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Extracted from:

Congressional Record, Daily Digest, House,
Vol. 112, D771, August 17, 1966

Traffic Safety: By a record vote of 371 yeas the House passed H.R. 13228, to provide for a coordinated national safety program and establishment of safety standards for motor vehicles in interstate commerce to reduce traffic accidents and the deaths, injuries, and property damage which occur in such accidents, as amended.

By a record vote of 168 yeas to 205 nays the House rejected an amendment designed to have the President appoint a National Motor Vehicle Safety Advisory Council, instead of the Secretary of Commerce. Prior to this action the amendment had been agreed to by a division vote of 80 yeas to 77 nays.

Adopted amendments: Which delete the definition of "person” in title I. That clarify section 2 of title IV. Specifying a time limit for the Secretary to publish a uniform quality grading system for motor vehicle tires.

Regarding entry for inspection of records.

Regarding the issuing of a certificate that the vehicle conforms to safety standards if the issuing person knows the certificate is false.

Relating to the keeping of records by the manufacturer and the inspection of them by persons designated by the Secretary.

Rejected amendments:

To provide for criminal penalties for negligence in automobile manufacture.

To provide seat belts for school buses.
Rejected a recommittal motion.

The passage was subsequently vacated and S. 3005 was passed in lieu, after being amended to contain the House-passed language.

H. Res. 965, the rule under which the legislation was considered, was adopted earlier by a voice vote.

Pages 19625 — 19674

Congressional Record-House
August 17, 1966, 19625— 19674

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NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND MOTOR sideration of 8. 3005, strike out all after

VEHICLE BAPETY ACT OP 1966 the enacting clause and insert the lan. Mr. MADDEN. Mr. Speaker. by di. Fuage of the House bull. rection of the Committee on Rules, I call

It has been reliably estimated that up House Resolution 965 and ask for its

over 50,000 persons will die on our highimmediate consideration.

ways in 1966 and unless a broad-scale The Clerk read the resolution, as fol

attack is promptly directed at this prob

lem. It appears just as certain that some lows: ... Rp. 986

100,000 Americans will die as the result

of tramc accidents in 1975. Resolved, That upon the adoption of this resolution it shall be in order to move that

During the hearings before the legislathe House resolve Itsell into the Committee tive committee it wag pointed out that of the Whole House on the State of the

since 1961 we have lost about four times Union for the consideration of the bill (H.R.

N many members of the armed services 13228) to provide for a coordinated national

in tramc accidents as we have in combat safety program and establishment of safety standards for motor vehicles in interstate

in Vietnam. commerce to reduce traffic accidents and the In addition to the deaths, there are deaths, injuries, and property damage which millions who have sunered severe and occur in such accidents. After general de permanent injuries. The cost in dollars bate, which shall be confined to the bill and

of last year's trainc accidents has been shall continue not to exceed three hours, to

estimated at $8 billion and the cost in be equally divided and controlled by the chairman and ranking minority member of

terms of grief and suffering is immeag. the Committee on Interstate and Foreign

urable. Commerce, the bill shall be rend for amend Passengers riding in vehicles moving ment under the Ave-minute rule. It shall at speeds of 60 and 70 miles per hour be in order to consider the substituto amend

or even higher speed need to be proment recommended by the Committee on In

tected in the event that an accident does teritate and foreign Commerce now in the

occur. Such protection can be afforded bill and such substitute for the purpose of amondment shall bo considered under the

at least to a degree substantially greater Ave-minuto rule as an original bill. At the than that which exists at present. If conclusion of such consideration the Com all reasonable steps are taken to minimittee shall rise and report the bill to the mize the impact which results after an House with such amendments as may have

accident occurs between two vehicles or been adopted, and any Member may demand

a vehicle and a stationary object damA separate vote in the House on any of the amendments adopted in the Committee of

ages, injury and death can be avoided. tho Wholo to the bill or committee substitute.

