International Co-operation in Civil and Criminal Matters

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 2002 - Law - 449 pages
For over a century states have co-operated in providing evidence for use in civil trials in other countries. The growth of international crimes such as drug-trafficking, money-laundering, terrorism, and insider-trading now pose a substantial threat to the economies and stabilities of states, and governments and international organizations have been quick to expand past civil law experience into a variety of responses - both diplomatic and institutional - to the new international crimes. This new edition draws on recent international events, new legislation, and important developments under the aegis of the EC, but retains an important awareness of both civil and criminal dimensions. It will be a useful book to litigation professionals, legislators, and policy-makers.

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Contents

Table of Cases
xvii
Table of Legislation
xxxi
Table of Conventions and Treaties
xxxviii
Introduction
3
PROCEDURES
11
Service of Process 11
44
National Practices
77
International Cooperation
103
Telecommunications
188
The Commonwealth Scheme
196
United Nations Action
213
Convention against Transnational Organized
221
Cooperation between Securities Regulatory
237
Drug Trafficking
245
Money Laundering
261
Terrorism
289

Letters of Request
108
Taking of Evidence by Diplomatic Officers
126
American Approaches to the Hague Convention
133
Council Regulation No 12062001
143
Origins
153
International Texts
171
The Proceeds of Crime
301
United Kingdom Legislation and Treaties
327
The Recognition and Enforcement of Criminal
365
Appendix of Selected Documents
383
Index
433
Copyright

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About the author (2002)


David McClean regularly works as an adviser to the Commonwealth Secretariat, work which relates to international co-operation both in civil justice and in the fight against international organised crime. He is Dean of the Faculty of Law at the University of Sheffield, having joined the Department after studying at Oxford. He was Pro-Vice-Chancellor of the University from 1991 to 1996. Professor McClean is the country's leading expert in civil aviation law and also a leading private international lawyer.

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