall be fined for a first offense not more than $1,000, and for a subsequent offense not more than $1,000, or imprisoned not more than one year, or both such fine and imprisonment: Provided, That nothing herein contained shall apply to any officer, agent, or employee of the United States serving a warrant of arrest, or arresting or attempting to arrest any person committing or attempting to commit an offense in the presence of such officer, agent, or employee, or who has committed, or who is suspected on reasonable grounds of having committed, a felony.

Whoever not being an officer, agent, or employee of the United States shall falsely represent himself to be such officer, agent, or employee, and in such assumed character shall arrest or detain any person or shall in any manner search the person, buildings, or other property of any person, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction thereof shall be punished by a fine of not more than $1,000 or imprisoned for not more than one year, or by both such fine and imprisonment. (Aug. 27, 1935, Title II, sec. 201, 49 Stat. 877; 18 U. S. C., sec. 77a.)

OFFENSES AGAINST PUBLIC JUSTICE

1299-1. Killing Federal officer; penalty.—That whoever shall kill, as defined in sections 273 and 274 of the Criminal Code, any United States Marshal or deputy of the United States marshal or person employed to assist a United States marshal or deputy United States marshal, any officer or employee of the Federal Bureau of Investigation of the Department of Justice, post-office inspector, Secret Service operative, any officer or enlisted man of the Coast Guard, any employee of any United States penal or correctional institution, any officer, employee, agent, or other person in the service of the customs or of the internal revenue, any immigrant inspector or any immigration patrol inspector, any officer or employee of the Department of Agriculture or of the Department of the Interior designated by the Secretary of Agriculture or the Secretary of the Interior to enforce any Act of Congress for the protection, preservation, or restoration of game and other wild birds and animals, any officer or employee of the National Park Service, any officer or employee of, or assigned to duty in, the field service of the Division of Grazing of the Department of the Interior, or any officer or employee of the Indian field service of the United States, while engaged in the per. formance of his official duties, or on account of the performance of his official duties, shall be punished as provided under section 275 of the Criminal Code. (May 18, 1934, 48 Stat. 780, as amended Feb. 8, 1936, 49 Stat. 1105; June 26, 1936, Title V, sec. 3, 49 Stat. 1940; June 13, 1940, 54 Stat. 391; 18 U.S. C., sec. 253.)

OFFENSES AGAINST FOREIGN AND INTERSTATE COMMERCE 1303. Importing injurious birds and animals; permits for foreign wild animals; specimens for museums.-[Functions of Secretary of Agriculture relating to conservation of wildlife, game, and migratory birds were transferred to Secretary of Interior by Reorganization Plan No. II, sec. 4(f) effective July 1, 1939, set out in paragraph 115–31 of this volume.] (Mar. 4, 1909, sec. 241, 35 Stat. 1137; 18 U.S.C., sec. 391 note.)

1307. Arrests and execution of search warrants; forfeiture of animals or birds unlawfully possessed.—[Functions of Secretary of Agriculture relating to conservation of wildlife, game, and migratory birds were transferred to Secretary of Interior by Reorganization Plan No. II, sec. 4(f) effective July 1, 1939, set out in paragraph 115–31 of this volume.] (June 15, 1935, sec. 202, Title II, sec. 202, 49 Stat. 391; 18 U.S. C., sec. 393a note.)

JUVENILE DELINQUENCY

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1312–1. Juvenile delinquents; definition. That for the purposes of this Act a “juvenile” is a person seventeen years of age or under, “juvenile delinquency” is an offense against the laws of the United States committed by a juvenile and not punishable by death or life imprisonment. (June 16, 1938, sec. 1, 52 Stat. 764; 18 U. S. C., sec. 921.)

1312–2. Prosecution as juvenile delinquent; consent of accused.—Whenever any juvenile is charged with the commission of any offense against the laws of the United States, other than an offense punishable by death or life imprisonment, and such juvenile is not surrendered to the authorities of any State, pursuant to the provisions of the Act of June 11, 1932 (47 Stat. 301; U. S. C., title 18, sec. 662a), he shall be prosecuted as a juvenile delinquent if the Attorney General in his discretion so directs and the accused consents to such procedure. In such event such person shall be prosecuted by information on the charge of juvenile delinquency, and no prosecution shall be instituted for the specific offense alleged to have been committed by him. The said consent required to be given by such juvenile shall be given by him in writing before a judge of the

district court of the United States having cognizance of the offense, who shall fully apprize the juvenile of his rights and of the consequences of such consent. (June 16, 1938, sec. 2, 52 Stat. 765; 18 Ù. S. C., sec. 922.)

1312–3. Jurisdiction; waiver of trial.— The district court of the United States having jurisdiction of the offense shall have jurisdiction to try persons prosecuted as juvenile delinquents. For such purposes the court may be convened at any time and place within the district, in chambers or otherwise. The trial shall be without a jury. The consent on the part of the juvenile to be prosecuted on a charge of juvenile delinquency shall be deemed a waiver of a trial by jury. (June 16, 1938, sec. 3, 52 Stat. 765; 18 U. S. C., sec. 923.)

