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SHAKESPEARIAN GOSSIP. By J. Parker

Norris :

Anniversary of Shakespeare's Birth

81-2

Becker, or Kesselstadt Mash

32

Bellamy, Shakespearian Dictionary of Quo-

tations

224

"Chewing the Cud”

187

Cosens, “ Castevines y Monteses” and “ Los

Bandos de Verona

30

Crotch, Double Acrostics

“Cry Aim!” “Give Aim!”

188

Dyce. New and Revised Shakespeare

Elze, “ Essays on Shakespeare”

Error in Grant White's Shakespeare

89

Facsinile of First Folio

258

Felton Portrait of Shakespeare

33, 89, 184

“Flea's Death"

Furness, New Variorum Shakespeare

33

Furness' Shakespearian Library

137

Gervinus, Shakespeare Commentaries

89

Gifford's Ben Jonson

144

Halliwell, Illustrations of Fairy Mythology

Halliwell, Ilustrations of Shakeapeare

88

Hazlitt's Shakespeare Library

224

Henry the Fourth

189

Holmes, Authorship of Shakespeare

185

Hudson, “ Text Book of Poetry"

189

Hudson, New Edition of Shakespeare

32

Increased Value of Folios

184

Ingleby, “ Centurie of Prayse”

30

Ingleby, “Still Sion "

82-5

Ingleby, Shakespeare Essays

257

Jacox, Shakespeare Diversions

King, Bacon versus Shakespeare

224

Knight's Editions of Shakespeare

188

Launce

Lumley Portrait

141

Lytles' Verses on Anthony and Cleopatra, 185

Mercade on Hamlet

Modern Stage and Shakespeare

33

Modern Slang and Americanisms in Shakes-

peare

227

Musee Phusee Glyptic

260

New Shakespeare Society

O'Carroll, “Clongoweswood Inaugural Ad-

85-6

Othello not a Negro

259

Page's Shakespeare Bust

Payne-Collier, Trilogy

86-7

Payne-Collier, Privately Printed Edition of

Shakespeare

90

ADVERTISEMENTS.

Nos.

American Bibliopolist

74-78

American Numismatic Society

73
American Journal of Education

73
Ashworth, B.
Authors' Publishing Co.

76-77

Bangs, Merwin, & Co.

Book Auction Sales

Cruikshank's Sketch Book

Gallatin Critic Co.

73-4
Graham Manufacturing Co.

73-8
Illustrated Household Magazine

76

Ben Jonson's Works

75

Journal of Numismatics

73-8

Leggo, Brothers

74

Littell's Living Age

77-8

Merriam, G. & C.

73

Metropolitan

73-6

New England Historical and Genealogical

Register

73-6

N. Y. Tribune

73-5

N. Y. Genealogical and Biographical Record 73-5

Osgood, J. R. & Co.

74

Penn Monthly

73-8

Potter's American Monthly

73

Publishers' Weekly

Rowell's Newspaper Advertising

Sabin J. & Sons

St. Nicholas Magazine

73

Scribner's Monthly

73
Shattuck, A. G.

73
South, The

73-6
Stinson, G. & Co.

73-4
Spiritual Scientist

74-7
Trent, George

76-8
Webster's Dictionaries

73

Wynne Auction sale

76

186

188

223

73-8
76-8
73-8

32, 186

dress"

222

BIBLIOPOLIST

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Literary Register and Repository of Notes

and Queries, Shakespeariana, etc. New York, FEBRUARY, 1875.

.

Vol. 1.

No. 73.

Annual Subscription :- One Dollar and Twenty-five Cents, inclusive of prepaid postage.

Single numbers, issued Bi-Monthly, Twenty-five Cents each.

This Number contains the concluding part of Miscellaneous Matterof A Hanay

Book about Books," comprising Essays : « On Typographical and Literary

Rarities," and "Cryptography;" also the first portion of the Bibliography of the same, revised by Joseph Sabin.

