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Table 5.-TRANSFERRED SECTIONS Showing sections in title 14, U. S. C., 1946 edition, which have been transferred, or

recommended for transfer, to titles of the United States Code other than revised

tille 14 (The first column indicates the sections in title 14, U.S. C., 1946. The second column indicates the title

in the United States Code to which each has been transferred or recommended for transser]

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558 PROVIDING FOR THE CONVEYANCE OF CERTAIN LAND IN MIS

SOULA COUNTY, MONT., TO THE STATE OF MONTANA FOR THE

USE AND BENEFIT OF MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY MAY 10, 1949.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the State

of the Union and ordered to be printed Mr. PETERSON, from the Committee on Public Lands, submitted the

following REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 1720) The Committee on Public Lands, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 1720) to provide for the conveyance of certain land in Missoula County, Mont., to the State of Montana for the use and benefit of Montana State University, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with amendments and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.

The amendments are as follows:

Page 1, line 4, delete the word “donate" and substitute the word “sell”.

Page 1, line 4, after the word "convey" add the following: “, at 40 the value thereof fixed by the Secretary of the Interior,”.

Page 1, following line 13, add the following new section: Sec. 2. The patent issued under this Act shall contain a reservation to the United States of all mineral deposits in the lands and of the right to prospect for, mine, and remove the same under applicable laws and under regulations to be established by the Secretary.

EXPLANATION OF THE BILL The purpose of this bill, as amended, is to provide for the sale by the Federal Government to the State of Montana, approximately 200 acres of land in Missoula County, for the use of Montana State

Uni versity;

pers

The

Sit for forest nursery, botanical, biological and other purposes.
Federal Government is making no use of the land.

H. Repts., 81-1, vol. 3—53

The Department of the Interior has no objection to H. R. 1720, as amended. As originally introduced, the bill provided for the conveyance of the land without payment. The Department suggested that the land be sold by the Government at one-half the value fixed by the Secretary of the Interior, and the Committee has so amended the bill. Also suggested by the Department and adopted by the committee is an amendment providing for a reservation of minerals to the United States.

Pertinent comments from the Department's report are set forth below and made a part of this report:

I have no objection to the enactment of this bill if it is amended as hereinafter indicated. This special legislation would be unnecessary, however, if H. R. 2821, which passed the House of Representatives on April 4, 1949, becomes a law.

H. R. 1720 would direct the Secretary of the Interior to make the proposed conveyance without consideration. The lands involved were returned to this Department by War Assets Administration on April 27, 1948, after they were declared surplus by the Department of the Army to War Assets Administration on June 15, 1947.

The present public land policy with respect to disposals of public lands to local governments is set by the Recreation Act of June 14, 1926 (44 Stat. 741, 43 U.S. C. sec. 869). H. R. 2821, a bill to amend that act, is awaiting action in the Senate. One of the primary reasons for the proposed amendment of the 1926 act is to broaden the scope of the bill by permitting the acquisition of lands not only for recreational purposes but for any public purposes. If H. R. 2821 is enacted, the Secretary of the Interior could dispose of the lands to the State under this general legislation and the congressional policy manifested by the 1926 act as amended by H. R. 2821. It may be preferable, therefore, if action on H. R. 1720 is suspended until Congress has had a full opportunity to take action with respect to the general legislation embraced in H. R. 2821 to cover cases like this.

If Congress is nonetheless of the opinion that the proposed conveyance should be made to the State of Montana prior to action by the Senate on H. R. 2821, the language of H. R. 1720 should be amended to make the bill conform to the principles underlying the act, H. R. 2821, as passed by the House. H. R. 1720 should certainly be amended to require payment for the land by the State, especially since there is no provision in the bill which would require that the lands revert to the United States if not used for public purposes. Such an amendment would provide that the lands be sold to the State at a price to be fixed by the Secretary of the Interior, through appraisal or otherwise. This provision is taken from the 1926 act. H. R. 2821 would not change it. H. R. 1720 should also be amended to provide for a reservation of minerals to the United States in the form used in H. R. 2821 to make it clear that the mining operations on such lands would be authorized only under applicable law.

These amendments could be accomplished in the following manner:

At line 4, strike out the word “donate” and insert in lieu thereof the word "sell."

Add the following sections:

“Sec. 2. The land shall be sold at a price to be fixed by the Secretary of the Interior through appraisal, or otherwise.

“Sec. 3. The patent issued under this act shall contain a reservation to the United States of all mineral deposits in the lands and of the right to prospect for, mine, and remove the same under applicable laws and under regulations to be established by the Secretary.”

This legislation would have been unnecessary had the Senate passed H. R. 2821, which passed the House of Representatives on April 4, 1949. Since the Senate has not yet acted on H. R. 2821, however, and the need of the University of Montana is urgent, the Committee on Public Lands unanimously recommends the enactment of H. R. 1720, as amended.

O

COTTON STATISTICS

May 10, 1949.-Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the State

of the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. WILLIAMS, from the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service,

submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H, R. 3444)

The Committee on Post Office and Civil Service, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 3444) to provide for the collection and publication of cotton statistics, having considered the same, report favorably thereon without amendment and recommend that the bill do pass.

STATEMENT

This legislation is intended to improve the administration of activities relating to the collection of cotton statistics.

The bill provides for four changes in the act of April 2, 1924. The first of these changes deletes the word "calendar" in front of the word “month” in section 2 of the act of April 2, 1924. This amendment will make it possible for cotton mill operators to prepare their cotton consumption and mill activity reports on the basis of business months rather than calendar months. This change will remove the necessity of cotton mills keeping two sets of records in order to prepare census reports on cotton consumption and mill activity.

The second change removes language which is repetitive and no longer necessary.

The third change that this bill makes in the act of April 2, 1924, is to remove the mandatory provision of section 2, which requires that the Director of the Census mail copies of cotton reports to all cotton ginners, cotton manufacturers, and cotton warehousemen, and to all daily newspapers throughout the United States. This change would make it possible to limit the mailing of cotton reports to those who wish or need them and will prevent public criticism of the unnecessary distribution of governmental reports.

The fourth change is required to make the act of August 2, 1924, consistent with the provision of the act of August 8, 1946 (Public

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