The Correspondence of Theodosius and Constantia: Before and After Her Taking the Veil; to which is Added The Country Justice, Volumes 1-2

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Page x - ... the name of father Francis, and was so far concealed in a long beard, a shaven head, and a religious habit, that it was impossible to discover the man of the world in the venerable conventual. As he was one morning shut up in his confessional...
Page xiii - It is enough, (says she,) Theodosius is still in being ; I shall live with comfort, and die in peace.
Page 127 - Cold on Canadian hills, or Minden's plain, Perhaps that parent wept her soldier slain — Bent o'er her babe, her eye dissolved in dew, The big drops, mingling with the milk he drew, Gave the sad presage of his future years, The child of misery baptized in tears.
Page xiv - She died soon after, and was interred according to her request. Their tombs are still to be seen, with a short Latin inscription over them to the following purpose: ' Here lie the bodies of father Francis and sister Constance. They were lovely in their lives, and in their deaths they were not divided.
Page 92 - If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, the things that belong unto thy peace ! but now they are hid from thine eyes.
Page 133 - The parish-officer ! — though verse disdain Terms that deform the splendour of the strain; It stoops to bid thee bend the brow severe On the sly, pilfering, cruel, overseer ; The shuffling farmer, faithful to no trust, Ruthless as rocks, insatiate as the dust...
Page ix - Constantia had determined to apply herself in confession, though neither she nor any other, besides the prior of the convent, knew any thing of his name or family. The gay, the amiable Theodosius had now taken upon him the name of Father Francis, and was so far concealed in a long beard, a shaven head, and a religious habit, that ifwas impossible to discover the man of the world in the venerable conventual.
Page 132 - Nor leave the head, that time hath whiten'd, bare To the rude insults of the searching air ; Nor bid the knee, by labour harden'd, bend, O thou, the poor man's hope, the poor man's friend ! If, when from heav'n severer seasons fall, Fled from the frozen roof and mouldering wall, Each face the picture of a winter day, More strong than Teniers...
Page 137 - Superior here the scene in evety part ! Here reigns great nature, and there little art! Here let thy life assume a nobler plan, To nature faithful, and the friend of man...
Page xi - Amidst the interruptions of his sorrow, seeing his penitent overwhelmed with grief, he was only able to bid her, from time to time, be comforted ; to tell her that her sins were forgiven her ; that her guilt wail not so great as she apprehended ; that she should not suffer herself to be afflicted above measure.

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