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total number of units included in these two categories.

(b) The following modifications of definitions set forth in Part 400 of this chapter are applicable to this Standard: None. $ 411.40 Fundamental requirement.

(a) The contractor shall have, and consistently apply, written statements of accounting policies and practices for accumulating the costs of material and for allocating costs of material to cost objectives.

(b) The cost of units of a category of material may be allocated directly to a cost objective provided the cost objective was specifically identified at the time of purchase or production of the units.

(c) The cost of material which (1) is used solely in performing indirect functions, or (2) is not a significant element of production cost, whether or not incorporated in an end product, may be allocated to an indirect cost pool. When significant, the cost of such indirect material not consumed in a cost accounting period shall be established as an asset at the end of the period.

(d) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, the cost of a category of material shall be accounted for in materi. al inventory records.

(e) In allocating to cost objectives the costs of a category of material issued from company-owned material inventory, the costing method used shall be selected in accordance with the provisions of $ 411.50, and shall be used in a manner which results in systematic and rational costing of issues of material to cost objectives. The same cost. ing method shall, within the same business unit, be used for similar categories of mate. rials. § 411.50 Techniques for application.

(a) Material cost shall be the acquisition cost of a category of material whether or

a material inventory record is used. The purchase price of material shall be adjusted by extra charges incurred or discounts and credits earned. Such adjustments shall be charged or credited to the same cost objective as the purchase price of the material, except that where it is not practical to do so, the contractor's policy may provide for the consistent inclusion of such charges or credits in an appropriate indirect cost pool.

(b) One of the following inventory costing methods shall be used when issuing material from a company-owned inventory:

(1) The first-in, first-out (FIFO) method, (2) The moving average cost method. (3) The weighted average cost method. (4) The standard cost method. or (5) The last-in, first-out (LIFO) method.

(c) The method of computation used for any inventory costing method selected pursuant to the provisions of this Standard shall be consistently followed.

(d) Where the excess of the ending inventory over the beginning inventory of materi. al of the type described in § 411.40(c) is estimated to be significant in relation to the total cost included in the indirect cost pool, the cost of such unconsumed material shall be established as an asset at the end of the period by reducing the indirect cost pool by a corresponding amount. $ 411.60 Ilustrations

(a) Contractor "A" has one contract which requires two custom-ordered, high-value, airborne cameras. The contractor's established policy is to order such special items specifically identified to a contract as the need arises and to charge them directly to the contract. Another contract is received which requires three more of these cameras, which the contractor purchases at a unit cost which differs from the unit cost of the first two cameras ordered. When the purchase orders were placed, the contractor identified the specific contracts on which the cameras being purchased were to be used. Although these cameras are identical, the actual cost of each camera is charged to the contract for which it was acquired without establishing a material inventory record. This practice would not be a violation of this Standard.

(b) (1) A Government contract requires use of electronic tubes identified as "W." The contractor expects to receive other contracts requiring the use of tubes of the same type. In accordance with its written policy, the contractor establishes a material inventory record for electronic tube "W," and allocates the cost of units issued to the existing Government contract by the FIFO method. Such a practice would conform to the requirements of this Standard.

(2) The contractor is awarded several additional contracts which require an electronic tube which the contractor concludes is similar to the one described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section and which is identifie “Y." At the time a purchase order for these tubes is written, the contractor cannot identify the specific number of tubes to be used on each contract. Consequently, the contractor establishes an inventory record for these tubes and allocates their cost to the contracts on an average cost method. Because a FIFO method is used for a similar category of material within the same business unit, the use of an average cost method for "Y" would be a violation of this Standard.

(c) A contractor complies with the Cost Accounting Standard on standard costs (Part 407 of this chapter), and he uses a standard cost method for allocating the costs of essentially all categories of material. Also, it is the contractor's established practice to charge the cost of purchased parts which are incorporated in his end products, and which are not a significant element of production cost to an indirect cost pool. Such practices conform to this Standard.

