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VOLUMES I. II. III. & IV. OF THE JOURNAL OF BOTANY."

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THE

JOURNAL OF BOTANY,

BRITISH AND FOREIGN.

ON CAMELLIA JAPONICA, VAR. VARIEGATA, A NEW

VARIEGATED CAMELLIA.
BY BERTHOLD SEEMANN, PH.D., F.L.S.R

(PLATE XLII.) When publishing my monograph of the genera Camellia and Thea (Transactions of the Linnean Society, vol. xxii. p. 337), I stated that though we had thousands of representations of the various varieties of Camellia Japonica, we did not possess a single plate exhibiting the normal state of it, even Siebold and Zuccarini, in their

Flora Japonica,' having figured a form with semi-double flowers. Mr. William Bull's establishment for the introduction of new and rare plants, has lately supplied me with what I have wished to see for years,-a Camellia Japonica with normal flowers,—and I have hastened to give a plate of it. In a horticultural point of view the plant is remarkable for its pretty variegated leaves, which, at a time when such foliage is fashionable, is sure to make it a great favourite. The plant was introduced from China by Mr. Robert Fortune, and is now flowering in Mr. Bull's nursery. It somewhat differs in the shape of the foliage from the normal type of C. Japonica, and if it was not for its glabrous, 3-celled ovary, might be suspected of being a new species.

Camellia Japonica, Linn., var. variegata, Seem. (Tab. XLII.), foliis ellipticis v. subovato-ellipticis acuminatis basi acutis, albo-marginatis,

VOL. IV. (JANUARY 1, 1866.]

subtus subaveniis; floribus inodoris ; petalis 5 (roseis) rotundatis v. obovato-rotundatis, æstivatione quincuncialibus ; staminibus pistilloque glabris ; antheris ovatis acutis ; ovario 3-loculari; stylis 3 connatis, apice liberis recurvis, intus stigmatosis; capsula ignota.Variegated Camellia, Hortulanorum.

EXPLANATION OF PLATE XLII., representing Camellia Japonica variegata, from specimens kindly furnished by Mr. William Bull. Fig. 1. The two inner free stamens and part of the outer monadelphous series of stamens. 2. Pistil. 3 and 4. Sections of ovary, all slightly magnified.

UPON THE FLORA OF THE SHETLAND ISLES.

By Ralph TATE, F.G.S., F.A.S.L., ETC.,
Secretary to the Shetland Anthropological Commission.

I. INTRODUCTION. The only author who contributed to our knowledge of the plants of “Ultima Thule” was the late Mr. Thomas Edmonston, who published a “List of the Phanerogamic Plants, together with the Filices, Equisetaceæ, and Lycopodiaceæ," in the Magazine and Annals of Natural History,' p. 287 (1841). This list I have found very unsatisfactory as regards the habitats and frequency of occurrence of the species, so much at variance with my own observations, and in part with the author's own, as given in his subsequently-published • Flora,' which, coupled with several errors of determination, have induced me to put this catalogue on one side; more especially as it has been superseded by his -- Flora,' which I have employed as a basis of operations. Still, at the same time, in this very list are species mentioned which have no place in the ‘ Flora,' and are truly indigenous; these are—Galium Aparine, Myriophyllumspicatum,Salix herbacea; also, Lotus corniculatus, Empetrum nigrum, Sparganium natans, and S. simplex, mentioned only in the introduction to the Flora. Excepting the last species, I have found all the above. In addition, there are-Veronica montana, Tormentilla reptans, Lychnis vespertina, Fumaria parviflora, Ulex Europæus, Conium maculatum, Pastinaca sativa, Polygonum Bistorta, Betula alba, Briza media, Arundo Calamagrostis, Bromus arvensis, and Lycopodium clavatum. Some of these may have

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