Page images
PDF
EPUB

OTHER GOVERNMENT PRINTING OPERATIONS

Mr. HORAN. For the information of the subcommittee, I do not know whether it was on this subcommittee or that for the Department of Commerce, but we got into a discussion on this whole matter of public printing. Actually, you only do about one-fourth of the total amount of obligations that are incurred by the Government for printing purposes. And, in addition to that most of the departments have a small print shop of their own, is that not true?

Mr. COLE. Yes, sir; a great many of them get special dispensation to use parts of their funds for commercial purchases on their own for field printing and printing that has a particular bearing in a particular area, such as the Map Service and the Air Force at Dayton, Ohio. They contract for a lot of their charts and maps directly in the St. Louis area and around those areas because of the peculiar nature of the work. Those funds are approved by the Joint Committee on Printing; that is, permission to use those funds for that purpose is granted by the Joint Committee. But there are a great many dollars in Government printing that are spent through printing plants in the various agencies. We have been asked to guess how much and we have said, approximately three times as much as we do. If we do $100 million in business, may be the total is $300 million, but we have no possible way of knowing because the requisitions do not come through our Office.

Mr. HORAN. I realize that. Several years ago we attempted to find out what the total was. I believe it was an informed guess that it was in excess of $350 million at that time. The total amount of printing that the Government contracted for.

Mr. Cole. That is right.

Mr. HORAN. Actually, your total amount available for obligation last year or fiscal 1952 was $103 million, was it not?

Mr. Gary. My only point is that what we are trying to do now is to improve our accounting and budgeting procedures and I think that all the departments and agencies of Government should conform as far as possible to a uniform system and we have set up the machinery whereby a uniform system may, we hope, be possible of attainment. I just want to see this agency cooperate in that program as the other agencies are doing. Mr. HORAN. Apparently they are moving in that direction.

Mr. Gary. I was glad to hear them say that they had prepared their figures and I think the thing to do is to have them get together with the staff now and work it out. That was the only thing with the staff of the Appropriation Committee, and work out a business budget.

TOTAL OBLIGATIONS Mr. Horan. In order to complete the hearings, without objection I would like to have page 125 put in the record, just the top part of it, I think, because that gives in brief the obligations and I think outlines pretty well what the Public Printer or the GPO has been doing.

Without objection, that will be done.
(The portion of page 125 referred to is as follows:)

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Pular Ohio.

NOTE.- Reimbursements from non-Federal sources above are from sales of waste paper, other waste material, and condemned property, and for losses or damages to Government property (64 Stat. 607).

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[ocr errors]

Mr. Horan. So what we actually are considering here is the Government Printing Office in total but the amounts before us only refer to the obligations that refer to the legislative branch. That is what we are discussing here.

CONGRESSIONAL RECORD

[ocr errors][ocr errors]

Would you continue with the Congressional Record? Mr. Cole. We have here a table which is page 2 in your justifications. I am sure all of you have that. Then we take each item. There is a short paragraph on each item in here. I would like to read that into the record.

Jr. HORAN. We can read that into the record. Mr. Cole. If we move over to page 3, we will have simple paragraphs justifying each of the items on the table that appear on page 2.

Congressional Record: The proceedings of the Senate and House of Representatives are printed daily in the Congressional Record. Approximately 39,000 copies are printed daily and distributed as provided by law, and are charged to the appropriation for printing

of

[ocr errors][ocr errors]

for Congress.

GOVERNMENT SALE OF ENVELOPES

Mr. HORAN. There is one question J have to ask and that is that I have received letters from quite a number of my constituents who do printing, objecting to the Government selling envelopes at less than cost. This is an old one. I know that. I am inclined to think it is valid.

I understand there is legislation that touches on this matter now pending before the House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service.

Mr. COLE. That is the committee it belongs before because we do not sell the envelope. It is done through contractual arrangements by the Post Office. They are preprinted envelopes, printed in course of manufacture.

Mr. Gary. I happen to know that that is under consideration because I am on the subcommittee handling Post Office appropriation and that was discussed with them and they have it under consideration.

Mr. HORAN. In no way do we want the GPO to interfere

Mr. BLATTENBERGER. Čoming out of industry, I know that to be true; I have heard that many, many times.

M1. HORAN. I understand that it is under consideration and that some action may be taken. I did not know at that time whether the GPO did any of that printing or not. I am glad that is cleared up.