1312-4. Probation; commitment to custody of Attorney General; support.-In the event that the court finds such juvenile guilty of juvenile delinquency, it may place him on probation under the provisions of the Act of March 4, 1925, as amended (43 Stat. 1259; U.S. C., title 18, secs. 724 to 728), except that the period of probation may include but may not exceed the minority of the delinquent; or it may commit the delinquent to the custody of the Attorney General for a period not exceeding his minority, but in no event exceeding the term for which the juvenile could have been sentenced if he had been tried and convicted of the offense which he had committed. The Attorney General may designate any public or private agency for the custody, care, subsistence, education, and training of the juvenile during the period for which he was committed. The cost of such custody and care may be paid from the appropriation for “Support of United States prisoners” or such other appropriation as the Attorney General may designate. (June 16, 1938, sec. 4, 52 Stat. 765; 18 U. S. C., sec. 924.)

1312–5. Notice of arrest; detention; bail.—Whenever a juvenile is arrested on a charge of having committed an offense against the laws of the United States, the arresting officer shall immediately notify the Attorney General of such fact. If such juvenile is not forthwith taken before a committing magistrate, he may be detained in such juvenile home or other suitable place of detention as the Attorney General may designate for such purposes, but shall not be detained in a jail or similar place of detention, unless, in the opinion of the arresting officer, such detention is necessary to secure the custody of such juvenile, or to insure his safety or that of others. In no case shall such detention be for a longer period than is necessary to produce such juvenile before a committing magistrate. The committing magistrate may release such juvenile on bail, upon his own recognizance or that of some responsible person, or in default of bail may commit him to the custody of the United States marshal, who shall lodge him in such juvenile home or other suitable place of detention as the Attorney General may designate for that purpose. Such juvenile shall not be committed to a jail cr other similar institution, unless in the opinion of the marshal it appears that such commitment is necessary to secure the custody of the juvenile or to insure his safety or that of others. A juvenile detained in a jail or similar institution shall be held in custody in a room or other place apart from adults if facilities for such segregation are available. (June 16, 1938, sec. 5, 52 Stat. 765; 18 U. S. C., sec. 925.)

CUSTOMS DUTIES

TARIFF ACT OF 1930

1315a. Animals imported for breeding purposes; stocking and noncommercial purposes; plants, etc., by Government.—That on and after the day following the passage of this Act (June 18, 1930], except as otherwise specially provided for in this Act, the articles mentioned in the following paragraphs, when imported into the United States or into any of its possessions (except the Philippine Islands, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Wake Island, Midway Islands, Kingman Reef, and the island of Guam), shall be exempt from duty: * * * (June 17, 1930, Title II, sec. 201, 46 Stat. 672; June 25, 1938, sec. 2, 52 Stat. 1077; 19 Ú. S. C., sec. 1201.)

1319–1. Importation of cattle, sheep, swine, and meats prohibited in certain cases.-(a) Rinderpest and foot-and-mouth disease.—If the Secretary of Agriculture determines that rinderpest or foot-and-mouth disease exists in any foreign country, he shall officially notify the Secretary of the Treasury and give public notice thereof, and thereafter, and until the Secretary of Agriculture gives notice in a similar manner that such disease no longer exists in such foreign country, the importation into the United States of cattle, sheep, or other domestic ruminants, or swine, or of fresh, chilled, or frozen beef, veal, mutton, lamb, or pork, from such foreign country, is prohibited.

(b) Meats unfit for human food.—No meat of any kind shall be imported into the United States unless such meat is healthful, wholesome, and fit for human food and contains no dye, chemical, preservative, or ingredient which renders such meat unhealthful, unwholesome, or unfit for human food, and unless such meat also complies with the rules and regulations made by the Secretary of Agriculture. All imported meats shall, after entry into the United States in compliance with such rules and regulations, be deemed and treated as domestic meats within the meaning of and subject to the provisions of the Act of June 30, 1906 (Thirty-fourth Statutes at Large, p. 674), commonly called the “Meat Inspection Amendment," and the Act of June 30, 1906 (Thirty-fourth Statutes at Large, p. 868), commonly called the "Food and Drugs Act," and Acts amendatory of, supplementary to, or in substitution for such Acts.

(c) Regulations. The Secretary of Agriculture is authorized to make rules and regulations to carry out the purposes of this section and in such rules and regulations the Secretary of Agriculture may prescribe the terms and conditions for the destruction of all cattle, sheep, and other domestic ruminants, and swine, and of all meats, offered for entry and refused admission into the United States, unless such cattle, sheep, domestic ruminants, swine, or meats be exported by the consignee within the time fixed therefor in such rules and regulations. (June 17, 1930, Title III, sec. 306, 46 Stat. 689; 19 U. S. C., sec. 1306.)

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