(d) A contractor has one established inventory for type "R" transformers. The contractor allocates by the LIFO method the current costs of the individual units issued to Government contracts. Such a practice would conform to the requirements of this Standard.

(e) A contractor has established inventories for various categories of material which are used on Government contracts. During the year the contractor allocates the costs of the units of the various categories of material issued to contracts by the moving average cost method. The contractor uses the LIFO method for tax and finan. cial reporting purposes and, at year end, applies a pooled LIFO inventory adjustment for all categories of material to Government contracts. This application of pooled costs to Government contracts would be a violation of this Standard because the lump sum adjustment to all of the various categories of material is, in effect, a noncurrent repricing of the material issues. $ 411.70 Exemptions.

None for this Standard. § 411.80 Effective date.

(a) The effective date of this Standard is January 1, 1976 (40 FR 32823, August 5, 1975).

(b) This Standard shall be applied to materials purchased or produced after the start of the contractor's next fiscal year beginning after receipt of a contract to which this Standard is applicable. (41 FR 47243, Oct. 28, 1976)

$ 412.10 General applicability.

General applicability of this Cost ACcounting Standard is established by $ 331.30 of the Board's regulations on applicability, exemption, and waiver of the requirement to include the Cost Accounting Standards contract clause in negotiated defense prime contracts and subcontracts (8 331.30 of this chapter). § 412.20 Purpose.

The purpose of this Standard is to provide guidance for determining and measuring the components of pension cost. The Standard establishes the basis on which pension costs shall be assigned to cost accounting periods. The provisions of this Cost Accounting Standard should enhance uniformity and consistency in accounting for pension costs and thereby increase the probability that those costs are properly allocated to cost objectives. $ 412.30 Definitions.

(a) The following definitions of terms which are prominent in this Standard are reprinted from Part 400 of this chapter for convenience. Other terms which are used in this Standard and are defined in Part 400 of this chapter have the meaning ascribed to them in that part unless the text demands a different definition or the definition is modified in paragraph (b) of this section:

(1) Accrued benefit cost method. An actuarial cost method under which units of benefit are assigned to each cost accounting period and are valued as they accrue-that is, based on the services performed by each employee in the period involved. The measure of normal cost under this method for each cost accounting period is the present value of the units of benefits deemed to be credited to employees for service in that period. The measure of the actuarial liability at a plan's inception date is the present value of the units of benefit credited to employees for service prior to that date. (This method is also known as the Unit Credit cost method.)

(2) Actuarial assumption. A prediction of future conditions affecting pension cost; for example, mortality rate, employee turnover, compensation levels, pension fund earnings, changes in values of pension fund assets.

(3) Actuarial cost method. A technique which uses actuarial assumptions to measure the present value of future pension benefits and pension fund administrative expenses, and which assigns the cost of such benefits and expenses to cost accounting periods.

(4) Actuarial gain and loss. The effect on pension cost resulting from differences between actuarial assumptions and actual experience.

(5) Actuarial liability. Pension cost attributable, under the actuarial cost method in

$ 1-3.1220-12 Composition and measure

ment of pension cost. PART 412-Cost ACCOUNTING STANDARDS FOR COMPOSITION AND MEASUREMENT OF PEN

SION COST Sec. 412.10 General applicability. 412.20 Purpose. 412.30 Definitions. 412.40 Fundamental requirement. 412.50 Techniques for application. 412.60 Illustrations. 412.70 Exemptions. 412.80 Effective date.

AUTHORITY: 84 Stat. 796, sec. 103 (50 U.S.C. App. 2168)

SOURCE: 40 FR 43873, September 24, 1975, Correction at 40 FR 45417, October 2, 1975, unless otherwise noted.

use, to years prior to the date of a particular actuarial valuation. As of such date, the actuarial liability represents the excess of the present value of the future benefits and administrative expenses over the present value of future contributions for the normal cost for all plan participants and beneficiaries. The excess of the actuarial liability over the value of the assets of a pension plan is the Unfunded Actuarial Liability.