Under H.R. 13228 work can be augThe previous question shall be considered mented and channeled so that it will be as ordered on the bill and amendments more widely disseminated to all interthereto to anal passage without intervening ested persons thus leading to improved motion except one motion to recommit with motor vehicle safety performance with a or without instructions. After the passage

consequent reduction in deaths and inof H.R. 13228, the Committee on Interstate

juries. and Foreign Commerce shall be discharged

This is a nationwide problem from

which requires forthright guidance and the further consideration of the bill (S. 3006), and it shall then be in order in legislation at the national level. tho House to move to strike out all after the Mr. Speaker, I urge the adoption of enacting clause of said Senate bill and in House Resolution 965 in order that H.R. sert in lleu thereof the provisions contained

13228 may be considered. in H.R. 13228 4 passed the House.

Mr. QUILLEN. Mr. Speaker, I yield The SPEAKER. The gentleman from myself as much time as I may consume. Indiana is recognized for 1 hour.

Mr. Speaker, the gentleman from IndiMr. MADDEN. Mr. Speaker, I yield and has fully stated the provisions of 30 minutes to the gentleman from Ten House Resolution 965. It provides for an nessee (Mr. QUILLEN), pending which I open rule with 3 hours of general debate vield myselt such time as I may consume. on H.R. 13228. the National Tramc and

Mr. Speaker. House Resolution 965 Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1966. The provides for consideration of H.R. 13228, substitute recommended by the Commita bill to provide for a coordinated na tee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce tional safety program and establishment now in the bill shall be considered as an of safety standards for motor vehicles original bill for purposes of amendment in interstate commerce. Its enactment under the 5-minute rule. After passage will reduce tramc accidents, deaths, In- of H.R. 13228, the Committee on Interjuries, and property damage which oc- state and Foreign Commerce will be discur in such accidents. The resolution charged from further consideration of provides an open rule with 3 hours of S. 3005, the similar Senate-passed bill, general debate, making it in order to and it shall be in order to move to strike consider the substitute as an original out all after the enacting clause of the bull for the purpose of amendment. The Senate bill and insert the provisions conresolution also makes it in order to dis- tained in H.R. 13228 as passed by the charge the Committee on Interstate and House. Foreign Commerce from further con

The purpose of H.R. 13228 is to reduce trafic accidents and the accompanying deaths and injuries. In order to achieve this end, the legislation: First, provides for the establishment of Federal safety standards for motor vehicles and vehicle equipment; second, safety research and development programs are instituted; and third, an expansion of the national driver register is authorized

The Secretary is required to establish standards for motor vehicles and their equipment. They are to be practicable, taldng into account economic factors and technological ablity to achieve the de

red result. Standards may be amended or revoked as necessary by the Secretary.

In determining standards the Secretary is required to: First, consider relevant safety data; second, consult with the Vehicle Equipment Safety Commission and such State or Interstate agencles. Me he deems necessary; : third, consder whether , proposed standard is reasonable, practicable, and appropriate; and, fourth, consider the extent to which the proposed standard will further the purposes of the act. To secure information upon which to base his orders the Secretary is empowered to conduct research, testing, and to make grants to States and nonprofit institutions qualified to conduct such work.

The bill requires the Secretary to issue initial Federal safety standards by January 31, 1967. New and revised if necessary-standards are required by January 31, 1968.

Any safety regulation issued by the Secretary is subject to judicial review under the bill. An adversely affected person may request a court of appeals, within 60 days of its issuance, to review the order of the Secretary, who must file with the court a record of the proceedings on which he based his orders. The court may require additional evidence in material. The findings and order of the Secretary will be sustained when supported by substantial evidence on the basis of the entire record; he may also be required to modify his findings and order.

The bill prohibits the manufacture, importation, or sale of vehicles which fail to meet issued standards. These provisions do not apply to resale of used cars. The bill does provide some control over used car resales. The Secretary is authorized to make a study of safety standards for such vehicles, as well as Inspection requirements in each State, and to report his findings to Congress within 1 year of enactment. Within the next year, safety standards are to be issued covering used cars.

