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C Ο Ν Τ Ε Ν Τ S.
Page

Page Register of the Weather for No. the top of the Alps, &c. By vember

290

the Abbé Spallarzani Anecdote from Memoirs of Present flourishing State of the Count B * * *

291
National Fisheries

342 On the Difference of Colour in On the Influence of Electricity

the Inhabitants of Different on Vegetables Vegetation Climates, by R. Clarkson 297

most luxuriant when ThunExperiments and Observations der abounds-when an earth

on the Singing of Birds---Birds quake has happened-and in havt not any innate ideas of the neighbourhood of Voltheir peculiar fong-From canoesElectricity has pow. what circumstances they fix er over the Motions of Vegeupon any particular fong

tables---as in the Sensitive Why finging is confined to Plant, and others-is the the cocks of a few species-

cause of the Light that pro. Table of the comparative me.

ceeds from the Indian Cresi, rit of Singing Birds--The &c. By the Abbé Berthelon 345 European birds fuperior to Critical Remarks on the last eall others; &c. By the Hon. dition of Shakespeare, by Daines Barrington

303
Johnson and Steevens

354 On the Pains and Pleasures of Another Answer to the ReResidence in the Country

marks on Scotticisms and ProAnswer to Remarks on some vinical Expressions

Provincial Expressions 318 Answer to a Query concerning a A Character of the Creoles of Print of James I of Scot

St Doming. By M. Mo- land; by the Right Hon.
reau de St Mery

319
the Earl of Buchan

364 Pogonologia, or Anecdotes of Literary Intelligence; commuBeard's

325

nicated by a Correspondent 364 Observations on the Produce and Curious Description of the PerCommerce of Nova Scotia 333

son of William 1. Prince of Remarks on the

Orange. By Sir Fulk Greville 365 Fog of the year 1783-A Poems by Robert Burns Grand Phenomenon defcri. Fragment of a Poem on Fishing; bed Observations on Thun. by John Gay. Never before der Storms, as tben isen from published

314

362

uncommon

364

368

A STATE of the BAROMETER in inches and decimals, and of t'a

renheit's THERMOMETER, in the open air, taken before sunrise, and the quantity of rain-water fallen, in inches and decimals, from the zoth of Oct. 1786 to the zoth of Nov. 1786, near the foot of Arthur's Seat.

Days Ther.

Weather

Rain.
Inch.
0.0292
0.1706
0.0146

in 3456 78 99

0.0438

39 39 41 37 38 37 34 35 33 39 37 35 33 35 30 27 35 35

0.0146
0.0146
0.0365

12

0.073

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Barom.

Inch.
30.15
29.2
29.975
29.9
30.
30.079
30.3
29.2
30.3
30.03
29.975
30.30
30.05
29.9025
29.895
29.437
29.225
29.225
29.45
29.05
295
29.8
29.725
29.75
29.88
29.65
29.4
29 51
19.225
29.725

Rain.
Rain.
Ditto,
Cloudy,
Ditto.
Rain.
Cloudy,
Clear.
Rain.
Ditto,
Ditto.
Clear.
Small showers.
Clear.
Ditto.
Ditto.
Ditto.
Ditto.
Sleet and rain.
Cloudy.
Ditto.
Clear.
Sleet and rain.
Cloudy.
Ditto.
Ditto.
Small showers.
Cloudy.
Showers.
Rain.

0.0219

35 33 36

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17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

34 35

0.075

38

40 35 37 46 44 39

0.0075

28

0.0146
0.0703

0.5840 total rain. THERMOMETER.

BAROMETER. 27-49 greatest height.

8--30.3 greatest height, 15~27 leaf height before sun risc.

19.-29.05 leaft height,

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L

ter.

INLITHGOW is fupposed to be the Lindum of Ptolemy, and to take its name from its situation on a lake, or lin, or llyn, which the

word lin, or llyn, signifies. The castle was founded by Edward I. who resided in it for a whole win

But in 1307, we find that it was taken and demolished by one Binny, a Scotsman. In the reign of Edward III. the English poffeffed it again : for there is extant an order for the custody of the hospital to John Swanlard *.

