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dor par

nt note ion and ama. It prship of 1 almost

what is life, and bited by utter and ne Scandi

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· Discords' and Mr well-doing; his wife Rita, a neuJude the Obscure.' To rotic “she-animal,”-she, all for 1, one would think that the “roses and raptures”; he, preleeting moments of hap- ferring the “lilies and languors,' e authors enjoy is when —and the pantomime witch or

invent some new thrill Rat-wife, who is, according to the er. Their characters move critics, “ a heavenly messenger," an atmosphere of intense and apparently symbolical of any.

They not only torture thing you please. Two mortal ves and each other, but hours those two poor unbalanced id of Destiny lies heavy creatures, the Allmers, spent in jem. They are driven by dismal psychologising and mutual cumstance, or the Zeitgeist; torment and self - torture. The ogs of the inexplicable, of acting was excellent, and it was y, and everything else that an intellectual treat to see three leasant. Never for an in- such artists Mrs Patrick

regardless of their doom, Campbell, Miss Robins, and Miss jese wretched victims sport, Janet Achurch on the stage tole spirit of humour is not in gether. Everything that art can

They may “take love as an do was done to infuse life and yne to deaden the agony of reality into these doleful marionzht," but the result is always nettes, but the general impression Ily depressing, for their malady the two Allmers made on my e malady of despair.

mind was

that of a couple of le have lately been witness- epileptics exercising in the hosa slight recrudescence of the pital grounds. In particular, in “boom”; so, being natur- Miss Achurch's scream at the

interested in the father of end of the first Act, which has

new psychology, I attended been much admired by connoismatinée of “Little Eyolf” at seurs in painful sensations, re» Avenue theatre. I arrived called vividly to my mind the sly, but found the house al- screeching of a woman whom I ady full.

There was a small once had the misfortune to see rinkling of males, but woman fall down in an epileptic fit. id assembled in force to do However, the audience, or rather onour to the Master who head- some of the female portion of it, d the revolt of her sex. The seemed at times much affected, lew culture and the newest chif- and sobs and tears occasionally fon were alike represented in the greeted such passages in the drama audience, proving that intellec as were especially lugubrious. The tual womanhood has listened to males, I regret to say, were more Mrs Roy Devereux and once more disposed to chuckle irreverently, begun (did it ever cease ?) to probably because the contemplabeautify itself in real earnest. tion of nervous disorders and the Through a forest of colossal and whinings of sexual hysteria, and befeathered hats I obtained occa other forms of mental disease, less sional glimpses of the stage and arouse the sympathy of the dull the performers engaged in their masculine mind." "Morbid trash," self-appointed but depressing task my nearest neighbour ejaculated as

the hero, the usual Ibsenite we emerged into the comparativeidiot or travesty of a man, with a ly pure atmosphere of a London chronic but futile appetite for fog; while I went home and read

VOL. CLXI.--NO. DCCCCLXXV.

un, named

ve probed ses of the 3 victims quish and

we learn Woman, the heart - wound”; Ee mental eir faculty Ehe spot," make the be at all. lay of this all the dehey call it und signifiere not deit simply There are

y different

both exces. ll serve to

ng: Mrs

H

[graphic]

112

114

say that the whole thing is mere tions. There are still many left literary and journalistic froth, who have the pluck to say that, just as the New Woman was said in spite of all temptations to to be solely a creation of the comic belong to the opposite sex, they newspapers--and that the sex is prefer to remain as they are. no more uneasy in its mind than Much has been done already, it was formerly. Surely, however, especially in the way of relaxing the evidence is all the other way. certain stupid social conventions, The New Woman is simply the to make their lives freer and hapwoman of to-day striving to shake pier than they were before, and off old shackles

, and the immense more, doubtless, will be done in the mass of “ revolting" literature can- future. To take one stra] idnot have grown out of nothing, or stance, the bicycle, tbrazk it sose continue to flourish upon mere respecte it has added a net terras curiosity. Mrs Derereor's chap to ife

, has certain. See more ter on « The Feminine Potential to take on ost of tong ta contains some caustie satire an eod iza to iz 2297 the skam realise with which see beer. I 23 Derhat Fora novadars saterate that i pece Varie Busut seek and their ezt a the ti o I' I ILI?