Penalties are provided for violations, up to $1,000 for each violation; each vehicle involved is a separate violation. The maximum civil penalty for a series of violations is $400.000. Injunctive relief is also available to the Secretary to stop a series of violations. The Secretary is required to give notice to anyone against whom an injunction is contemplated and is required to give such person an opportunity for compliance. In cases of

criminal contempt for violations of an injunctive order, trial by jury is available.

Manufacturers are required to keep records, which the Secretary can use to determine whether such manufacturers are complying with standards. Trade secrets are to be protected. Notice must be given by a manufacturer of any defect relating to safety; notice to be given by certified mall to årst retall purchaser and dealer. A copy of such notice must be forwarded to the Secretary; the manufacturer must promptly correct the defect.

The bill establishes a National Tralfic Safety Agency, headed by an Administrator, appointed by the President, performing such duties as are delegated him by the Secretary, the administering of this act. The Secretary must report to the Congress by March I of each year.

Tire safety is dealt with in title I of the bill. A safety label is required for each tire giving pertinent information. Standards are to be established. under the authority granted the Secretary in title I. This title will require that "original equipment tires, or deluxe tires." et cetera, mean the same thing for each manufacturer so that the customer can more readily determine comparative values.

Authorizations for the bill are: Title I-except tire safety-$11 million for fiscal 1967, $17 million for 1968, and $23 million for 1969. Tire safety authorizations are $2.9 million for fiscal 1967 and $1,450,000 for each of 1968 and 1969.

A National Motor Vehicle Safety Advisory Council is established, consisting of five members from the general public, five members from the industry, and three members of State and local government to advise and consult with the Secretary of Commerce on the mandatory standards required by the bill.

Eight members have signed additional views opposing the present structure of the Advisory Council. They point out that last minute changes in the bill regarding the Council were approved 13 to 12 to accommodate the Secretary of Commerce by the removal of Senate confirmation of Advisory Council members. They believe that this removal will negate much of the independent thinking and judgment on motor vehicle safety problems which would otherwise be avallable to the Secretary

One member has Aled individual views warning that the bill is no cure-all; that accidents are caused by many factors, car design being only a small part. He supports the bill but fears that Federal standards may actually inhibit the development of safer cars.

Mr. Speaker, I know of no objection to the rule, and I urge that it be adopted.

Mr. MADDEN. Mr. Speaker, I yleld such time as he may require to the gentleman from Florida (Mr. BENNETT).

Mr. BENNETT. Mr. Speaker. for & decade, I have sponsored legislation to require that certain safety standards are met for all motor vehicles sold in interstate commerce. During the 89th Congress, I have introduced two bills. H.R.

19627

414, and H.R. 9303, which would establish safety standards for certain automobile equipment, and require this equipment to be included on all antomobiles sold in Interstate commerce. I am deeply concerned with this problem, as I consider it to be of the greatest national importance.

When people in our country read in the newspapers that almost 50,000 people have died during the last year in tramc accidents, they are briefly shocked. But, then they read about tragedy every day. Tragedy is something that happens to others. But every 13 minutes, some man, woman, or child is killed in tramc accidents. Every 18 seconds, somebody is injured seriously in some twisted wreckage. And yet tramc becomes heavier every day. There are more drivers, more vehicles, more miles of travel, and thus more chances of accidents. And in addition to the needless loss of wie, Npancial losses pile up at the rate of $15.000 per second. around the clock.'

Bome 606.979 Americans have been killed in all battles since the battle of Lexington in 1775, including the most recant Agures from Vietnam, yet over 1.5 million motorists have died in automobile accidents since 1899. In spite of these facts, however, the Congress has taken very little amrmative action toward curbing the rapidly rising number and cost of automobile accidents. Establishment of manufacturing standards for seat belts. and the requirement of certain safety devices on vehicles purchased by the Federal Government was a good beginning. but little more, because another record was set last year for trafic accidents and accidents continue to be the chiel cause of death in Americans aged 1 to 34.

