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THOMAS JEFFERSON

President Jefferson vetoed no bills during his administration (Seventh Congress, first session to Tenth Congress, second session).

JAMES MADISON

President Madison vetoed seven bills, of which five
were regular vetoes and two were pocket vetoes.
None of the regular vetoes was overridden.
There were no vetoes in the first and second ses-
sions of the Eleventh Congress, nor in the first and
second sessions of the Thirteenth Congress.

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Eleventh Congress, Third Session
Regular Vetoes
H.R. 155.
Incorporating the Protestant Episcopal Church
in the town of Alexandria, in the District of
Columbia.
Vetoed February 21, 1811. The veto message was
laid before the House. (February 21, 1811, H. Jour.,
pp. 566, 567; see also S. Misc. Doc. No. 53, 49th
Cong., 2d sess., p. 11).
The House sustained the veto on February 23, 1811
by a vote of 29 yeas to 74 nays. (February 23, 1811,
H. Jour., p. 570-573).
Veto sustained.

4. H.R. 170.

For the relief of Richard Tervin, William Coleman,
Edwin Lewis, Samuel Mims, Joseph Wilson, and the
Baptist Church at Salem meeting house, in the
Mississippi Territory.
Vetoed February 28, 1811. The veto message was
laid before the House. (February 28, 1811, H. Jour.,
p. 602; see also S. Misc. Doc. No. 53, 49th Cong.,
2d sess., p. 12).
The House sustained the veto on March 2, 1811 by a
vote of 33 yeas to 55 nays. (March 2, 1811, H. Jour.,
pp. 608, 609).
Veto sustained.

Twelfth Congress, First Session

Regular Veto 5 H.R. 81.

For the trial of Causes pending in the respective
District Courts of the United States, in case of the
absence of disability of the Judges thereof.
Vetoed April 3, 1812. The veto message was laid
before the House. (April 3, 1812, H. Jour., pp. 274,
275; see also S. Misc. Doc. No. 53, 49th Cong.,
2d sess., pp. 12, 13).
The House sustained the veto on April 8, 1812 by a
vote of 26 yeas to 70 nays. (April 8, 1812, H. Jour.,
pp. 281, 282).
Veto sustained.

Twelfth Congress, Second Session

Pocket Veto 6 H.R. 170.

On the subject of a uniform rule of naturalization. Pocket veto occurred after the 1st session of the 12th Congress had adjourned sine die on July 6, 1812. A presidential message was received by the 2d session of the 12th Congress on November 6, 1812. (November 6, 1812, H. Jour., p. 544; see also H.R. Doc. No. 493, 70th Cong., 2d sess., p. 2; S. Misc. Doc. No. 53, 49th Cong., 2d sess., p. 13).

Thirteenth Congress, Third Session

Regular Veto 7 S. 67.

To incorporate the subscribers to the Bank of the
United States of America.
Vetoed January 30, 1815. The veto message was
laid before the Senate. (January 30, 1815, S. Jour.,
pp. 620, 621; see also S. Misc. Doc. No. 53, 49th
Cong., 2d sess., pp. 14-16).
The Senate sustained the veto on February 2, 1815
by a vote of 15 yeas to 19 nays. (February 2, 1815,
S. Jour., pp. 630, 631).
Veto sustained.

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Fourteenth Congress, First Session
Pocket Veto
H.R. 106.
To provide for free importation of stereotype plates
and to encourage the printing and gratuitous distri-
bution of the Scriptures by the Bible societies within
the United States.
Pocket veto occurred after the 1st session of the 14th
Congress had adjourned sine die on April 30, 1816.
The bill was presented to the President on April 27,

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1816. (April 27, 1816, H. Jour., p. 737; see also H.R. Doc. No. 493, 70th Cong., 2d sess., pp. 2, 3).

Fourteenth Congress, Second Session

Regular Veto 9 H.R. 29.

To set apart and pledge certain funds for internal
improvements.
Vetoed March 3, 1817. The veto message was laid
before the House. (March 3, 1817, H. Jour., pp. 534-
537; see also S. Misc. Doc. No. 53, 49th Cong., 2d
sess., pp. 16-18).
The House sustained the veto on March 3, 1817 by
a vote of 60 yeas to 56 nays. (March 3, 1817, H.
Jour., pp. 539, 540).
Veto sustained.

JAMES MONROE

President Monroe vetoed one bill. This regular veto
was not overridden.
There were no vetoes in the first and second sessions
of the Fifteenth Congress, in the first and second
sessions of the Sixteenth Congress, in the second ses-
sion of the Seventeenth Congress, nor in the first
and second sessions of the Eighteenth Congress.

Seventeenth Congress, First Session

Regular Veto 10 H.R. 50.

For the preservation and repair of the Cumberland
Road.
Vetoed May 4, 1822. The veto message was laid
before the House. (May 4, 1822, H. Jour., pp. 560,
561; see also S. Misc. Doc. No. 53, 49th Cong., 2d
sess., pp. 18-20).
The House sustained the veto on May 6, 1822 by a
vote of 68 yeas to 72 nays. (May 6, 1822, H. Jour.,
pp. 580, 581).
Veto sustained

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