Poetical Works of Edmund Waller

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John W. Parker, 1854 - 256 pages

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Page 220 - Go, lovely Rose ! Tell her that wastes her time and me, That now she knows, When I resemble her to thee, How sweet and fair she seems to be. Tell her that's young, And shuns to have her graces spied, That had'st thou sprung In deserts where no men abide, Thou must have uncommended died. Small is the worth Of beauty from the light retired : Bid her come forth, Suffer herself to be desired, And not blush so to be admired. Then die ! that she The common fate of all things rare May read in thee, —...
Page 121 - ON A GIRDLE. THAT which her slender waist confined Shall now my joyful temples bind : No monarch but would give his crown, His arms might do what this has done.
Page 125 - TT is not that I love you less, •*- Than when before your feet I lay; But to prevent the sad increase Of hopeless love, I keep away. In vain, alas ! for everything Which I have known belong to you, Your form does to my fancy bring, And makes my old wounds bleed anew.
Page 44 - ... floriferis ut apes in saltibus omnia libant, omnia nos itidem depascimur aurea dicta, aurea, perpetua semper dignissima vita.
Page 173 - From hence he does that antique pile behold, Where royal heads receive the sacred gold: It gives them crowns, and does their ashes keep; There made like gods, like mortals there they sleep; Making the circle of their reign complete, Those suns of empire, where they rise, they set.
Page 219 - Oh ! suppress that magic sound, Which destroys without a wound. Peace Chloris, peace, or singing die, That together you and I To Heaven may go : For all we know Of what the blessed do above Is, that they sing, and that they love.
Page 99 - Oh ! how I long my careless limbs to lay Under the plantain's shade, and all the day With amorous airs my fancy entertain, Invoke the Muses, and improve my vein! No passion there in my free breast should move, None but the sweet and best of passions, love.
Page 58 - Where'er thy navy spreads her canvas wings, Homage to thee, and peace to all she brings; The French and Spaniard, when thy flags appear, Forget their hatred, and consent to fear. So Jove from Ida did both hosts survey, And when he pleased to thunder part the fray. Ships heretofore in seas like fishes sped, The...
Page 130 - Tis art and knowledge which draw forth The hidden seeds of native worth : They blow those sparks, and make them rise Into such flames as touch the skies.
Page 192 - Poets that lasting marble seek Must carve in Latin or in Greek; We write in sand, our language grows, And, like the tide, our work o'erflows.

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