I personally cannot think of many things more beneficial to the Nation's welfare than this Congress acting lavorably on legislation designed to end this horrible yearly death rate. In 1925 there were only 29 million licensed drivers in the United States; today there are 95 million. Yet in 1975, there will be 125 million Americans driving 117 million automobiles. In my home State of Florids alone, the number of cars will double In 10 years. These facts point up the need for effective legislation to be enacted to curb this modern tragedy of the tramc accident. The tramc safety legislation before the House today would do much to make American cars saler.

What is particularly distressing to me is that almost hall of those killed in accidents could have survived in a safe automobile. This means that we would save 25,000 Americans this year 11 their automobiles were equipped with certain safety features. President Johnson has said:

Wo cannot accept the intolerable drain on our buman and economic resource that these accidents are causing.

If we take action now to make cars themselves safer the frightening number of deaths and injuries oocurring on our highways and our streets can be dramatically reduced.

It is important that Congress act now, for every day we put off coming to grips with this problem another 57 Americans will die in unsafe motor vehicles.

Mr. QUILLEN. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Nebraska (Mr. CUNNINGHAY).

Mr. CUNNINGHAM. Mr. Speaker, I think I ought to say that I do support this bull, but I did Ale the individual views which I hope the Members will read.

I hope that none of the Members, when this bill is approved, are going to issue any kind of statement that now we have solved the accident problem w tar

vohiclo aro concerned because this bil in no wise solves that problem. In fact, it has very uttle to do with the prevention of accidents in the Arst instance.

It deals primarily with design. We have no Ngures those of us who have been in this work professionally, as I have for many years, know that there are no Agures that support any contention that the design of the automobile is the cause of accidents. So because we pass this I hope that the public will not be led to believe that we have solved this problem.

Actually, the more important blu wo will be voting on is the one that comes after this, if the schedule is followed, that comes from the Committee on Public Works. This bul gets into the guts of the problem. It was originally in our bill but because there was a condict, I believe, between the authority of the two committees, it was agreed between the respective chairmen, as I understand it, that the Committee on Public Works would take out the major portion of the bill now under consideration.

So we have a mere skeleton here which sets up standards which, as I ay, only nibbles at this, if it even goes that far.

So that the really important bill that you are going to be discussing is the one that will come out of the Committee on Public Works, which is scheduled already on the calendar. That is the one that will get at this problem to a certain degree. I thought that ought to be made clear as we go through the debate.

Yes, I support the legislation, and I do hope that you will read the minority views that I have submitted.

Mr. QUILLEN. Mr. Speaker, I have no further requests for time.

Mr. MADDEN. Mr. Speaker, I move the previous question.

The previous question was ordered.

The SPEAKER. pro tempore (Mr. ALBERT). The question is on the resolution.

The resolution was agreed to.

A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

PROVIDING FOR HIGHWAY SAFETY, RESEARCH, AND DEVELOPMENT

The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California (Mr. Sisk).

Mr. SISK. Mr. Speaker, by direction of the Committee on Rules I call up House Resolution 964, and ask for its immediate consideration.

The Clerk read the resolution, as follows:

H. RES. 984 Resolved, That upon the adoption of this rosolution it shall be in order to move that the House resolve itsell into the Committee of the Whole House on the State of the Union for the consideration of the bull (HR. 13290) to amend title 23 of the United States Code to provide for highway safety research and devolopment, certain highway safety programs, a pational driver reglater, and . highway accident research and test facility. After general debato, which shall be conOned to the bill and shall continue not to oxcood two hours, to be oqually divided and controlled by the chairman and nandung minority member of the Committee on Public Works, the bill shall be read for amondment undor tho Ave-minuto rule. It shall bo in order to considor the substitute amendment recommended by the Committee on Public Works now in the bill and much mubstitute for the purpose of amendment shall be considered under the Ave-minuto rule as an original bill. At the conclusion of such consideration the Committee shall rise and report the bill to the House with such amondments as may bave been adopted, and any Momber may demand a separate vote in tho House on any of the amondments adopted in the Committee of the whole to the bill or committee substituto. The provous question ball be condered ordered on tbo bull and amendments thereto to Apal passage without intervening motion except ono motion to recommit with or without instructions. After the passage of H.R. 13290, it shall be in order in the House to take from the Speaker's table the bill (S. 3052) and to move to strike out all after the enacting clause of sald Sonate bill and to insert in lieu thor of the provisions contained in H.R. 13290 as passed by the House