et i rinat decides 1972 TNT 2-41237792* impor a form of inszenia si mr der EZİ 2312 TL: upen a merend appear be in me The ting with sin, so dire di the Doden roman

Besides being the catrai và raras of the most vihan visible sign of our moden mee de 2017 en pre of the nerves, these books are also se o 2002 an undoubted aggravation of the kind of I, disorder. If one asks what is the books of the Kers.cz good of it all, one is told that it bat there is also a soft dri

worst

The Psychology of Peminisma
Mar Nordaa's chapter on Ibsen in time went about wearing low-cat
-D-generation, and felt better. olan snd s terrible soul de

The author of this dismal and noting their riews of the mirry eril-sme. iing pay is certainly one and bopelassness of life. These of the portents of the age. He riems rere probabs derived from voices better than any one else its rerses like the foclowing: morbid tendencies, and, although

* We wither fria our rocza, we op a man, he is distinctly the founder

& marof the new so-called science of

Siak, sek; entend the boon, unfeminine psychology. That is to sissed the thirst. say, he above all others has di Thought to the last in renge of our rected the energies of the woman decay, psychologist into the channels Some phantom lures, such as they now run in. To my humble soc ut at tina

Bat all too late are we doubly way of thinking, these semi-insane weaklings and irresponsible neuro

Lore, fame, ambition, ararice-'tis paths of the Ibsenite drama are

the same, neither admirable nor interesting. Each idle, and all ill, and none the They are simply "sick” men and women; degenerates to be shunned, For all are meteors with a different

name, like any other manifestations of

And Death the sable smoke where disease. And yet they serve as

ranishes the diame." the pattern and type of characters in books and plays innumerable This stanza contains as good psy. that have taken hold of the public chology and as good philosophy mind. It would be interesting to as any Scandinavian drama, while know how far this literature is the there is something almost elevatcause, and how far simply the ex- ing in the swing and rhythm of the pression, of the morbid tendencies majestic verse compared with the of which I have spoken. The commonplace and the banalités of shockingly improper young person Ibsen's “Ollendorttian " dialogue. in Miss Marie Corelli's Sorrows No doubt the Byronie morbidity of Satan,' who would have flirted was all affectation, but so to a great with the Devil if that more self- extent is the psychology and morbid respecting personage had permitted pessimism of these days. Marie her, attributed her moral downfall Bashkirtseff was a walking affectato our modern literature of de- tion, a mere pose in petticoats, but cadence. It was the “satyr- she succeeded in making herself songster," Swinburne, and those intensely miserable. And it seems wicked women novelists, who certain that the same process of wrought all the mischief. Max needless self-torture is at work in Nordau thinks that the influence some women's minds now. It is of polite literature on life is much difficult to explain on any other greater than that of life on polite hypothesis their craving for the literature. He mentions several literature of hysteria or decadence instances of fashions being set by ---the doleful squalor of Ibsen, the books, the most remarkable one mawkishness of the neurotic being the epidemic of suicide that fiction writers, or that strange broke out in Germany after the blend of "hoggishness and hyspublication of The Sorrows of teria,” to borrow & truculent Young Werther.' Every one knows critic's phrase, 'Jude the Obscure.' that the young men in Byron's I know there are people who

is inevitable. But surely morbid- pain. So one can read them ity is a disease which can be com- without seeing that the writers bated like other diseases, and have felt, and feit deeply; but equally, on the other hand, ag. while their dolefulness may comgravated by continually dwelling mand our sympathy, the expres on morbid subjects. And, after sion of it in hysterical or squalid all, the world is not made up stories is not to be encouraged, for entirely of refuse - heaps or hos- it does but add one grain more to pitals ; and no sort of good can the heap of humanity's woes. The come out of this literary scavenging sale of these books by thousands and constant removal of the rags is not a healthy sign. People read that cover poor humanity's sores. them because they are interested That life is full of suffering, and in them, and the interest arises that women have more than their from the fact that what they read fair share of it, are facts suffi- corresponds to something in their ciently sad in themselves without own natures. Fru Hansson teils perpetually harping upon them, us that when 'Keynotes' was pubOf all regrets