(6) Defined-benefit pension plan. A pension plan in which the benefits to be paid or the basis for determining such benefits are established in advance and the contributions are intended to provide the stated benefits.

(7) Defined-contribution pension plan. A pension plan in which the contributions to be made are established in advance and the benefits are determined thereby.

(8) Funded pension cost. The portion of pension costs for a current or prior cost accounting period that has been paid to a funding agency or, under a pay-as-you-go plan, to plan participants or beneficiaries.

(9) Funding agency. An organization or individual which provides facilities to receive and accumulate assets to be used either for the payment of benefits under a pension plan, or for the purchase of such benefits.

(10) Multiemployer pension plan. A plan to which more than one employer contributes and which is maintained pursuant to one or more collective bargaining agreements between an employee organization and more than one employer.

(11) Normal cost. The annual cost attributable, under the actuarial cost method in use, to years subsequent to a particular valuation date.

(12) Pay-as-you-go cost method. A method of recognizing pension cost only when bene. fits are paid to retired employees or their beneficiaries.

(13) Pension plan. A deferred compensation plan established and maintained by one or more employers to provide systematically for the payment of benefits to plan participants after their retirement, provided that the benefits are paid for life or are payable for life at the option of the employees. Ad. ditional benefits such as permanent and total disability and death payments, and survivorship payments to beneficiaries of deceased employees may be an integral part of a pension plan.

(14) Projected benefit cost method. Any of the several actuarial cost methods which distribute the estimated total cost of all of the employees' prospective benefits over a period of years, usually their working careers.

(b) The following modifications of definitions set forth in Part 400 of this chapter are applicable to this Standard: None.

$ 412.40 Fundamental requirement.

(a) Components of pension cost. (1) For defined-benefit pension plans, the components of pension cost for a cost accounting period are (i) the normal cost of the period, (ii) a part of any unfunded actuarial liability, (iii) an interest equivalent on the unamortized portion of any unfunded actuarial liability, and (iv) an adjustment for any actuarial gains and losses.

(2) For defined-contribution pension plans, the pension cost for a cost accounting period is the net contribution required to be made for that period, after taking into account dividends and other credits, where applicable.

(b) Measurement of pension cost. (1) For defined-benefit pension plans, the amount of pension cost of a cost accounting period shall be determined by use of an actuarial cost method which measures separately each of the components of pension cost set forth in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, or which meets the requirements set forth in $ 412.50(b)(2).

(2) Each actuarial assumption used to measure pension cost shall be separately identified and shall represent the contractor's best estimates of anticipated experience under the plan, taking into account past experience and reasonable expectations. The validity of the assumptions used may be evaluated on an aggregate, rather than on an assumption-by-assumption, basis.

(c) Assignment of pension cost. The amount of pension cost computed for a cost accounting period is assignable only to that period. Except for pay-as-you-go plans, the cost assignable to a period is allocable to cost objectives of that period to the extent that liquidation of the liability for such cost can be compelled or liquidation is actually effected in that period. For pay-as-you-go plans, the entire cost assignable to a period is allocable to cost objectives of that period only if the payment of benefits earned by plan participants can be compelled. If such payment is optional with the company, the amount of assignable costs allocable to cost objectives of that period is limited to the amount of benefits actually paid to retirees or beneficiaries in that period. $ 412.50 Techniques for application.

(a) Components of pension cost. (1) Any portion of an unfunded actuarial liability included as a separately identified part of the pension cost of a cost accounting period shall be included in equal annual installments. Each installment shall consist of an amortized portion of the unfunded actuarial liability plus an interest equivalent on the unamortized portion of such liability. The period of amortization shall be established as follows:

(i) If amortization of an unfunded actuarial liability has begun prior to the date this

Standard first becomes applicable to a con- funded in that period, no amount for intertractor, no change in the amortization est on the portion not funded in that period period is required by the Standard.