53-6 1-10

22

CONTENTS. AMERICAN GENEALOGY. BY CHARLES SOTHERAN, 46-51 HOWARD COLLECTION OF REMBRANDT ETCHINGS. A NOTEWORTHY LIBRARY. BY ROBERT, H. JOHNSTON, 44-6

BY WILLIAM W. SABIN, BIBLIOPHILISH: FURTHER NOTICES OF

LITERARY (AND OTHER) Jottings,

THE KARE
AND UNIQUE BOOKS IN THE LIBRARY OF Mr. E.

"O, GIVE ME A LOCK OF YOUR SILKEN HAIR,” AN

ORIGINAL PUEM,
G. ASAY, OF CHICAGO. BY DAVID GRAY,

27
56-9
Sale Of A VALUABLE COLLECTION OF AMERICANA,

34 CHAMBERS' ENCYCLOPÆDIA, Messrs. LIPPINCOTT's SHAKESPEARE MEMORIAL LIBRARY,

27 REJOINDER,

51-3 THE THOUSAND POUND Book Hoax. By J. SABIN, 34-44 Curious BOOKPLATE, 60 BANVARD AGAIN,

59 NOTES AND QUERIES:

OBITUARY:
Advice to Book Borrowers,

18 Baird ; Brockhaus; Clarke; Cornell; Fortuny; Aretino Print, by Marc Antonio Raimondi,

Hood; Jardine; Lankester; Luyster ; Moul14

trie; Phillips ; Rousseaux ; Sewell; Tischendorf: "As Sound as a Roache,"

19
Warren :

21-27 Bibliographia Stenographica,

15

OUR LIBRARY TABLE:
Bookbinding; Engravings; Chaucer Quotations,

Bernard, Life of Lover,

Hotten, Lists of American Emigrants,
etc.,
12-13

19 Bosh,

19
Molony, Magic Mirror and other Poems,

21 Bugby, or Bugbee Family,

O'Neill, First Japanese Book, -
18
Queyroy, Heures Romaines,

20 Defender of the Faith,

16
Thackerayana,

23 "God Save the Mark," etc.,

18 White's History of Selborne, Edited by Harting, 23 Great Egyptian Medical Papyrus,

13

SHAKESPEARIAN GOSSIP, BY J. PARKER NORRIS: Literary Productions of the Bonaparte Family,

A Flea's Death,

34 Becker, or Kesselstadt Mask,

32 Motley's Life of John of Barneveld, and Gaspar

Cosens, “ Castelvines y Monteses and "Les Bon-
Scioppius,

18
dos de Verona,"

30 Parallel Passages,

15
Dyce, New and Revised Shakespeare,

31 Paul Jones's Action,

15
Elze, " Essays on Shakespeare,

28 Rosalie, or Rose Poe,

18
Felton Portrait of Shakespeare,

33 Sacred Lotus,

Furness, New Variorum Shakespeare,

33 " Taking a Sight,"

19

Halliwell, ** Illustrations of Fairy Mythology," 31 * The Ships Sail Out,"

18
Hudson, New Edition of Shakespeare,

32
Calf
" Levant" Morocco, * Crushed
Ingleby, “Centurie of Prayse."

30 Morocco, 19 Modern Stage and Shakespeare,

33 Two Monuments to the Memory of Gustavus

New Shakespeare Society,

32 Adolphus,

Russell, * Criticism of Mř. Irving's Hamlet,".

33

20

11

.

IT

* Tree

12

REMIT FOR 1875.–Subscribers wbo desire a continuance of the BIBLIOPOLIST will kindly favor the publishers by remitting $1.25, the amount of the subscription for the forthcoming year, including postage, payable in advance. They call attention to this, it being, as a rule, their only means of learning whether a continuance of the magazine is wished for. NEARLY READY.--THE AMERICAN BIBLIOPOLIST, Vol. 6, 8vo, cloth, uncut edges, $2.00. The Title

and Index to the Sixth Volume can be had separately--price, 25 cents. The publishers can supply the former volumes of the Bibliopolist, in cloth, as follows : Vol. I, $4.25; Vol. II, $1.75; Vol. III, $3.00; Vol. IV, $3.00; Vol. V, $2.00.

J. SABIN & SONS, 84 Nassau St., New York, and

14 York St., Covent Garden, London, W. C.

TO ADVERTISERS AND PUBLISHERS .