DETAILED JUSTIFICATIONS

Mr. GARY. Mr. Chairman might we have the balance of the statement inserted in the record?

Mr. Horan. That may be done.
(The statement referred to is as follows:)

SUMMARY OF APPROPRIATION ESTIMATES FOR WORKING CAPITAL AND CONGRESSIONAL PRINTING AND BINDING, GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, FISCAL YEAR 1954

The estimates for working capital and congressional printing and binding for the Government Printing Office are to provide funds from which will be paid the cost of printing and binding required for the use of Congress; for the printing, binding, and distribution of the Federal Register, and for printing and binding supplements to the Code of Federal Regulations, and also an additional amount to enable the Public Printer to take care of the financial obligation of the office while billings and collections are being made.

The funds to cover the cost of the printing and binding needs of the various executive departments and independent establishments are provided for in the appropriation acts for the several departments and establishments, the Gov rnment Printing Office charging for the services performed at actual cost.

The appropriation for working capital and congressional printing and binding for the fiscal year 1953 totaled $19,000,000. Of the total appropriation, $10,000,000 must be returned to the Treasury not later than 6 months after the close of the fiscal year 1953.

For the fiscal year 1954 an estimate has been subm ted for $25,100,000, including $15 million to be returned to the Treasury as an unexpended balance within 6 months after the close of the fiscal year 1954, leaving $10,100,000 as the net amount estimated for the fiscal year 1954 for printing and binding for the use of Congress, for the Federal Register, and for supplements to the Code of Federal Regulations.

We have prepared the following itemized statement showing the expenditures for the fiscal year 1952 and the estimated expenditures for the fiscal years 1953 and 1954:

Statement of expenditures from working capital and congressional printing and binding for fiscal year 1952 and estimated expenditures for fiscal years 1953 and 1954

that

o do

than

[blocks in formation]
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

that as the

up

Appropriation for congressional printing and binding reduced to $9 million.
: Additional working capital reduced by Appropriations Committee to $10 million.
'Total appropriation reduced by Appropriations Committee to $19 million.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

The requirements under each item for the fiscal year 1954 are set forth briefly in the order named:

(a) Congressional Record.- The proceedings of the Senate and House of Representatives are printed daily in the Congressional Record. Approximately 39,000 toples are printed daily and distributed as provided by law, and are charged to the appropriation for printing for Congress. There also are printed daily about 4,000 additional copies which are delivered and charged to Government departments on requisitions and to the Superintendent of Documents for sale to subseribers. After the close of each session, the daily proceedings are consolidated, indexed, and about 2,900 copies printed as the bound edition of the Record The total cost to Congress of printing the Congressional Record in the fiscal Fear 1952 was $1,974,146.73. The cost of the daily edition and index complete was $1,490,682.98 and the cost of the bound edition completed in the fiscal year 1952 was $483,463.75. The charge for the bound edition includes the completing charges for the 81st Congress, 2d session, edition, $71,243.75, and the charge for the work completed in the fiscal year 1952 on the 82d Congress, 1st session, edition, $412,220. The remainder of the 82d Congress, 1st session, edition, will be charged in the fiscal year 1953. The number of pages in the daily edition in the fiscal year 1952 was 23,701. The estinate submitted for the fiscal year 1953 was $2,200,000 for approximately 26,200 pages. It is estimated there will be 24,700 pages in the fiscal year 1954 and the cost will be $2,100,000. (6) Miscellaneous publications. This item includes such printed matter as the Congressional Directory, Senate and House Journals, memorial addresses, nominations, United States Code and Supplements, and publications not carrying a document number, such as laws, treaties, and similar publications. The expenditures for miscellaneous publications in the fiscal year 1952 were $1,416,274.26 for 3,336,018 copies, making 104,305 pages. The amount estimated for the fiscal year 1953 was $1,350,000 for approximately 120,000 pages. It is estimated that $1,500,000 will be required in the fiscal year 1954 for approximately 107,000 pages. (c) Miscellaneous printing and binding.--This item includes letterheads, envelopes

, blank paper, copy paper, notices, tags, labels, payrolls, blank books, stenographic notebooks, tablets, wall calendars, miscellaneous blank forms, and binding for both Houses.

The expenditures for miscellaneous printing and binding amounted to $881,347.43 in fiscal year 1952 for 89,756,522 separate pieces. "The estimate for the fiscal year 1953 was $800,000 for approximately 89 million separate pieces. The estimate for the fiscal year 1954 is $925,000 for about 92,500,000 separate pieces.