shall be a component of pension cost of any (ii) If amortization of an unfunded actuar future cost accounting period. Conversely, if ial liability has not begun prior to the date a contractor prematurely funds pension this Standard first becomes applicable to a costs in a current cost accounting period, contractor, the amortization period shall the interest earned on such premature fund. begin with the period in which the Standard ing, based on the valuation rate of return. becomes applicable and shall be no more may be excluded from future years' computhan 30 years nor less than 10 years. Howey. tations of pension cost made pursuant to er, if the plan was in existence as of Janu this Standard. ary 1, 1974, the amortization period shall be (8) For purposes of this Standard, definedno more than 40 years nor less than 10 benefit pension plans funded exclusively by years.

the purchase of individual or group perma(iii) Each unfunded actuarial liability re nent insurance or annuity contracts shall be sulting from the institution of new pension treated as defined-contribution pension plans or from adoption of improvements to plans. However, all other defined-benefit pension plans subsequent to the date this pension plans administered wholly or in Standard first becomes applicable to a con part through insurance company contracts tractor shall be amortized over no more shall be subject to the provisions of this than 30 years nor less than 10 years.

Standard relative to defined-benefit pension (2) Pension costs applicable to prior years plans. that were specifically unallowable in accord (9) If a pension plan is supplemented by a ance with then existing Government con separately-funded plan which provides retractual provisions shall be separately iden- tirement benefits to all of the participants tified and eliminated from any unfunded ac- in the basic plan, the two plans shall be contuarial liability being amortized pursuant to sidered as a single plan for purposes of this the provision of paragraph (a)(1) of this sec- Standard. If the effect of the combined tion, or from future normal costs if the ac- plans is to provide defined-benefits for the tuarial cost method in use does not sepa- plan participants, the combined plan shall rately develop an unfunded actuarial liabili- be treated as a defined-benefit plan for purty. Interest earned on funded unallowable poses of this Standard. pension costs, based on the valuation rate of (10) A multiemployer pension plan estabreturn, need not be included by contractors lished pursuant to the terms of a collective as a reduction of future years' computations bargaining agreement shall be considered to of pension costs made pursuant to this be a defined-contribution pension plan for Standard.

purposes of this Standard. (3) A contractor shall establish and con (11) A pension plan applicable to colleges sistently follow a policy for selecting specif- and universities that is part of a State penic amortization periods for unfunded actuar sion plan shall be considered to be a deial liabilities, if any, that are developed fined-contribution pension plan for purunder the actuarial cost method in use. poses of this Standard. Such policy may give consideration to fac (b) Measurement of pension cost. (1) The tors such as the size and nature of unfunded amount of pension cost assignable to cost actuarial liabilities.

accounting periods shall be measured by the (4) Actuarial assumptions used in calculat accrued benefit cost method or by a projecting the amount of an unfunded actuarial li ed benefit cost method which identifies sepability shall be the same as those used for arately normal costs, any unfunded actuarother components of pension cost. If any as ial liability, and periodic determinations of sumptions are changed during an amortiza actuarial gains and losses, except as protion period, the resulting increase or de vided in paragraph (b)(2) of this section. crease in an unfunded actuarial liability (2) Any other projected benefit cost shall be separately amortized over no more method may be used, provided that: than 30 years nor less than 10 years.

(i) The method is used by the contractor (5) Actuarial gains and losses shall be in measuring pension costs for financial acidentified separately from unfunded actuar counting purposes; ial liabilities that are being amortized pur (ii) The amount of pension cost assigned suant to the provisions of this Standard. to a cost accounting period computed under The accounting treatment to be afforded to such method is reduced by the excess, if such gains and losses shall be consistently any, of the value of the assets of the penapplied for each pension plan.

sion fund over the actuarial liability of the (6) An excise tax assessed pursuant to a plan as determined by a projected benefit law or regulation because of inadequate or cost method set forth in paragraph (b)(1) of delayed funding of a pension plan is not a this section: component of pension cost.

(iii) The contractor accumulates supple(7) If any portion of the pension cost com- mentary information identifying the actuarputed for a cost accounting period is not ial gains and losses (and, separately, gains

or losses resulting from changed actuarial assumptions) that have occurred since the last determination of gains and losses and the extent to which such gains and losses have been amortized through subsequent pension contributions or offset by gains and losses in subsequent cost accounting periods, and

(iv) The cost of future pension benefits is spread over the remaining average working lives of the work force.