THE AMERICAN BIBLIOPOLIST,

A Literary Register and Repository of Notes and Queries, Shakespeariana, etc.
ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION, $1.25, INCLUSIVE OF PRE-PAID POSTAGE. SINGLE NOMBERS 25

CENTS EACH.
Published Bi-Monthly on the first day of February, April, Jure, August, October and December.

AN ADMIRABLE ADVERTISING MEDIUM. Advertisements are solicited for the “ AMERICAN BIBLIOPOLISr.” This magazine, which has a circulation of some two or three thousand, is the only one in the United States which has succESSFULLY occupied, dur. ing the last six years, the place of Notes AND QUERIES and other British Periodicals of the same genus, and offers ESPECIAL INDUCEMENTS as an advertising medium, not only on account of its coming into the HANDS OF THE BOOK BUYER, but of its diffusion among LIBRARIES, READING Rooms, etc., and READERS OF THE INTELLEC

TUAL CLASS GENERALLY.

year the

Attention is particularly called to the criticisms of the press, which speak well as to the position occupied by the AMERICAN Bibliopolist. It cannot be characterized as of a mere ephemeral nature, for it is used as a continual book of REFERENCE during the period of publication; and at the end of the separate numbers are bound up in volumes, in which the advertisements are carefully preserved. Complete sets of the AMERICAN BIBLIOPOLIST are now worth THREE TIMES the original published price. The volume for 1875, will make the seventh. The price of advertising is as follows : Page,

$16.00
Hal, page,

9.00
Quarter page,
Eighth page,

3.00 Special arrangements are made for the insertion of separate slip pages and continuous advertisements.

5.00

CRITIQUES OF THE PRESS. The AMERICAN BIBLIOPOLIST, in its present improved form, every man with a literary taste will thoroughly enjoy. It is well edited, and has always a rich collection of bibliomaniacal items.- Louisville Courier-Journal, Dec. 26-27, 74.

The July and August number of the AMERICAN BIBLIOPOLIST is out, and contains the fourth installment of the “ Handy Book about Books," with much antiquarian lore and literary gossip, such as an account of the origin of the names of States, etc.-Publishers' Weekly, 1874.

The AMERICAN BIBLIOPOLIST is invaluable to those who wish to be kept acquainted with events of permanent interest in the library world, and particularly to those who are interested in the curiosities of literature.-N. Y. Methodist,

The BIBLIOPOLIST is admirably edited, I suppose by “our senior," leained in bibliography. Thank you for all that you sent me.-

The AMERICAN BIBLIOPOLIST, in addition to a great variety of interesting literary announcements, abounds with billiographical and antiquarian details, which cannot fail to gratify the curiosity of the patient book worm.-N. Y. Tribune,

J. Sabin & Sons have brought their AMERICAN BIBLIOPOLIst to a point of great interest, as a “ Repository of Notes and Queries" ; and every lover of curious inquiries into the origin of words, customs, etc.-in short all antiquities of a literary character or bearing-ought to possess this ingenious and useful magazine.- Christian Union.

This publication, though nominally addressed to book-buyers, furnishes a large amount of curious and entertaining information for all lovers of literature. It is not the mouthpiece of any set, and its criticisms of catalogues and books are refreshingly independent and piquant - Nation.

A Register of the Progress of Literature, which enjoys a wide popularity for the spice and vinegar which season its pages.-Evening Telegram.

The AMERICAN BIBLIOPOLIST is the only real“ Literary Register" issued in this country. In addition to its valuable lists of rare old books, and its catalogues of new ones, the BiblioPoLIst contains monthly corre: pondence on all sorts of literary subjects, and from all quarters. A most interesting and important feature of this work is in its department of

Notes and Queries," in which curious words, old traditions, ancient customs, and other subjects in which antiquaries delight, are discussed by correspondents among themselves.--School Journal.

The Department entitled “ Notes andl Queries," of the AMERICAN BINLIOPOLIst is a repository for all sorts of out of the way, and at the same time interesting literary information - College Courant.

