A Historical Description of Westminster Abbey, Its Monuments and Curiosities

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Vergers in the Abbey, 1893 - Westminster (London, England) - 132 pages

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Page 9 - God; we acknowledge thee to be the Lord. All the earth doth worship thee, the Father everlasting. To thee all Angels cry aloud; the Heavens, and all the powers therein. To thee Cherubim and Seraphim continually do cry, Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God of Sabaoth; Heaven and earth are full of the Majesty of thy Glory.
Page 34 - Let us now praise famous men, and our fathers that begat us. The Lord hath wrought great glory by them through His great power from the beginning.
Page 93 - The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away, and blessed be the name of the Lord.
Page 124 - Rejoice the soul of thy servant : for unto thee, O Lord, do I lift up my soul.
Page 34 - But will God indeed dwell on the earth ? behold, the heaven and heaven of heavens cannot contain thee ; how much less this house that I have builded...
Page 109 - Unblam'd through life, lamented in thy end. These are thy honours ! not that here thy bust Is mix'd with heroes, or with kings thy dust ; But that the Worthy and the Good shall say, Striking their pensive bosoms — Here lies GAY.
Page 33 - When I see kings lying by those who deposed them, when I consider rival wits placed side by side, or the holy men that divided the world with their contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the little competitions, factions and debates of mankind.
Page 33 - When I look upon the tombs of the great, every emotion of envy dies in me; when I read the epitaphs of the beautiful, every inordinate desire goes out; when I meet with the grief of parents upon a tomb-stone, my heart melts with compassion; when I see the tomb of the parents themselves, I consider the vanity of grieving for those whom we must quickly follow...
Page 36 - THOSE WHO BEST DESERVE THEIR GRATITUDE THE KING HIS MINISTERS, AND MANY OF THE NOBLES AND COMMONERS OF THE REALM RAISED THIS MONUMENT TO JAMES WATT WHO DIRECTING THE FORCE OF AN ORIGINAL GENIUS EARLY EXERCISED IN PHILOSOPHIC RESEARCH TO THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE...
Page 111 - The eclipse of Nature spreads my pall, — The majesty of Darkness shall Receive my parting ghost. This spirit shall return to Him That gave its heavenly spark; Yet think not, Sun, it shall be dim When thou thyself art dark ! No! it shall live again, and shine In bliss unknown to beams of thine ; By Him recall'd to breath, Who captive led Captivity, Who robb'd the grave of Victory — And took the sting from Death.

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