Spaceflight and the Myth of Presidential Leadership

Front Cover
Roger D. Launius, Howard E. McCurdy
University of Illinois Press, 1997 - Political Science - 262 pages

Setting the tone for the collection,
NASA chief historian Roger D. Launius and Howard McCurdy maintain that
the nation's presidency had become imperial by the mid-1970s and that
supporters of the space program had grown to find relief in such a presidency,
which they believed could help them obtain greater political support and
funding. Subsequent chapters explore the roles and political leadership,
vis--vis government policy, of presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy,
Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan.
 

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Spaceflight and the myth of presidential leadership

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For over 30 years space advocates have looked to strong presidential leadership in space policy as the sine qua non of forwarding their space exploration agendas. Kennedy's bold decision to race the ... Read full review

Spaceflight and the myth of presidential leadership

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

For over 30 years space advocates have looked to strong presidential leadership in space policy as the sine qua non of forwarding their space exploration agendas. Kennedy's bold decision to race the ... Read full review

Contents

The Imperial Presidency in the History of Space Exploration
The Reluctant Racer Eisenhower and US Space Policy
7
Kennedy and the Decision to Go to the Moon
43
Johnson Project Apollo and the Politics of Space Program Planning
60
The Presidency Congress and the Deceleration of the US Space Program in the 1970s
84
Politics Not Science The US Space Program in the Reagan and Bush Years
125
Presidential Leadership and International Aspects of the Space Program
164
National Leadership and Presidential Power
197
Beyond NASA Exceptionalism
213
Contributors
243
Index
247
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