To a man or woman engaged in literary pursuits, such a work as this is simply invaluable, combining, as it does, the features of the London " Notes and Queries" with a complete catalogue of the works issued from the British and Ameri: can Press during the month. It is printed on fine toned paper, and is just the work to gladden the heart of the book. jover.- Brooklyn Times.

No Bibliopole should neglect to subscribe to this publication; its interest and value to him is almost inestimable. It gives notice of some of the most noticeable new books, literary gossip, some curious “notes and queries," interesting correspondence on a variety of topics, and some valuable articles on subjects relating to literature.- Philadelphia Inquirer.

The BIBLIOPOLIST is undoubtedly the most interesting and worth preserving literary record within our knowledge. - Boston Pilot.

Sabin's BIBLIOPOLIST contains its usual literary feast of notes and queries, and some interesting correspondence. -Jewish Messenger.

J. SABIN & SONS, Publishers, 84 Nassau St., New York,

14 York St., Covent Garden, London, W. C.

THE AMERICAN BIBLIOPOLIST,

A Literary Register and Repository of Notes and

Queries, Shakespeariana, etc. “What was scattered in many volumes, and observed at several times by eye-witnesses, with no cursory pains I laid

legether to save the reader a far longer travail of wandering through so many deserted authors. Risuch as it is, was thought by some who knew of it, not amiss to be published ; that so many things remarkable, dispersed

before, n ow brought under one view, might not hazard to be otherwise lost, nor the labor lost of collecting them.”Milton, Preface to: Brief History of Moscovia," 1632.

* The essay,

Vol. VII.

NEW YORK, FEBRUARY, 1875.

No. 73.

sale (comprising only 275 lots) brought 2,4141. ros, 6d.

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LITERARY (AND OTHER) JOTTINGS.

On Dec. 1, 1874, Messrs. Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge, of London, sold, at their rooms, the library of a well-known foreign collector. We quote the following items, with the prices realized : Augustinus de Civitate Dei, che second book printed in Italy at the Monastery of Soubiaco, 311. 1os.; Breviaire Nostre Dame, printed in 1587 at Paris, from the library of Henry the Third, with his devices and motto on the binding of N. Eve, 271. 105. ; Casa de Potentium ac Tenuium inter se Officiis, manuscript ón vellum, in a curious perforated binding by N. Eve, with the arms of Henry the Second and the devices of his famous mistress, the beautiful Diane de Poictiers, 377; The Household expenses of the same Diane de Poictiers, “pour Souppers," in August, 1565, with her autograph signature, 201.; Grolier's copy of Gayleri Navicula, with his name and motto, 30!.; Evangelia, a specimen of P. Seguier's library, 201. 105.; Gratiani Decreta, manuscript of the thirteenth cencury, on vellum, with twenty-eight miniatures in the early Saxon style, 491. 1os. ; Heures a l'usage de Rome, printed on vellum, in 1496, by Pigouchet, 751.; Horæ in Laudem B. Virginis, Tory's first edition, 481. 1os.; Manuscript Horæ, on vellum, with illuminations, 46!. and 50l.; First Edi. tion of La Fontaine's Fables, 231.; Oudry's Edition of the same, on large paper, 421. 105.; His Contes, in the edition of the fermiers Généraux, 301. 105.; The Heptameron of Marguerite de Navarre, with

Freudenberger's plates, 321. nos. ; a beautiful Offi* cium B. Virginis Secundum Ordinem Humiliatorum,

written on vellum by an Italian scribe, with miniatures, 1021. ; an Officium B Virginis, written on vellum, for the private use of Henry the Fourth, by C Ruffin, 471.; an Office de la Vierge, dedicated to the Queen of France by the Jesuit Coton, and bound

for her by Le Gascon, 251.; The first Aldine the Poliphilo, 331.; Royaumont Histoire de la Bible,

+3!.; Senecæ Opera, first edition, 32). 10s.; Thevet, Singularicez de la France Antarctique, 251.; an elerant Manuscript on vellum, containing

« Prieres Saintes et Chretiennes pour Monseigneur," written * by the famous caligrapher, Gilbert, so well known as

the only book Louis the Sixteenth was allowed to retain whilst in prison, and which he gave to his gaoler, Vincent, a gift that proved fatal to the latter, is it caused him to be guillotined as a suspected Royalist, 821.; The Elzevir Corneille, 411. The entire

