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TERMINATION OF THE LATE WAR.

TO WHICH IS PREFIXED,

A VIEW OF THE PROGRESSIVE IMPROVEMENT OF ENGLAND,

IN PROSPERITY AND STRENGTH, TO THE

ACCESSION OF HIS MAJESTY.

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INSKEEP & BRADFORD, NEW YORK, & WILLIAM MILHENNEY,

BOSTON.
THOMAS L. PLOWMAN, PRINTER.

1811.

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HISTORY

OF THE

REIGN OF GEORGE III.

CHAP. XXXII.

General election. Meeting of parliament and commence

ment of Mr. Pitt's administration.-The king's speech. State of the empire when Mr. Pitt's ministry commenced. -Objects which he proposes to pursue.-First efforts directed to finance.--Bill for the prevention of smuggling. -Commutation act.--Arguments against and for it. Regulation on duties for British spirits.-Preliminary motions for the relief of the East India company.

-Bilt for the regulation of India. Arguments against it.Arguments for it.-Comparison of the two bills as resulting from the characters of their authors.--Debate on the Westminster election.--Mr. Dundas proposes the restoration of the forfeited estates.--A law passed for that purpose.-Labours of Mr. Pitt in investigating the public accounts.-Supplies.--Loan and Taxes.Session closes.

XXXII.

1784.

aleetion.

BY dissolving the parliament, his majesty virtu- CHAP. ally asked the question, Did your late representatives speak your sense, or not? If they did, you will reelect them; if not, you will choose others. Thus interrogated, General the greater part of the people answered, No; and a very 'considerable majority of members friendly to Mr. Pitt was returned. As far as popular opinion can be a test of either merit or demerit, it was decidedly favourable to the minister, and inimical to his opponents. The general conduct of Mr. Fox often has been erroneously estimated

XXXII.

1784.

CHAP by those who considered defects, without comprehendir

the excellencies of his plans, acts, and character; but neve

was he less popular than after his India bill and contes Contest for with the sovereign. Still, however, he retained grea Westmin- favour in some parts of the kingdom, especially in West influence of minster, and his election was the most noted of any tha a beautiful occurred for the new parliament. The candidates were lady.

lord Hood, who had so eminently distinguished himsel
with Rodney, Mr. Fox, and sir Cecil Wray; of whom the
two last were the late members. Wrav had been origi-
nally chosen through the interest of Mr. Fox, but now
abandoned that gentleman and joined lord Hood. For
several days, Mr. Fox was superior to either of his com-
petitors ; but his majority afterwards rapidly decreased,
and he became inferior to sir Cecil Wray, who was far sur-
passed by the naval candidate. On the 11th day of the
poll he was three hundred and eighteen behind Wray: but
an interference now took place that changed the face of
affairs. A lady of very high rank, still more eminent for
beauty than for condition, one of our lovely countrywomen,
who demonstrate that, in celebrating a Venus or a
Helen, poets do not exceed nature and experience, warmly
interested herself in the election of Mr. Fox, with a suc-
cess far beyond the hopes of the favoured candidate.
Animated by personal friendship, and inspired with an
ardent zeal for what she conceived to be a public benefit,
this exalted woman undertook a personal canvass in favour
of the losing candidate, and was not to be deterred by any
inconveniences of the pursuit, or by the strictures of the
opposite party upon active efforts which were so efficacious
towards the attainment of the object. Many voters indeed,
though far from approving of Mr. l'ox's political princi-
ples and conduct, could not withstand the fascinating
eloqnence of so impressive an advocate; they might have
resisted the 'utmost efforts of the brilliant genius of an
Erskine or a Sheridan, but could not withstand the brilliant
eyes of the dutchess : these two great masters of the
pathetic might have in vain attempted to canvass for their
brother orator ; persuasion sat on the lips and dimpled in
the smiles of the beautiful Devonshire, pleading for her
brother whig. Persons too callous to yield to the applica-

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