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Section 302 requires the Secretary to report the results of this study to Congress by December 31, 1967. This report is required to include (1) an inventory of existing capabilities, equipment, and facilities which could be used by the Secretary in carrying out this research, development, and testing; (2) recommendations for sites; (3) preliminary plans, specifications, and drawings; and (4) estimated cost of the recommended sites, facilities, and equipment.

Section 303 authorizes the appropriation of not to exceed $3 million for this investigation, study, and report.

The introduced bill included both an authorization of $3 million for planning and unlimited authorization for the construction of research and test facilities. The committee has limited this title to a planning program. It does not question that facilities in addition to those in existence may be needed but it does believe that both public and private existing facilities should first be considered. The provisions of this title will allow a full investigation and report and evaluation by both the Secretary and Congress before entering into a new construction program.

Title IV-National Driver Register Section 401 of the reported bill is a complete revision of the act of July 14, 1960 (23 U.S.C. 313 note).

The first section of this revision authorizes the Secretary of Commerce to establish and maintain á register identifying each individual reported to him by a State or political subdivision thereof as one with respect to whom such State or political subdivision has denied, terminated, or temporarily withdrawn (except a withdrawal for less than six months based on a series of nonmoving violations) an individual's license or privilege to operate a motor vehicle.

Section 2 of the revision requires the Secretary, but only at the request of the State or Federal department or agency, to furnish information contained in the register, except that such information is to be furnished only to the requesting party and only with respect to an individual applicant for a motor vehicle operator's license or permit.

The third section of the revision is a definition of the term “State" to include not only the States, but the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia, Guam, the Virgin Islands, the Canal Zone, and American Samoa.

The revision of the driver register service in this title will strengthen and expand it to include identification of any individual whose license has been denied, revoked, or suspended, except for suspensions for less than 6 months based on nonmoving violations. The Secretary is given the authority to include in the register any class of denials, revocations, or suspension that is sufficiently common among the States to make the information mutually useful. The committee has been informed that the present driver register service processes some 45,000 daily inquiries. No doubt under the revision proposed these inquiries will increase. The committee considered the question of whether or not political subdivisions of States and officials thereof should be free to make inquiries to gain information from the national driver register and determine that this provision should not be so extended because in the first instance an official in a political subdivision can consult his own State department of motor vehicles and if appropriate the information requested could be transmitted on to the Federal Government by the State.

AGENCY VIEWS
THE GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE TREASURY,

Washington, D.C., March 15, 1966.
Hon. HARLEY O. STAGGERS,
Chairman, Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce,
House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.

DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: Reference is made to your request for the views of this Department on H.R. 13228 to provide for a coordinated national safety program and establishment of safety standards for motor vehicles in interstate commerce to reduce traffic accidents and the deaths, injuries, and property damage which occur in such accidents.

The proposed legislation would authorize the Secretary of Transportation to establish and enforce motor vehicle safety standards and to assist States in establishing highway safety programs. Section 107 of the bill would, among other things, prohibit the importation of motor vehicles not conforming to standards but would authorize the Secretary of Transportation and the Secretary of the Treasury to permit the temporary importation of certain nonconforming vehicles.

The proposed legislation incorporates the provisions of the Traffic Safety Act of 1966, which was introduced in response to the recommendation of the President in his message of March 2, 1966, on the proposed Department of Transportation.

The Department recommends the enactment of H.R. 13228.

The Department has been advised by the Bureau of the Budget that there is no objection to the submission of this report to your committee and that enactment of H.R. 13228 would be in accord with the program of the President. Sincerely yours,

FRED B. SMITH, Acting General Counsel.

GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION,

Washington, D.C., March 21, 1966. Hon. HARLEY O. STAGGERS, Chairman, Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.

DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: Your letter of March 4, 1966, requested any comments that the General Services Administration may care to offer concerning H.R. 13228, 89th Congress, a bill to provide for a coordinated national safety program and establishment of safety standards for motor vehicles in interstate commerce to reduce traffic accidents and the deaths, injuries, and property damage which occur in such accidents.

The bill would provide for a national program of highway safety, including intensification of research into the causes of highway accidents, improvement of minimum safety standards for the highway, vehicle, and driver, and for assistance and encouragement to the States to develop programs for improvement of highway safety.

As operator of one of the largest vehicular fleets in the United States, GSA is vitally concerned about highway safety. In addition, GSA has the responsibility, pursuant to Public Law 88–515 and sections 206(a)(4) and 211(a) (5) of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, as amended (40 U.S.C. 487(a)(4), 491(a)(5)), for prescribing standards for vehicles purchased by the Government. Pursuant to our authority, we have issued Federal Standard No. 515, which was published in the Federal Register on June 30, 1965 (30 F.R. 8319). "GSA intends to revise this standard from year to year as the science of automotive safety advances.

We believe that a national program of highway safety such as that provided for in H.R. 13228 would substantially reduce the current toll in highway deaths and injuries. GSA, therefore, favors its early enactment.

If H.R. 13228 is enacted, GSA would be happy to share its experience in the field of automotive safety with the appropriate Federal authority, to assist in the development of safety standards under title II of the bill, and to coordinate them with existing GSA standards.

The financial effects of this measure cannot be estimated.

The Bureau of the Budget has advised that there is no objection to the submission of this report to your committee and that the enactment of H.R. 13228 would be in accord with the program of the President. Sincerely yours,

Lawson B. Knott, Jr.,

Administrator.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT,

BUREAU OF THE BUDGET,

Washington, D.C., March 25, 1966. Hon. HARLEY O. STAGGERS, Chairman, Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.

DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: This is in reply to your request for the views of the Bureau of the Budget on H.R. 13228, a bill to provide for a coordinated national safety program and establishment of safety standards for motor vehicles in interstate commerce to reduce traffic accidents and the deaths, injuries, and property damage which occur in such accidents, and on other bills relating to traffic safety.

H.R. 13228 would give to the Secretary of Transportation discretionary authority to set safety standards for motor vehicles sold in interstate commerce; would authorize the Secretary to conduct and contract for research to determine appropriate safety standards; would authorize the planning, construction, and operation of a Traffic Accident and Injury Research and Test Facility; would authorize grants to States on a matching basis to aid them in the development of comprehensive State highway safety programs which would be in accordance with standards approved by the Secretary; would authorize research into all phases of highway safety; and would authorize the establishment of a National Driver Register.

As the administration bill, H.R. 13228 contains the President's major recommendations on traffic safety as set forth in his recent transportation message. This bill will provide a vigorous systematic attack on the problem of death, injury, and destruction on the Nation's highways. The bill gives Federal leadership to the drive for increased traffic safety but maintains the traditional cooperation between State and Federal authorities and between public and private efforts.

There are several bills before the Congress relating to traffic safety. In general, the objectives of these bills are consistent with the administration's traffic safety goals. The administration bill, however, combines the best features of these bills into a comprehensive, administratively flexible program which would systematically marshal the Nation's resources to reduce traffic accidents, deaths, injuries, and damage.

For the foregoing reasons the Bureau of the Budget believes that the administration's program, as embodied in H.R. 13228, represents the most effective approach to increased traffic safety and, therefore, strongly urges its enactment. Sincerely yours,

WILFRED H. ROMMEL, Acting Assistant Director for Legislative Reference.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE,

Washington, D.C., April 5, 1966. Hon. HARLEY O. STAGGERS, Chairman, Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.

DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: This letter is in response to your request of March 4, 1966, for a report on H.R. 13228, a bill to provide for a coordinated national safety program and establishment of safety standards for motor vehicles in interstate commerce to reduce traffic accidents and the deaths, injuries, and property damage which occur in such accidents.

The bill would provide authority for the Secretary of Transportation to establish motor vehicle safety standards for motor vehicles and equipment in interstate commerce; to undertake and support necessary safety research and development; and to encourage and provide financial assistance in developing State traffic safety programs under effective standards for drivers, motor vehicles, postaccident care and the traffic environment, including highways. It would authorize and direct the Secretary of Transportation to assist and cooperate with other Federal departments and agencies, State and local governments, private industry, and other interested parties, to increase highway safety.

The bill would direct the Secretary to review existing public and private motor vehicle safety standards. If at any time after 2 years from the date of enactment he determines that there is need for a new or revised motor vehicle safety standard, in the light of certain specified considerations, he would be authorized to establish and issue by order appropriate Federal motor vehicle safety standards for motor vehicles or motor vehicle equipment. To accomplish these purposes, the Secretary would be authorized to undertake appropriate research in cooperation with other Federal departments and agencies. Authority would also be granted for the Secretary, acting independently, or in cooperation with other Federal departments or agencies to plan, design, construct, maintain, and operate a facility or facilities in which research development and testing would be conducted. By amendment of section 301 of title 23, United States Code, the Secretary would be authorized and directed to assist and cooperate with other Federal departments and agencies, State and local governments, private industry, and other interested parties, to increase highway safety. Each of the States would be assisted to establish a highway safety program including, but not limited to, provisions for an effective accident record system, measures to improve driver performance, vehicle safety, highway design and maintenance, traffic control, and surveillance of traffic for detection and correction of high or potentially high accident locations. He would also be authorized to expand the highway safety research and development activities under section 307(a) of title 23, United States Code, to cover all aspects of highway safety, including, but not limited to, highway systems research and development relating to vehicle, highway and driver characteristics, accident investigations, emergency medical care, and transportation of the injured. Appropriated funds could be used in cooperation with other Federal departments or agencies for grants to State or local agencies, institutions, and individuals for training or education of highway safety personnel, research fellowships in highway safety, development of improved accident investigation procedures, community emergency medical services plans, demonstration projects and related activities. The use of highway trust funds would be authorized for all of the foregoing purposes.

This bill would provide a needed total and coordinated Federal effort and program in highway safety. This Department has long recognized a need for increased, coordinated governmental efforts to deal more effectively with the problem of preventing the annual toll of motor vehicle deaths and motor vehicle injuries in the United States. The responsibility for action in preventing motor vehicle deaths and injuries must be shared by several departments of Government and many voluntary and private agencies. This Department has a background of operating experience and professional competency to contribute to this coordinated effort. We have developed and are carrying out a realistic and comprehensive plan for overall injury reduction. This plan recognizes that the complex problems associated with motor vehicle deaths and injuries are such as to require the best effort of many public and private agencies and a variety of professional skills.

In furtherance of the objectives of this bill, we would anticipate continuing and expanding our efforts relating to the medical aspects of driver licensing, accident investigation, medical care of the injured, and driver and traffic safety education. We are pleased to note that section 307 would provide for maintaining confidentiality of individual special investigation reports, and that section 308 provides for maintaining existing responsibilities of other agencies in the areas of traffic safety and injury prevention.

In view of the significant benefits to the public welfare from a reduction of highway accidents, injuries, and death which could result

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