The sale of the library of the late John Gough Nichols, F. S. A., was concluded on Saturday, Dec. 12, by Messrs. Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge, at their house in Wellington street, producing in the aggregate 2,1951. 1os. 6d. It comprised topographical works and illustrations of the various counties, heraldry, family history, pedigrees, seals, autograph letters, and some curious deeds--in all, 2860 lots. The following are from among the different sections : Duke of Beaufort's Progress through Wales in 1684, 151. 1os.; Collection of original assignments of, and agreements for, manuscript, between celebrated authors, in 3 vols., 531. 10s.; Bridges's History and Antiquities of Northamptonshire, with manuscript and other additions, 4 vols. in 2, 141.; Carlos's Collections for the History of English Counties, autograph MS., 5 vols., 121, 10s; Dallaway's History of the Western Division of the County of Sussex, 3 vols., 576. 1os. ; Fraser's Memoirs of the Maxwells of Pollok, 2 vols., 121. 155.; Collections for the County of Cambridge, by Smyth, 201. 1os. ; Carter's Collection of Sketches relating to the Antiquity of this Kingdom, original drawings, wul.; Gough's Tours of England, Wales, and Scotland, illustrated, 10l. 10s.; Gurney's Record of the House of Gournay, printed for private circulation, 136. 1os.; Gough's History of Enfield, autograph MS., 91.; Harris's History of South Wiltshire, 6 vols., 281.; Nichols's (J. B.) Obituary of Literary and Eminent Persons from 1701 to 1858, autograph MS., 261. 105.; Noble's Biographical Anecdotes, 11 vols., autograph MS., 311.; Ogilvie's Account of the Anglo-Norman Families who settled in England, MS., 151.; Rowland's Account of the Nevill Family, 121.; Whitaker's Parish of Whalley, 141. 1os.; Deanery of Craven, 121. 55.; Willement's Arms, Banners, and Standards of the Royal Family and Nobility in the time of Henry the Eighth, MS., with drawings, 131.; Collection of Rubbings from Sepulchral and other Brasses, 221. 1os.; Collection of Brass, Iron, and other Seals, 151. 155.; Seal found near Durham, and others, 121.

Mr. Chapman, of Edinburgh, completed the other day the sale of the library of the late Prof. Stevenson, which lasied for a period of fourteen days. Among the books sold was a fine set of the Bannatyne Club books, which brought 2041. 155.

A copy of the

Bollandist Lives of the Saints brought 761. 135.; Dugdale's Monasticon Anglicanum, 401. Many of the books were purchased for the Free Library about to be instituted in Glasgow, and we understand that the entire library of the late Prof. Cosmo Innes, which was rich in antiquarian and historical works, has been purchased for the same institution.

Old New York History.—Mr. F. B. Patterson, of 32 Cedar street, N. Y., announces for publication during the year a “ Panoramic History of Old New York," consisting of fac-similes of early maps, old advertisements, views of builaings, portraits of old New Yorkers, etc., etc. He will also publish shortly a volume of poems by George A. Baker, Jr., known to the public by his “ Vers-de-Société " which have appeared from time to time in Scribner's Magazine and the (N. Y.) Evening Mail.

