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Mr. Horan. It belongs to Congress; it is our institution. not have this transfer of funds.

Dr. Evans. I will run the Library of Congress the way you want it run but in the past you have approved our securing transferred funds.

Mr. Horan. Constitutionally it is not right. Are those transfers from the judiciary? I suppose some are.

Dr. Evans. They are from the executive branch, mostly defense agencies. Congress authorized such transfers in the Economy Act of 1932.

Mr. HORAN. I wish you would avoid it. We are supposed to have separation of powers. How can you mix this all in one budget?

Let us get back on this statement. You are doing a good job, but
do not get me started on something that I think is basically wrong
and even as far as the Constitution is concerned is wrong.
accepting funds from the executive department, that just ruins this
whole thing.
Mr. CLAPP. Mr. Chairman, may I continue the discussion?
You have, in the past, in meetings like this when we have asked for
money to do a particular job and you asked us why we wanted to do
the job and we have told you that other agencies of the Government
needed that sort of work done, you have suggested that we get the
other agencies to pay for it. Now this is exactly what is happening.
The other agencies are paying here by transferring funds to us, for
this work which they vitally need.

Mr. Horan. We annually review the relationship between the
Library of the Department of Agriculture, for instance, and the
Library of Congress, and we understand that there is a very amicable
relationship there and that you have an exchange of information but
to my knowledge, there is no exchange of funds.
Dr. Evans. No transfer of funds in that case.
Mr. HORAN. I want the Library of Congress to be as useful as pos-
sible, but when it comes to the transfer of funds, I want the Library
of Congress to be independent and I want it to be the agent and the
servant of the Congress.
Mr. ClApp. We would like nothing better.
Mr. Horan. And particularly the House of Representatives because
we represent 158 million people and we are working at it, and you are
supposed to be the Library of Congress, not the library of the executive
department. I have labored this thing too much, and I apologize, but
I do not like this transfer of funds between the three separated powers
of our Government. If the Congress approved that in the past, I am
sorry. Probably, Ernest Griffith, you should hove pointed out to the
Members through the Legislative Reference Service that it should not
happen.
Mr. Griffith. We never make recommendations.
Mr. Horan. If you counsel with those who wrote that bill

Dr. EVANS. Mr. Chairman, I will just say a final word on this subject and that is that we wish to carry out the will of the Congress on this matter. We certainly will do the best we can to accomplish that.

Another way we have met our financial difficulties is by limiting the purchase of books. In some respects, we are falling behind.

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USE TO BE MADE OF FUNDS REQUESTED

Now as to the estimates we have asked you for this year, these amount to only 6.7 percent increase in our base figure which we take from 1953 to go into 1954; 16 percent of this total of 6.7 percent is to meet statutory increases; 6 percent is for operations which will reimburse their cost and even return a profit to the Treasury; 22 percent is for the blind; 11 percent is for the Legislative Reference Service, on which the Committees on Administration of the two Houses worked with Dr. Griffith. This leaves only 45 percent of this 6.7 percent or $284,000 for what I have been calling central operations. Of this amount, $77,000 is for nonpersonnel items, and the other is for personnel.

I think, gentlemen, this is a modest request. It does not reflect our total need to carry out what we understand to be the policy directives that the Congress has given us in past years. We wish to run the Library at whatever level the Members of Congress wish it to be operated. We are merely discribing what we think are some of the minimum needs to go ahead on the basis that we think you have decided. Hence, what we suggest should be done is technical information more than it is a policy recommendation.

Mr. HORAN. Are there any questions from members of the committee?

ADDITIONAL EMPLOYEES REQUESTED Mr. Gary. How many additional employees are you requesting?

Dr. EVANS. Mr. Chairman and Mr. Gary, the number is 86 on the major appropriation, 10 on Copyright, 20 on Legislative Reference Service, and on the Card Division it is 8, making a total of 124.

Mr. Chairman, I think the best way to proceed is for me to answer questions. I do not think I ought to ask the committee to let me give all of this material in detail.

Mr. HORAN. You were talking about the justifications now. My clerk is back now and we will proceed in order if you do not mind. Are there any further questions at this time from the subcommittee?

Mr. BUSBEY. Not on the general statement.

Mr. Horan. If not, we will begin with the justifications and Dr. Evans may handle this in any way that he wishes.

SUMMARY OG REQUEST

Table I may be inserted in the record at this point. (Table I is as follows:)

Table 1.- Appropriations for 1953 as related to appropriation base for 1954 and to

consolidation of appropriations

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Dr. Evans. Mr. Chairman, there was an overappropriation to the Legislative Reference Service last year which explains the footnote in the first column on this page. We are living in a way that Congress intended for us to, although the enrolled bill had a numerical error in it. We are proposing here certain transfers from one appropriation to another to get them straightened out. The budget as it is printed showed $5,000 of travel transferred out of increase general into salaries and expenses

, Copyright Office, and $2,500 to the Legislative Reference Service, but did not show the reduction which we intended of $7,500 in the main appropriation, but that has been corrected in the documents before you.

