Tibetan Buddhist Philosophy of Mind and Nature

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Oxford University Press, Dec 18, 2018 - Religion - 320 pages
Tibetan Buddhist Philosophy of Mind and Nature offers an engaging philosophical overview of Tibetan Buddhist thought. Integrating competing and complementary perspectives on the nature of mind and reality, Douglas Duckworth reveals the way that Buddhist theory informs Buddhist practice in various Tibetan traditions. Duckworth draws upon a contrast between phenomenology and ontology to highlight distinct starting points of inquiries into mind and nature in Buddhism, and to illuminate central issues confronted in Tibetan Buddhist philosophy. This thematic study engages some of the most difficult and critical topics in Buddhist thought, such as the nature of mind and the meaning of emptiness, across a wide range of philosophical traditions, including the "Middle Way" of Madhyamaka, Yogacara (also known as "Mind-Only"), and tantra. Duckworth provides a richly textured overview that explores the intersecting nature of mind, language, and world depicted in Tibetan Buddhist traditions. Further, this book puts Tibetan philosophy into conversation with texts and traditions from India, Europe, and America, exemplifying the possibility and potential for a transformative conversation in global philosophy.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Between Construction and Immediacy
9
2 Nonduality of Madhyamaka and Yogācāra
27
3 SelfAwareness and the SubjectObject
67
4 Concepts and the Nonconceptual
89
5 Radical Phenomenology
117
Conclusion
153
Appendices
155
Bibliography
287
Index
305
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About the author (2018)

Douglas Duckworth is Associate Professor in the Department of Religion at Temple University. He is the author of Mipam on Buddha-Nature: The Ground of the Nyingma Tradition and Jamgön Mipam: His Life and Teachings. He also introduced and translated Distinguishing the Views and Philosophies: Illuminating Emptiness in a Twentieth-Century Tibetan Buddhist Classic by Bötrül. He serves as the co-editor of the Journal of Buddhist Philosophy.

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