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The library has recently purchased one of the fifty sets of the “Woolley Photographs,” comprising 500 plates mounted on cardboard, with descriptive letterpress, arranged in five boxes; also a set of the collotypes issued by the Oxford University Press for the Type Facsimile Society, comprising about 236 plates, and representing the issues for 1900-1905. These two series give in exact facsimile specimens of fifteenth-century typographical monuments, and furnish important material for the study of early typography.

ADMIRAL LESTOCK AND GENERAL ST. CLAIR, RELATING

TO THE EXPEDITION AGAINST L'ORIENT IN 1746.

Selections from contemporary transcripts in the New York Public Library.

EXTRACT OF A LETTER FROM CHARLES KNOWLES ESQR. GOVERNOR OF LOUISBOURG TO CHARLES CORBET ESQR. SECRETARY OF THE ADMIRALTY.

JULY 5TH 1746 It was very lucky no more Troops came with me, than the three Companies of Framptons Regiment, as it was near three weeks before we cou'd land them, most of the houses in Town haveing been pull'd down and burnt by the New England Troops last Winter, and not one of those left standing, but what wanted repairs. I am sorry to tell their Lordships, that in general it is the most miserable ruinous place I ever beheld.

The Barracks were also supply'd by Contract so as an entire Set of Bedding and Barrack Utensils will be necessary for such a number of Troops as His Majesty may think proper to keep here, one of the Ships being lost, which had the greatest part of the bedding on board, and that which arriv'd being damag'd and spoilt.

There are no Windmills or Watermills in or about the place, nor any Handmills in Store.

The French Staff officers of the Garrison, and the Civil Branch of their ordnance had yearly allowance for Lodgeings according to their Rank and Offices; but so many Houses being pull'd down, there will now want proper Lodgeings to be built for our Staff officers.

The French Garrison of this place consisted of about 6 or 700 men; the rest were Inhabitants who muster'd for Duty about 1400 men, besides those they might call in from the countrey ; These lodg'd in town either in their own Houses, or in Quarters; The Regular Troops were lodg'd in the Citadel Barracks. The Garrison now here consists of about 2500 men; and upon the best calculation all the Barracks and Houses, which are left standing will not conveniently lodge 18 or 1900 men; so that there is a necessity of erecting the propos'd Barracks as fast as possible, as well for the Conveniency of the Troops here at present (who are excessively crowded) as for the others, who are expected from England, and to clear the Hospital which has been turned into a Barrack.

The Town in general has been badly built, and was in a most ruinous Condition; and by the Garrisons wanting Fewel last Year a great number of Houses and Inclosures were pull'd down; and those left standing, we are not only oblig'd to repair, but half build up to make quarters for lodgeing the officers and Soldiers, and all the Work-men we can possibly get, both from the Regiments here and from New England, are not sufficient to carry on the present immediate repairs.

GENERAL St. Clair's LETTER TO THE DUKE OF New CASTLE.

ON BOARD THE SUPERBE,

AUGUST 13TH, 1746 MY LORD,

Since I had last the Honour to write to your Grace, Mr. Lestock has been so oblidgeing as to communicate to me, the Extract of a Letter dated the 5th of July, from Commodore Knowles to the Board of Admiralty, by which I learn the ruinous Condition of the Town of Louisbourg, and the difficulties, which the Troops will probably labour under, with regard to Lodgeings, Fireing, and fresh provisions on their Arrival there. This My Lord, I reckon was not imagin'd by the Administration when the Instructions were last drawn, directing me to sail first to Louisbourg, and there to concert the proper Measures for the best disposition of Winter quarters for the troops entrusted to my Command. Nor could it at that time be foreseen, that we should unhappily meet with these contrary Winds, which have so long detain'd us here. But now when the Condition of the Town of Louisbourg is throughly known, and the Season is so far advanc'd that there is a possibility of the setting in of the North West wind, by the time that we arrive in that North Latitude, I flatter myself you will easily pardon my takeing the liberty of reminding your Grace, that there will be a good deal of time unnecessarily consum'd in attempting to sail to Louisbourg, which, 'tis much doubted if we can reach with the whole Fleet of Transports, and where, if we arrive, ’twill be impossible to have any part of the Forces accomodated with Winter quarters: Since we must afterwards proceed for that purpose to some other of His Majestie's Colonies in North America. This My Lord, I have ventur'd to suggest to your Grace presumeing, that tis not improbable His Majesty may be pleas'd to make some Alterations, in the Admirals Instructions and mine, and order us to sail directly to New England, New York or some other of the more Southern Colonies, by which means, the passage for the Troops, may be render'd more safe and easy and all the other Inconveniences, apprehended from proceeding to Louisbourg will be avoided; And the Army kept in such a good Condition as to be fit to execute any plan of Military operation, which His Majesty may be pleas’d to send us from Brittain or which may be resolv'd on by the Council, appointed by the Instructions; either of which shall be conducted, in the most careful and expeditious manner possible by him who has the Honour to be &ca.

I. ST. CLAIR. To His Grace The Duke of New Castle.

THE DUKE OF Newcastle's JOINT LETTER TO ADMIRAL LESTOCK AND Gen't St. CLAIR IN ANSWER TO THEIR JOINT LETTER OF AUGUST 23D.