(3) Irrespective of the projected benefit cost method used, the calculation of normal cost shall be based on a percentage of pay. roll for plans where the pension benefit is a function of salaries and wages and on employee service for plans where the pension benefit is not a function of salaries and wages.

(4) The cost of benefits under a pay-asyou-go pension plan shall be measured in the same manner as are the costs of defined-benefit plans whose benefits are provided through a funding agency.

(5) Actuarial assumptions should reflect long-term trends so as to avoid distortions caused by short-term fluctuations.

(6) Pension cost shall be based on provisions of existing pension plans. This shall not preclude contractors from making salary projections for plans whose benefits are based on salaries and wages, or from considering improved benefits for plans which provide that such improved benefits must be made.

(7) If the evaluation of the validity of actuarial assumptions shows that, in the ag. gregate, the assumptions were not reasonable, the contractor shall (i) identify the major causes for the resultant actuarial gains or losses and (ii) provide information as to the basis and rationale used for retaining or revising such assumptions for use in the ensuing cost accounting period(s).

(c) Assignment of pension cost. (1) Amounts funded in excess of the pension cost computed for a cost accounting period pursuant to the provisions of this Standard shall be applied to pension costs of future cost accounting periods.

(2) Evidence that the liquidation of a liability for pension cost can be compelled includes (i) provisions of law such as the funding provisions of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, except as provided in paragraph (c)(3) of this section, (ii) a contractual agreement which requires liquidation of the liability, or (iii) the existence of rights by a third party to require liquidation of the liability.

(3) Any portion of pension cost computed for a cost accounting period that is deferred to future periods pursuant to a waiver granted under provisions of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, shall not be assigned to the current period. Rather, such costs shall be assigned to the

cost accounting period(s) in which the funding takes place.

(4) A liability for pension cost for a cost accounting period (or, for pay-as-you-go plans, for payments to retirees or beneficiaries for a period) shall be considered to be liquidated in the period if funding is effected by the date established for filing a Federal income tax return (including authorized extensions). For contractors not required to file Federal income tax returns, the date shall be that established for filing Federal corporation income tax returns. $ 412.60 Ilustrations.

(a) Components of pension cost. (1) Contractor A has a defined-benefit pension plan for its employees. The contractor's policy has been to compute and fund as annual pension cost normal cost plus only interest on the unfunded actuarial liability. Pursuant to $ 412.40(a)(1), the components of pension cost for a cost accounting period must now include not only the normal cost for the period and interest on the unfunded actuarial liability, but also an amortized portion of the unfunded actuarial liability. The amortization of the liability and the interest equivalent on the unamortized portion of the liability must be computed in equal annual installments.

(2) Contractor B has insured pension plans for each of two small groups of em. ployees. One plan is funded through a group permanent insurance contract; the other plan is funded through a group deferred annuity contract. Both plans provide for defined benefits. Pursuant to $ 413.50(a)(8), for purposes of this Standard the plan financed through a group permanent insurance contract shall be considered to be a defined-contribution pension plan; the net premium required to be paid for a cost accounting period (after deducting dividends and any credits) shall be the pension cost for that period. However, the group deferred annuity plan is subject to the provisions of this Standard that are applicable to defined-benefit plans.

(3) Contractor C provides pension benefits for certain hourly employees through a multiemployer defined-benefit plan. Under the collective bargaining agreement, the contractor pays six cents into the fund for each hour worked by the covered employees. Pursuant to $ 412.50(a)(10), the plan shall be considered to be a defined-contribution pension plan. The payments required to be made for a cost accounting period shall constitute the assignable pension cost for that period.

(4) Contractor D provides pension benefits for certain employees through a definedcontribution pension plan. However, the contractor has a separate fund which is used to supplement pension benefits provided for all of the participants in the basic

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