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not available to processors. The waste and inefficiency commonly associated with small sawmills, of which there are over 40,000, could be greatly reduced through technical assistance in selection of equipment, mill lay-out, and operating and marketing methods.

An adequate program of this kind would require a corps of some 2,000 foresters. The authorization in section 4 would be sufficient, if matched by the States, to provide such a program in all States needing it.

Section 4 states that the bulk of the work provided for in this section is to be carried out through State forestry agencies, which means the State foresters or equivalent State officials. The general assignment of responsibility to the Secretary, however, will enable this Department to provide directly for such phases of the work as ordinarily would not or could not be handled through the States.

Section 5

As has been stated in the analysis of sections 2, 3, and 4, the programs authorized by those sections have been carried on in the past partly by means of the funds authorized in the Clarke-McNary Act and partly with funds authorized and appropriated pursuant to the Norris-Doxey Act, commonly known as the Cooperative Farm Forestry Act (50 Stat. 188; 16 U. S. C. 568b). The Norris-Doxey Act authorizes appropriation of as much as $2,500,000 a year, and the Department of Agriculture Appropriation Act for 1950 contains appropriations amounting to $950,534 pursuant to that authorization. This overlapping and duplication of authority has contributed an element of confusion and uncertainty to the cooperative forestry program. As in other cases of such overlapping authority, the committee is strongly of the opinion that any future legislation should seek to eliminate the duplication and place all the authority clearly in one act.

The authority previously contained in the existing sections of the Clarke-McNary Act and the Norris-Doxey Act, have now been consolidated, clarified, and combined by the committee into the sections of the Clarke-McNary Act amended by this bill. The Norris-Doxey Act, therefore, becomes superfluous legislation and is repealed by section 5 of the bill. Due to the fact that the budget for 1950 has been set up under the existing legislation and programs for that fiscal year have been planned on that basis, the section makes the repeal of the Norris-Doxey Act effective as of June 30, 1950, so that programs can be continued with appropriations made under that act during the fiscal year 1950 and ample time will be given for preparing new program and budget estimates for use in fiscal 1951 under the terms of this bill.

CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW In compliance with paragraph 2a of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, changes made by the bill are shown as follows (existing law proposed to be omitted is enclosed in brackets, new matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is proposed is shown in roman):

Act of June 7, 1924 (43 Stat. 659)

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Sec. 4. The Secretary of Agriculture is hereby authorized and directed to cooperate with the various States in the procurement, production, and distri.

bution of forest-tree seeds and plants, for the purpose of establishing forests, windbreaks, shelter belts, and farm wood lots upon denuded or nonforested lands within such cooperating States, under such conditions and requirements as he may prescribe to the end that forest-tree seeds or plants so procured, produced, or distributed shall be used effectively for planting denuded or nonforested lands in the cooperating States and growing timber thereon. The amount expended by the Federal Government in cooperation with any State during any fiscal year for such purposes shall not exceed the amount expended by the State for the same purposes during the same fiscal year, and the Secretary of Agriculture is authorized to make expenditures on the certificate of the State official having charge of the cooperative work for the State that State expenditures as provided for in this section have been made. There is hereby authorized to be appropriated (annually, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, not more than $100,000] to enable the Secretary of Agriculture to carry out the provisions of this section not more than $1,000,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1950; $1,500,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1951; $2,000,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1952; and $2,500,000 for each subsequent fiscal year.

Sec. 5. The Secretary of Agriculture is hereby authorized and directed, in cooperation with [appropriate officials] the land grant colleges and universities of the various States or, in his discretion, with other suitable agencies, to [assist the owners of farms] aid farmers through advice, education, demonstrations, and other similar means in establishing, [improving, and] renewing, protecting, and managing wood lots, shelter belts, windbreaks, and other valuable forest growth, and in [growing and renewing useful timber crops] harvesting, utilizing, and marketing the products thereof. Except for preliminary investigations, the amount expended by the Federal Government under this section in cooperation with any State or other cooperating agency during any fiscal year shall not exceed the amount expended by the State or other cooperating agency for the same purpose during the same fiscal year, and the Secretary of Agriculture is authorized to make expenditures on the certificate of the appropriate State official that the State expenditures, as provided for in this Section, have been made. There is hereby authorized to be appropriated annually out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, not more than [$100,000) $500,000 to enable the Secretary of Agriculture to carry out the provisions of this section.