WHITEHALL AUGUST 26TH 1746 GENTLEMEN

I receiv'd late on Saturday night your Letter of that Date and laid it before the King

His Majesty finding by your former letters that it would be impracticable for you to proceed this Season with the Squadron and Troops under your Command further than Boston, and being desirous that they shou'd be employ'd at present, in such manner as shou'd be most for His Majesty's Service, and consistent with The King's intention of sending them to North-America, as early in the Spring, as the navigation, in those Seas will permit. The King has commanded me to acquaint you with his Pleasure, that you shou'd forth with sail with all the Ships and Transports that are design'd for North America, either to Port L'Orient, or to Rochefort, or to Rochelle, and endeavour to make Yourselves Masters of such of them, as You shall think it most adviseable to attempt, and if you should succeed in getting possession of any of those places, You will make such further Motions in the Countrey, and undertake such operations as you shall think most likely to alarm and annoy the French, and thereby procure a Diversion in Flanders, which is one great End of the Expedition.

And if you shall have Information, that any number of Protestants in those parts are dispos'd to take up arms, and put themselves under your protection, You are to give them whatever assistance shall be in your Power

If upon your arrival, at Port L'Orient, Rochfort or Rochelle, you should find that those places are too strong to be attempted with any probability of Success, it is then His Majesty's pleasure that you shou'd proceed to any other Port or Place on the Western Coast of France, where you may have Information, or shall yourselves be of opinion that it may be practicable to make an attempt with any probability of Success and where the Navigation may not be too hazardous for the Ships and Transports; and you are there to land the Troops, lay the Countrey under Contribution, and annoy the Enemy in the best Manner you are able, in order to procure the Diversion above mention'd

If it should please God to grant you such Success, that you should be able to establish yourselves in any part of the Coast His Majesty will then order you a further Reinforcement of Troops to be forthwith sent from hence.

As the view and Design in this Expedition, is to procure if possible a Diversion in Flanders, from the Danger the French may apprehend for that part of their Coast, when they see such a considerable number of Ships and Troops upon it. His Majesty leaves it to you to act in such manner as you shall think the most proper for that Purpose, provided those places mention'd in the former part of this Letter are found too strong to be attack'd.

I mention'd to you in my former Letter, the going up the River Bourdeaux, in order to make an Attempt there: His Majesty is inclin’d to think, that such a force of Ships and Troops, with such ordnance Stores must create great Alarm in France, and consequently oblidge them to send a considerable force to oppose them.

If you should find it practicable to burn any of The French Men of War or Merchant Ships in any of their ports, His Majesty doubts not but you will indeavour to do it.

It is His Majesty's pleasure, that you shou'd sail as soon as ever the Wind is fair, the Success of such an expedition depending entirely upon the Secrecy and Suprise of it; And it is The Kings positive Command, that you shou'd not impart it to any one person, one moment sooner than is absolutely necessary for the Execution of it.

If after your arrival upon the Western Coast of France, and the best Intelligence you can get of the Situation and Strength of the Ports and Places there, you shou'd find it impracticable to make use of the Forces under your Command, on any part of that Coast, so as to answer the end and view of sending you thither, It is then His Majesty's pleasure, that the Transports with all the Troops, shou'd proceed under a proper Convoy to Cork and Kinsale, and that the Troops shou'd be disembark'd there and remain till the Season of the Year shall make it practicable to send them to North America; And You Admiral Lestock are in that Case to send a proper Convoy with the Transports to Cork and Kinsale, and to return yourself with the Squadron to Spithead.

You Admiral Lestock will endeavour to provide yourself with such Pilots as you may want, in the most Secret manner possible.

His Majesty will expect to have an Account of your Proceedings, by every occasion that offers; and I hope soon to hear, that you are sail'd on your Expedition, in which I heartily wish you good Success, And am

Gentlemen, etc.

HOLLES NEWCASTLE. To Adm'l Lestock and Lt. Genl. St. Clair.

ADMIRAL LESTOCK'S AND GENERAL St. Clair's JOINT LETTER TO THE DUKE OF

NEWCASTLE IN ANSWER TO His GRACE'S OF SEPTEMB. THE IITH.

ON BOARD THE PRINCESSA

IN PLYMOUTH SOUND SEPTR. 15TH 1746 My LORD

We were Honour'd with His Majesty's Commands, by Your Grace's Letter of the 11th Inst., which we receiv'd late on Saturday night.

Since our last to Your Grace of the 9th, the Wind has been contrary, with a great Sea and a thick Fog, till Saturday morning when the Admiral made the Signal to unmoor, and accordingly employ'd all the boats in the Squadron with a Lieut. in each, and two Captains to superintend the whole in order to get the Transports and Storeships out from Cat Water, where they had shelter'd themselves from the late bad weather, since which there has not been an opportunity to get any of them out

And we have the pleasure to assure Your Grace, that by the extraordinary dilligence and great fatigue all day and night in the officers and Men, sent on this important Duty the Transports and Storeships were all got out into the Sound ready for sailing, and had it not been calm yesterday forenoon, till the Sea breeze came in at South west, which continued all day, whereby we were prevented from sailing, we shou'd enjoy'd a day sooner the infinite Satisfaction of dispatching Your Graces Messenger with the news that we were put to Sea, in order to proceed in our Design on Port L'orient, pursuant to the Kings last Orders as the most

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