Mr. Horan. What is the total appropriation for the Library of Congress before this subcommittee?

Dr. Evans. $10,042,460 is our estimate. Mr. Horan. What is the total appropriation for the Library of Congress including all transfers and all other remunerations. Dr. Evans. The table 1 shows the appropriation for 1953 which is $9,416,128.

FUNDS TRANSFERRED TO LIBRARY FROM OTHER GOVERNMENT

AGENCIES

The amount of transferred funds from the Government I believe is shown in one of the tables.

Mr. HORAN. $2,200,000. Would you discuss that?

Dr. Evans. These transfers are from the Air Force and the Navy and a small amount from the State Department and the Army.

Mr. HORAN. Would you give us the exact amounts?
Mr. Rossiter. From the Air Force there was $1,266,079.
Dr. Evans. This is fiscal 1953?

Mr. Rossiter. Yes, sir, received in fiscal 1953. From the Department of Defense, $314,698. From the Navy, $586,903, and from the Army engineers, $63,800.

Mr. Horan. Last year I had you give us all the libraries with whom you had contact and as I remember, Mr. Clapp, that was a great many.

Mr. CLAPP. One thousand two hundred libraries, sir.

Mr. Horan. In this connection, we are trying to be friendly here; we just want to get at the facts and you understand our job, the pressures we are under. You are doing a nice job over there. But how much do these departments and divisions of Government that transfer funds to you, how much do they appropriate for library purposes on their own?

Dr. EVANS. We can get that figure, Mr. Chairman. But I would like to call your attention to the fact that most of the work we do for them is not the kind of work their libraries would do.

Mr. HORAN. That is all right. I do not object to that.
Dr. Evans. We will be glad to get you those figures.
(The requested information follows:)

Research and reference libraries maintained by agencies that transferred funds to the Library of Congress in fiscal 1953

Agency

Facilities

Library costs

Remarks

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None
Costs are not available in

Washington but must be
secured from each installa-
tion.

Transfers to the Library of Congress are for projects which

require scaree language skills, wide experience in organiz-
ing large-scale bibliographical and research programs,
and ready access to extensive research collections and
bibliographical apparatus.

Navy.

Costs are not available to

the Library of Congress,

Transfers to the Library of Congress are for following
projects:
(i) Office of Naval Research. For the provision of

advanced bibliographical and documentation

services in the fields of science and technology.
(2) Bureau of Aeronautics. A short-term project to

catalog and classify their collection of some 5,000
titles according to Library of Congress methods,
which the Bureau will thereafter maintain.

Has no central library; uses Army library in Pentagon..
Has a number of technical libraries at various installa-

tions-e. g., at Air Materiel Command, Dayton; Air
University, Maxwell Field; etc.-which serve the
ordinary research purposes of the installations but are
limited in scope to those purposes.
(Also has a number of post, camp, and station libraries

(recreational and instructional) for enlisted personnel;
these are not research libraries.)
Has a central library which specializes only in naval

history and science (approximately 92,000 volumes).
A number of bureaus in Washington also have technical

libraries-e. g., Bureau of Yards and Docks library,
Bureau of Supplies and Accounts library, ete.-which
serve the ordinary research purposes of those Bureaus
but are limited in scope to those purposes. Sponsors of
projects at the Library of Congress are:
Office of Naval Research-has no separate library.

Bureau of Aeronautics-has a small library.
Like the Air Force, Navy also has a number of technical

libraries at various installations, 0.g., Naval Academy,
etc., which serve the ordinary research purposes of the
installations but are limited in scope to those purposes.
(Also has base and ship libraries, recreational and instruc-

tional for enlisted personnel; these are not research

libraries.)
Has a central library which specializes in current materials

necessary for the information of the Department, especi.
ally military documents, military law, etc. (approxi-

mately 400,000 volumes).
Also maintains in Washington the Armed Forces Medical

Library, a special library in the field of medical sciences.
Like Air Force and Navy, also maintains a number of

technical libraries at various installations which serve
the ordinary research purposes of the installations but
are limited in scope to those purposes, e. g., Snow, Ice,
and Permafrost Research Establishment, Corps of Engi-
neers, Wilmette, III., has a library of less than 2,000 items

staffed by I librarian and I typist.
(Also has a number of post, camp, and station libraries

(recreational and instructional) for enlisted personnel; these are not research libraries.)

Costs are not available in

Washington but must be
secured from each instal-
lation

Army.

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