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Sec. 10. (a) The Secretary of Agriculture is hereby authorized and directed to establish and maintain services and facilities for furnishing technical guidance and assistance respecting the proper management of privately owned forest lands and federally owned lands administered by the States; for giving technical guidance and assistance to forest-land owners concerning the value of their forest products and the eficient production and marketing thereof; for assisting forest owners and processors in redvcing limber harvesting and processing costs, utilizing inferior species and grades, improving the quality and expanding the uses of forest products, establishing markets, and developing rural forest industries; for giving technical guidance and assistance to consumers with respect to the selection and use of forest products; and for otherwise effecting improvements in the growing, harvesting, marketing, and utilization of forest products.

(6) The Secretary of Agriculture is authorized under such terms and conditions as he deems appropriate to cooperate with State forestry agencies in carrying out the purposes of this section and in promoting its objectives. The amount expended in any State by the Federal Government through such cooperative action shall not exceed during any fiscal year the amount expended by the cooperating State for the same purpose during the same fiscal year, and the Secretary of Agriculture is authorized to make expenditures on the certificate of the appropriate State official having charge of the cooperative work for the State that State expenditures as provided in this section have been made.

"(c) The Secretary of Agriculture is further authorized, under such terms and conditions as he may deem appropriate to cooperate with public and private agencies and persons to oblain assistance in carrying out the purposes of this section. Money contributions received from cooperators shall be covered into the Treasury and shall constitute a special fund, which is hereby appropriated and made available until erpended as the Secretary may direct for conducting activities authorized by this section and for making refunds to contributors of amounts paid by them in excess of their share of the cost of cooperative work.

d) There is hereby authorized to be appropriated to enable the Secretary of Agriculture to carry out the provisions of this section the following sums: $1,500,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1950: $3,000,000 for the fiscal year ending June

30, 1951; $4,500,000 for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1952; and $6,000,000 for each subsequent fiscal year.

Act of May 18, 1937 (50 Stat. 188; 16 U. S. C. 5686) [To authorize cooperation in the development of farm forestry in the States and Territories, and for other

purposes

[Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That in order to aid agriculture, increase farmforest income, conserve water resources, increase employment, and in other ways advance the general welfare, and improve living conditions on farms through reforestation and afforestation in the various States and Territories, the Secre 21 tary of Agriculture is authorized in cooperation with the land-grant colleges and universities and State forestry agencies, each within its respective field of activities, according to the statutes, if any, of the respective States, wherever such agencies can and will cooperate, or in default of such cooperation to act directly, to produce or procure and distribute forest trees and shrub planting stock; to make necessary investigations; to advise farmers regarding the establishment, protcction, and management of farm forests and forest and shrub plantations and the harvesting, utilization and marketing of the products thereof; and to enter into cooperative agreements for the establishment, protection, and care of farmor other forest-land tree and shrub plantings within such States and Territories; and, whenever suitable Government-owned lands are not available, to lease, purchase, or accept donations of land and develop nursery sites for the production of such forest planting stock as is needed to effectuate the purposes of this Act, but not including ornamental or other stock for landscape plantings commonly grown by established commercial nurserymen, and no stock grown in Government and cooperating nurseries shall be allowed to enter regular trade channels. No ! cooperative reforestation or afforestation shall be undertaken pursuant to this Act unless the cooperator makes available without charge the land to be planted. There is hereby authorized to be appropriated annually not to exceed $2,500,000 for carrying out the purposes of this Act. This Act shall be known as the Cooperative Farm Forestry Act.]