, we are told, "the lished the critics said that the nausea of ser is the rainest, the heroines were exceptional types ; mest futile"; and surely even the but the critics, as usual

, were lot of women has its compense wrong. **Good bearens ! How

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t the whole thing is mere tions. There are still many left

and journalistic froth- who have the pluck to say that, the New Woman was said in spite of all temptations to olely a creation of the comic belong to the opposite sex, they a pers—and that the sex is prefer to remain as they are. vre uneasy in its mind than Much has been done already, formerly. Surely, however, especially in the way of relaxing vidence is all the other way. certain stupid social conventions, New Woman is simply the to make their lives freer and hapan of to-day striving to shake pier than they were before, and ld shackles, and the immense more, doubtless, will be done in the

of “revolting "literature can future. To take one small inhave grown out of nothing, or stance, the bicycle, though in some inue

to flourish upon mere respects it has added a new terror osity. Mrs Devereux's chap- to life, has certainly done something

« The Feminine Potential” to take women out of themselves, itains some caustic satire on and thus to lighten the load they ► sbam realism with which some bear. I cannot help thinking that men nowadays saturate their if poor Marie Bashkirtseff had als, and their “cult of the gut- only possessed a “bike,” it might

is unkindly described as have prolonged her life by render“simply a form of hysteria based ing her less self-centred and misupon a morbid appetite for coquet- erable than she was. ting with sin, so characteristic of There is much that is pathetic he modern woman."

in the self - questioning and the Besides being the outward and cravings of the type of woman visible sign of our modern malaise depicted in neurotic fiction. There of the nerves, these books are also is a note of infinite weariness, a an undoubted aggravation of the kind of anæmic despondency, in disorder. If one asks what is the books of the ‘Keynotes' class; good of it all, one is told that it but there is also a note of real is inevitable. But surely morbid- pain.

No one

read them ity is a disease which can be com without seeing that the writers bated like other diseases, and have felt, and felt deeply; but equally, on the other hand, ag- while their dolefulness may comgravated by continually dwelling mand our sympathy, the expreson morbid subjects. And, after sion of it in hysterical or squalid all, the world is not made up stories is not to be encouraged, for entirely of refuse - heaps or hos- it does but add one grain more to pitals; and no sort of good can the heap of humanity's woes. The come out of this literary scavenging sale of these books by thousands and constant removal of the rags is not a healthy sign. People read that cover poor humanity's sores. them because they are interested That life is full of suffering, and in them, and the interest arises that women have more than their from the fact that what they read fair share of it, are facts suffi- corresponds to something in their ciently sad in themselves without own natures. Fru Hansson teils perpetually harping upon them. us that when Keynotes' was pubOf all regrets, we are told, “the lished the critics said that the nausea of sex is the vainest, the heroines were exceptional types ; most futile”; and surely even the but the critics, as usual, were lot of women has its compensa- wrong.

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Max Nordau's chapter on Ibsen in time went about wearing low-cut Degeneration,' and felt better. collars and a terrible scowl, de

The author of this dismal and noting their views of the misery evil-smelling play is certainly one and hopelessness of life. These of the portents of the age. He views were probably derived from voices better than any one else its verses like the following :morbid tendencies, and, although

" We wither from our youth, we gasp a man, he is distinctly the founder

awayof the new so-called science of

Sick, sick; unfound the boon, unfeminine psychology. That is to slaked the thirst. say, he above all others has di Though to the last in verge of our rected the energies of the woman decay, psychologist into the channels Some phantom lures, such as they now run in. To my humble sought at first