It is at present a magnificent edifice, of a square form, finely feated da bove the lake. James V. and VI. ornamented it greatly. The inside is much embellished with sculpture ; over an inner gate are niches, in former times holding the ftatues of a Pope and a Cardinal ; erected, as tradition says, by James V. in compliment to his holiness for a present of a confecrated sword and helmet to' On an outward gate, detached from the building, are the four orders of knighthood, which his Majesty bore, the garter, thiftle, holy-ghoft, and golden fleece,

Within the palace is a handsome square: one fide is more modern that the others, having been built by James VI. and kept in good repair, till 1746, when it was accidentally burnt by the King's forces. The pediments over the windows are neatly carved, and dated 1619.

The other fides are more ancient : in one is a room ninety-five feet long; thirty feet fix inches wide, and thirty three high. At one end is a gal. fery, with three arches, perhaps for music. Narrow galleries run quite found the old part, to preserve communications with the rooms ; in one of which the unfortunate Mary Stuart first saw light. Her father, James V. then dying, foretold the miseries that impended over her and the kingdoms

It came,' said he, with a lass, and will be lost with one."

The chapel was built by James V. and takes up one side of the squares "The kitchen for the Use of the Kings and Queens is below ground.

The church would be a handfome building, if not disgraced with a most ruinous foor. I was shown the place remarkable for the perforated appatition that appeared to James IV. while he was meditating the fatal expedition into England; and which, as honelt Lindsay relates, as soon as it had delivered its message, vanished like a blink of the fun, or a whip of a whirlwind.'

In one of the streets is shown the gallery from whence Hamilton of Botho wel haugh, ia 1570, shot the Regent Murray.

Pennants

Anecdote from the Memoirs of Court de B. TN a long and bloody war, wherein the Count de B. generously served IN

two polite nations frequently dif- his country, with all his fortune, regarded the principles of humanity, with courage, and ability. He was

the * Calendar of Charters, by Sir Joseph Ayloffe, 162. 1 Lefly, Hif. Scot. 353.

Efais par Bonneville

oo 2

arms.

the only general who was feared and with an elegant hall. The large yet respected. The very enemies, who walls of this apartment required fied before him, were forced to ac. pictures ;« and the Colonel conceived knowledge his talents for war and the the happy idea of enriching them greatness of his soul. They even with the heroic actions of his father, loved him ; for the same man whose Scenes of this kind, said he to him. look inspired terror in the heat of self, are preferable to the cold relathe action, was full of compassion tions of history which affect not the and fenfibility when he had gained soul, and they will do more honour the victory. Women and children, to my father than the family tree of the aged and the industrious, had no- his ancestors. The best artists were thing to fear from the rage or sapine engaged ; and as they were certain of his soldiers. He considered no man of a reward, and of employing their as an enemy who did not appear in talents on objects worthy of their la

And his good conduct after bour, they took pleasure in their a victory, was generally more useful work, and called forth all their pow. and honourable to his country than ers. the victory itself.

In one place he was seen throw. The Count was now advanced in ing his colours into the middle of the years, honoured, and rich; with enemy's cavalry; and by this bold sufficient ease to enjoy the comforts action giving new courage to his of his situation. He had received the soldiers, who were exhausted with laftaff of Field Marshal, and a pension, bour, and yielding on all sides to a on which he passed the best part of fuperior force. his time in the country.

A few In another place, he wasfeen storme months in the year he appeared at ing a city, the first man who entered court, where he was still consulted the breach ; and while he feemed to by his prince ; respected by the cour. forget that he was general, giving tiers and the best characters in the a good example to his followers. nation ; and where the soldier called Again he appears rushing on the him father. At the same time he enemy, who had surprised his Prince preferred the little endearments of while he was hunting, and delivering domestic life to the splendour of a him from their hands.

His family confifted of two At a greater distance he was shown daughters and a son. The educa- receiving a carte blanche from his tion of the former had been his stu- fovereign and a Marshal's Staff. dy and delight, and they were both On another field of battle they married with men of good sense and represented him falling wounded reputation. The son, who was Colonel from his horse, and pointing out of a regiment, received a large for the weakest place of the enemy as he tune by his wife, and an estate in the fell. neighbourhood of his fathers. He At length he was represented fignfollowed his footsteps with the great ing that desirable peace which gave est attention, and his .zeal was not happiness and plenty to his country, without success.

long harrassed with war. The father loved the son with In a word, although his son bad much tenderness, and the son return taken care ito avoid excessive flattery, ed it with the greateit respect. He yet the walls of this apartment were made great improvements in the altogether covered with the glorious castle of the young Count; he added actions of this venerable old man. . a wing to it, which was ornamented All was conducted with the greate

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court

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