De Quincey's writings [ed. by J.T. Fields. 23 vols., comprising the final set of 22 and the original vol. 5, Life and manners, subsequently replaced by vol. 12, Autobiographic sketches].

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Ticknor, Reed, and Fields, 1854
 

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Page 233 - But ask not to what doctors I apply ; Sworn to no master, of no sect am I : As drives the storm, at any door I knock, And house with Montaigne now, or now with Locke...
Page 244 - In the worst inn's worst room, with mat half hung The floors of plaster, and the walls of dung, On once a flock-bed, but repair'd with straw, With tape-tied curtains, never meant to draw, The George and Garter dangling from that bed Where tawdry yellow strove with dirty red, Great Villiers lies...
Page 262 - So am I as the rich, whose blessed key Can bring him to his sweet up-locked treasure, The which he will not every hour survey, For blunting the fine point of seldom pleasure. Therefore are feasts so solemn and so rare, Since, seldom coming, in the long year set, Like stones of worth they thinly placed are, Or captain jewels in the carcanet.
Page 244 - On once a flock-hed, but repaired with straw, With tape-tied curtains never meant to draw, The George and Garter dangling from that bed Where tawdry yellow strove with dirty red, Great Villiers lies ! Alas ! how changed from him, That life of pleasure, and that soul of whim, Gallant and gay in Cliveden's proud alcove, ; The bower of wanton Shrewsbury and love ; There, victor of his health, of fortune, friends, ' And fame, the lord of useless thousands ends.
Page 98 - But, with regard to Milton and the Miltonic power, the case is far otherwise. If the man had failed, the power would have failed. In that mode of power which he wielded, the function was exhausted in the man — the species was identified with the individual — the poetry was incarnated in the poet.
Page 249 - We conquered France, but felt our captive's charms — Her arts victorious triumphed o'er our arms ; Britain to soft refinements less a foe, Wit grew polite, and numbers learned to flow.
Page 244 - Gallant and gay, in Cliefden's proud alcove, The bower of wanton Shrewsbury '(' and love ; Or just as gay, at council, in a ring Of mimic statesmen, and their merry king. No wit to flatter, left of all his store ! No fool to laugh at, which he valued more. There, victor of his health, of fortune, friends, And fame ; this...
Page 174 - ... until some person whom the animals knew came to protect him. As this expedient was new to the traveller, he made some further inquiries, and was assured that if any person in such a predicament will simply seat himself on the ground, laying aside his weapon of defence, the dogs will also squat in a circle round him ; that as long as he remains quiet they will follow his example ; but that as soon as he rises and moves forward they will renew their assault.
Page 232 - Nullius addictus jurare in verba magistri, Quo me cunque rapit tempestas, deferor hospes.

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