But all too late—so are we doubly way of thinking, these semi-insane

curst. weaklings and irresponsible neuro

Love, fame, ambition, avarice—'tis paths of the Ibsenite drama are neither admirable nor interesting. Each idle, and all ill, and none the They are simply “sick” men and

worst women; degenerates to be shunned, For all are meteors with a different

name, like any other manifestations of

And Death the sable smoke where disease. And yet they serve as

vanishes the flame." the pattern and type of characters in books and plays innumerable This stanza contains as good psythat have taken hold of the public chology and as good philosophy mind. It would be interesting to as any Scandinavian drama, while know how far this literature is the there is something almost elevatcause, and how far simply the ex- ing in the swing and rhythm of the pression, of the morbid tendencies majestic verse compared with the of which I have spoken. The commonplace and the banalités of shockingly improper young person Ibsen's “Ollendorffian" dialogue. in Miss Marie Oorelli's Sorrows No doubt the Byronic morbidity of Satan,' who would have flirted was all affectation, but so to a great with the Devil if that more self extent is the psychology and morbid respecting personage had permitted pessimism of these days. Marie her, attributed her moral downfall Bashkirtseff was a walking affectato our modern literature of de- tion, a mere pose in petticoats, but cadence.

the "satyr- she succeeded in making herself songster," Swinburne, and those intensely miserable. And it seems wicked

novelists, who certain that the same process of wrought all the mischief. Max needless self-torture is at work in Nordau thinks that the influence some women's minds now. It is of polite literature on life is much difficult to explain on any other greater than that of life on polite hypothesis their craving for the literature. He mentions several literature of hysteria or decadence instances of fashions being set by the doleful squalor of Ibsen, the books, the most remarkable one mawkishness the neurotic being the epidemic of suicide that fiction writers, or that strange broke out in Germany after the blend of “hoggishness and hyspublication of The Sorrows of teria," to borrow

a truculent Young Werther.' Every one knows critic's phrase, "Jude the Obscure.' that the young men in Byron's I know there are people who

It

was

women

of

say that the whole thing is mere tions. There are still many left literary and journalistic froth, who have the pluck to say that, just as the New Woman was said in spite of all temptations to to be solely a creation of the comic belong to the opposite sex, they newspapers—and that the sex is prefer to remain as they are. no more uneasy in its mind than Much has been done already, it was formerly. Surely, however, especially in the way of relaxing the evidence is all the other way. certain stupid social conventions, The New Woman is simply the to make their lives freer and hapwoman of to-day striving to shake pier than they were before, and off old shackles, and the immense more, doubtless, will be done in the mass of “revolting ”literature can future. To take one small innot have grown out of nothing, or stance, the bicycle, though in some continue to flourish upon mere respects it has added a new terror curiosity. Mrs Devereux's chap- to life, has certainly done something ter on “The Feminine Potential” to take women out of themselves, contains some caustic satire on and thus to lighten the load they the sbam realism with which some bear. I cannot help thinking that women nowadays saturate their if poor Marie Bashkirtseff had souls, and their “cult of the gut. only possessed a “bike,” it might ter" is unkindly described as have prolonged her life by render“simply a form of hysteria based ing her less self-centred and misupon a morbid appetite for coquet- erable than she was. ting with sin, so characteristic of There is much that is pathetic the modern woman.”

in the self - questioning and the Besides being the outward and cravings of the type of woman visible sign of our modern malaise depicted in neurotic fiction. There of the nerves, these books are also is a note of infinite weariness, a an undoubted aggravation of the kind of anemic despondency, in disorder. If one asks what is the books of the Keynotes' class ; good of it all, one is told that it but there is also a note of real is inevitable. But surely morbid- pain. No one

can read them ity is a disease which can be com without seeing that the writers bated like other diseases, and have felt, and felt deeply; but equally, on the other hand, ag- while their dolefulness may comgravated by continually dwelling mand our sympathy, the expreson morbid subjects. And,

And, after sion of it in hysterical or squalid all, the world is not made up stories is not to be encouraged, for entirely of refuse - heaps or hos- it does but add one grain more to pitals; and no sort of good can the heap of humanity's woes. The come out of this literary scavenging sale of these books by thousands and constant removal of the rags is not a healthy sign. People read that cover poor humanity's sores. them because they are interested That life is full of suffering, and in them, and the interest arises that women have more than their from the fact that what they read fair share of it, are facts suffi- corresponds to something in their ciently sad in themselves without own natures. Fru Hansson tells perpetually harping upon them. us that when ·Keynotes' was pubOf all regrets, we are told, "the lished the critics said that the nausea of sex is the vainest, the heroines were exceptional types ; most futile"; and surely even the but the critics, as usual, were lot of women has its compensa- wrong. “Good heavens! How

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