19628

Mr. SISK. Mr. Speaker, I yield 30 minutes to the gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. QUILLEN), and pending that I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Speaker, House Resolution 964 provides for consideration of H.R. 13290. & bill to amend title 23 of the United States Code to provide for highway safety research and development, certain highway Salety programs, & national driver register, and a highway accident research and test facility. The resolution provides an open rule with 2 hours of general debate, making it in order to consider the committee substitute as an original bill for the purpose of amendment. The resolution further provides that after passage of H.R. 13290 it shall be in order to take s. 3052 from the Speaker's table, strike out all after the enacting clause and insert the Housepassed language.

The deaths, the injuries, and the property damage resulting from highway accidents have continued to rise over last year's shocking statistics.

After extended hearings, extensive research, and working conferences with a wide variety of groups and officials, the Committee on Public Works reported H.R. 13290, amended, setting forth & highway safety program. With the implementation of such a program, it is hoped that highway accidents will be notably less in the future.

We have had the automobile for more than 60 years, and for almost all of that time many of the States and their pol. itical subdivisions have had programs of some kind designed to regulate the use of the automobile in the interest of public salety. For 40 years the various saletyrelated organizations, both public and private, have been trying to persuade the several state legislatures to adopt at least minimum uniform regulatory statutes, with lamentable lack of success.

All States have some statutes: & few

States have fairly extensive statutes;

only a handful of States have undertaken comprehensive highway safety programs and even these are handi. capped by gaps and deficiences and Inadequate Ananang. The states must play a paramount role in any future program.

HR. 13290 requires that each state shall have a highway salety program approved by the Secretary which is in accordance with uniform standards to be promulgated by the Secretary. The secretary shall not act unilaterally in developing these standards. The bill specifically requires that the Secretary shall work with the States, their political subdivisions, other Federal departments, and public and private organizations, in developing these standards.

The bull requires that the Secretary shall report to the Congress by no later than January 10, 1987, the standards to be Initially applied; that the Secretary shall substantially broaden his avenues of consultation; that he shall seek the guidance of people who are experienced in the many aspects of highway salety: that he shall submit his proposed standards to review by the National Highway Safety Advisory Committee which the legislation would establish, and that he shall do all of this without delay.

The actual working programs must remain in the hands of the States, the Federal Government can and must assume a position of leadership in the field. It Is anticipated that the Federal program. workdng through the Secretary of Commerce, will enhance, not impair, the responsibilities of the States.

Mr. Speaker, I urge the adoption of House Resolution 964 in order that H.R. 13290 may be considered.

Mr. QUILLEN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.

Mr. Speaker, as the gentleman from California has stated, House Resolution 964 makes in order the consideration of H.R. 13290, the Highway Safety Act of 1966, under an open rule with 2 hours of general debate, making it in order to consider the committee substitute as an original bill for purposes of amendment under the 5-minute rule.

The purpose of the bill 18 to amend title 23 of the United States Code, pertaining to Federal highway programs to include a new chapter entitled "Highway Saloty." The new chapter will include current and new Federal safety program, and further coordination of the various State and local highway safety programs.

Each State is required to have a highway safety program, conforming to criteris set by the Secretary of Commerce as performance standards. Each State program must be approved by the Secretary. Alms of the program are to improve driver and pedestrian performance, set up & system of records of accidents. accident investigation procedures, vehicle registration and safety Inspection, highway design, and correction of high accident locations.

Federal funds in fiscal 1967 and 1968 are to be divided among the States by the Secretary on the basis of 75 percent for population and 25 percent as the Secretary may deem appropriate to carry out the nationwide aim of the program. By January 1, 1969, and the Secretary must

an 60 years the states ad programs

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