Publications for international exchange.--As provided by law, the Library of Congress is supplied with not to exceed 125 copies of Government publications,

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

including the daily and bound editions of the Congressional Record and not to exceed 150 copies of certain congressional publications for distribution through the Smithsonian Institution, to such governments as may agree to send similar publications of their governments to the United States.

The charges for these publications in the fiscal year 1952 amounted to $71,031.36 for 635,074 copies. The estimate for the fiscal year 1953 was $65,000 for 600,000 copies. It is estimated that $75,000 will be needed for about 625,000 copies io the fiscal year 1954.

(e) Franked envelopes and document franks.-Franked envelopes for mailing speeches and documents are furnished to Senators and Representatives, who are also furnished with franks for mailing documents, printed singly or in sheets with perforations at the option of the Member.

The expenditures for franked envelopes and document franks in the fiscal year 1952 amounted to $193,162.96 for 36,028,400 envelopes and 2,173,350 franks. It was estimated that $200,000 would be required in the fiscal year 1953 to print approximately 38 million envelopes and 2,500,000 franks. It is estimated that $210,000 will be needed in the fiscal year 1954 for approximately 36,500,000 envelopes and 2,500,000 franks.

(f) House and Senate commiltee calendars.-- This heading covers the printing of all House and Senate committee calendars which list the business of the various committees on pending legislation.

The expenditures for House and Senate committee calendars for the fiscal year 1952 were $465,663,09 for 68,190 pages. The estimate for the cost of these calendars in the fiscal year 1953 was $550,000 for approximately 70,000 pages. It is estimated that $500,000 will be required in the fiscal year 1954 for approximately 69,000 pages.

(g) Bills, resolutions, and amendments.—This heading covers the printing of bills, resolutions, and amendments in all forms, including the prints as introduced, referred, reported, and as finally passed.

The expenditures for bills, resolutions, and amendments in the fiscal year 1952 amounted to $753,638.07 for 87,057 pages. The estimate submitted for the fiscal year 1953 was $800,000 for about 110,000 pages. The estimate for the fiscal year 1954 is $800,000 for approximately 89,000 pages.

(h) Committee reports. - This item covers printed reports of congressional committees on pending legislation.

The cost of printing these reports in the fiscal year 1952 was $396,090.82 for 25,568 pages. It was estimated $400,000 would be needed for approximately 23,500 pages in the fiscal year 1953. It is estimated that $415,000 will be needed for about 25,500 pages in the fiscal year 1954.

(2) Documents.—This heading includes all classes of Senate and House documents ordered printed by Congress which carry a congressional number, such as annual reports, engineers' reports, special reports made by Government depart, ments in response to resolutions, supplemental, and deficiency estimates of appropriations, etc.

The expenditures for House and Senate documents in the fiscal year 1952 amounted to $294,880.06 for 14,168 pages. The estimate for the fiscal year 1953 was $350,000 for about 17,500 pages. The estimate for the fiscal year 1954 is $325,000 for about 15,000 pages.

(j) Hearings.- This item covers all hearings before congressional committees.

The expenditures for hearings in the fiscal year 1952 were $1,912,177.08 for 144,130 pages. The estimate for the fiscal year 1953 was $2,035,000 for ap. proximately 156,600 pages. The estimate for the fiscal year 1954 is $2,100,000 for about 150,000 pages.

(k) Federal Register and United States Government Organization Manual — The Archivist of the United States and the Public Printer are charged with the printing and distribution, in a serial publication titled "Federal Register” of documents authorized to be published under the act of July 26, 1935, and the act of June 11, 1916. Funds to cover the cost of printing this publication are provided for in the appropriation for congressional printing and binding and working capital for the Government Printing Office. The National Archives has been authorized (13 F. R. 5935; 1 CFR pt. 3) to handle the United States Government Organization Manual as a special edition of the Federal Register. Beginning with the fiscal year 1950, the cost of this manual will be charged to the cost for printing the Federal Register (sec. 6, 49 Stat. 501:44 U.S. C. 306).

The expenditures for the Federal Register and the United States Government Organization Manual for the fiscal year 1952 amounted to $641,588.14 for 14,436 pages, including 724 pages of the United States Government Organization Manual.

« PreviousContinue »