The late Charles Knight, it appears, left a sketch of an historical novel, which has since been worked up and is just published in England as a “ Romance of Acadia." It is one which ought to repay reprinting here, inasmuch as the scene is laid on this continent, and the principal characters, though French, had curious relations with the confederated New England provinces. The heroine is Madame de la Tour, wife of Charles, the son of Claude de la Tour, two adventurers of remarkable versatility, who were, as has been said, “ always French or English accord. ing to circumstances." No writer of fiction ever conceived a more truly romantic story than that which Charlevoix was the first to tell concerning the founder of Fort la Tour, at the mouth of the river St. John, the stronghold which his intrepid wife had twice defended successfully against Charles de Menou d'Aulnay-Charnisé. Haliburton, in his “ History of Nova Scotia," says that after the suurrender which followed the second defence (1647), D'Aulnay made Madame la Tour witness, with a rope around her neck, the execution of her little garrison, and so hastenej her death, which occurred shortly afterwards. Palfrey (“ History of New England ") suggests that Haliburton misread the older authorities, and that no such brutality was enacted. As La Tour, a few years later, married the widow of D'Aulnay, it is charitable to suppose that his grudges against his former rival were mainly political, though his nice sense of honor, displayed towards his father, when the latter in 1630 urged him to an act of disloyalty, soon oozed away under the necessity of holding his own in Acadia ; and already before his second nuptials he had “ turned pirate," as Winthrop says, with a Massachusetts vessel entrusted to him. D'Aulnay's character, on the other hand, has been upheld in “ Preuves de l'Histoire de la Maison de Menou" (Paris, 1852, translated in the “ Massachusetts Historical Society's Collections,” Vol. IV., fourth series, p. 462); and still more recently in M. Moreau's History of French Acadia," from 1518 to 1755 (Paris, 1873). M. Moreau dwells particularly on the administration of D'Aulnay, deriving his facts from some unpublished family documents entrusted to him by a descendant.

There are well-known and often-quoted passages in Swift, Macaulay, Thackeray, and many other authors about the position of clergymen in England a

hundred and fifty years ago.

A curious illustration occurs in one of the Winchilsea papers, recently acquired by the British Museum, but not yet calendered or bound. A letter dated the 3d of November, 1729, from Mr. John Wilkinson to a noble duke, or possibly to the archbishop, but the name does not come out, contains the following passage :

Howsoever some people may sink beneath their characters by reporting things entirely false and groundless, I cannot say : but, my Lord, I cou'd not be easy untill I had solemnly assured your Grace that the late Earl of Winchilsea gave me the Presentaons, in every Respect truly greatfand noble; and that a Wife was never whispered to me till the day after my Lord's death: then indeed my Lady Herself told me that Her maid Morffee was always intended to go along with the Livings, and that if I desired to make Her Ladysp. my Friend, I must not refuse the Offer : I own, my Lord, that I was at first unable to give a direct answer, but recovering the surprise, I gave Her Ladysp. an absolute denial, upon which She in a Passion ordered me to withdraw, and I have never seen Her Ladysp. since." He goes on to expla that the livings had been five months vacant, and that Lord Winchilsea appointed him just before his death as a reward for his attendance ; that no condition was ever mentioned ; and that he was not the person first “pick'd upon." A certain John Wilkinson, M. A., is mentioned by Hasted as having been appointed rector of Eastwell on the 26th of May, 1730.

He resigned in 1733. The maxims of the ancient Egyptians for their young are equally good for our youth of modern times, and favorably contrast with those of Christianity. We will quote a few of them: “Do not take airs." “ Do not maltreat an inferior." Respect the aged." “ Do not save thy life at the expense of another."

“Do not make sport of those dependent upon thee." “ Do not pervert the heart of thy comrade if it be pure.” “Let not riches make thee proud, for the first author of these good things is God.”

on

The Grosvenor Library of Buffalo, N. Y., has been fortunate in securing for its librarian the services of Mr. James W. Ward, formerly of this city. Mr. Ward is a gentleman of much general culture, and under his care we have no doubt the library will become one of the best of its kind in the United States.

The high value of certain book rarities is shown by the following anecdote : Signor Dura, a bookseller at Naples, put forth a catalogue, in which was the following highly tempting entry, under the head Vespucci: «Lettera di Amerigo Vespucci delle isole nuouamente troute in quattro suoi viaggi," sixteen leaves, with woodcuts, supposed to have been printed in the year 1516. The price of this little work was put at 2,000 lire, equal to £80 sterling-not too dear, say the booksellers, considering that the only other copy known is in the Granville Library, British Museum. Copies of this catalogue reached Paris on Sunday, Nov. 29th, 1874, and on the same day Signor Dura received as many as four telegrams from different persons at Paris, signifying their desire to purchase the work. On the next day, Monday, the catalogues reached London, and then three different persons telegraphed their desire to purchase, but, alas, too late, A Paris bookseller was the first in the field, and had secured the prize.

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