O

1st Session

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No. 537

AMENDING THE CIVIL SERVICE RETIREMENT ACT SO AS TO MAKE SUCH ACT APPLICABLE TO THE OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES OF THE COLUMBIA INSTITUTION FOR THE DEAF

MAY 9, 1949.—Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the State of

the Union and ordered to be printed

Mr. CROOK, from the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service,

submitted the following

REPORT

(To accompany H. R. 86)

The Committee on Post Office and Civil Service, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 86) to amend the Civil Service Retirement Act so as to make such act applicable to the officers and employees of the Columbia Institution for the Deaf, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with amendments and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.

The amendments are as follows:

(a) On page 1, lines 8 and 9, strike out the following: at the election of such officers and employees as herein provided

(6) Strike out section 2 in its entirety.

(c) On page 2, line 13, strike out “SEC. 3." and insert "Sec. 2.", and on page 2, line 18, strike out "Sec. 4.” and insert "Sec. 3.”.

PURPOSE OF AMENDMENTS

The purpose of amendments (a) and (6) is to remove the optional provision in the bill so that employees of the Columbia Institution for the Deaf are mandatorily covered under the Civil Service Retirement Act.

Amendment (c) is a perfecting amendment which simply renumbers the sections in conformity with the above amendments.

STATEMENT

The purpose of this bill is to amend the Civil Service Retirement Act of May 29, 1930, as amended, to make the provisions of such act applicable to officers and employees of the Columbia Institution for the Deaf.

The Columbia Institution for the Deaf was created as a nonprofit corporation by an act of February 16, 1857. Additional legislation in 1898 and 1921 authorizes the directors of the Institution to have control of all moneys appropriated by Congress for the benefit of the Institution and the accounts are settled and adjusted in the General Accounting Office as required by law.

An act of March 4, 1911, provides that no real or personal property held or acquired by the Columbia Institution for the Deaf shall be devoted to any other purpose than the education of the deaf or dumb and nontransferred or sold except by the authority of Congress. This act further provided that the Superintendent of the Institution shall make a full and complete statement of all the expenditures made by virtue of any appropriation by Congress. The President and directors of the Institution furnish the Federal Security Administrator an annual report showing the condition of the Institution, receipts and their sources, and disbursements. A proposed budget is also submitted to the Federal Security Administrator which clears through the Bureau of the Budget.

Hearings were conducted, at which time representatives of the Civil Service Commission, the Government Employees Council, the American Federation of Government Employees, and the Association of Retired Federal Employees endorsed this legislation.

The Committee believes this legislation is meritorious. In extending the rights and benefits of the Civil Service Retirement Act to the 95 employees of the Institution, the Federal Government is assuming its rightful obligation. Virtually all of the salaries of these employees are paid by Federal funds appropriated by Congress for the specific purpose of maintaining the Institution. The work of the employees is so closely allied to and associated with the Federal Government and the District of Columbia Government as to constitute them Federal employees.

The worth-while objectives of the Columbia Institution for the Deaf are a matter of record and the great service the Institution performs is well known. At present there are approximately 200 pupils in the Gallaudet College and 82 in the Kendall School. There are 30 teachers and 65 other employees at the Institution. The Bureau of the Budget has established a ceiling of 100 employees and the annual pay roll for these employees is approximately $254,000. According to computations of the Retirement Division of the Civil Service Commission, the cost to the Civil Service Retirement System of bringing these employees under the Retirement Act will be approximately $16,500 annually. There are not more than a dozen employees at the Institution who presently are of retirement age.

The bill as introduced would bring the officers and employees of the Columbia Institution for the Deaf under the provisions of the civil-service retirement system at the election of such officers and employees. The committee, by amendments set forth above, eliminated this optional provision and made it mandatory for such employees to receive the benefits of the Civil Service Retirement Act in the same manner as other Federal employees in the executive branch of the Government.

Section 4 of the bill provides that any service rendered prior to the effective date of the act as an officer or employee of the Institution shall be considered creditable service. This means that officers and

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