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WILLIAM W. APPLETON.

ALEXANDER MAITLAND. JOHN BIGELOW.

J. PIERPONT MORGAN. JOHN L. CADWALADER.

MORGAN J. O'BRIEN. ANDREW CARNEGIE,

STEPHEN H. OLIN. CLEVELAND H. DODGE.

ALEXANDER E. ORR. JOHN MURPHY FARLEY.

HENRY C. POTTER. SAMUEL GREENBAUM.

GEORGE L. RIVES. H. VAN RENSSELAER KENNEDY.

CHARLES HOWLAND RUSSELL. JOHN S. KENNEDY.

PHILIP SCHUYLER. EDWARD King.

GEORGE W. SMITH.
LEWIS Cass LEDYARD,

FREDERICK STURGES.
GEORGE BRINTON MCCLELLAN, Mayor of the City of New York, ex officio.
HERMAN A. METZ, Comptroller of the City of New York, ex officio.
PATRICK F. McGowan, President of the Board of Aldermen, ex officio.

OFFICERS

President, Hon. John Bigelow, LL.D.
First Vice-President, Rt. Rev. HENRY C. POTTER, D.D. LL.D.
Second Vice-President, John S. KENNEDY, Esq.
Secretary, CHARLES HOWLAND Russell, Esq., 425 Lafayette Street.
Treasurer, EDWARD KING, Esq., Union Trust Company, 8o Broadway.
Director, Dr. JOHN S. BILLINGS, 425 Lafayette Street.

BRANCHES-REFERENCE Lafayette Street, 425. (Astor.)

Fifth Avenue, 890. (LENOX.)

CIRCULATION

MANHATTAN. East Broadway, 31. (CHATHAM SQUARE.) EAST BROADWAY, 197. (Educational Alliance Building.) RIVINGTON STREET, 61-63. Le Roy Street, 66. (HUDSON PARK.) BOND STREET, 49. Near the Bowery. 8th Street. 135 Second Avenue. (OTTENDORFER.) Toth Street, 331 East. (TOMPKINS SQUARE.) 13th Street, 251 West. Near 8th Avenue. (JACKSON SQUARE.) 22d Street, 230 East. Near 2d Avenue. (EPIPHANY.) 23d Street, 209 West. Near 7th Avenue. (MUHLENBERG.) 34th STREET, 215 East. Between 2d and 3d Avenues. 40th Street, 501 West. Between roth and 11th Avenues. (ST. RAPHAEL's.) 42d Street, 226 West. Near 7th Avenue. (GEORGE BRUCE. Department Headquarters.) 50th Street, 123 East. Near Lexington Avenue. (CATHEDRAL.) 51st Street, 463 West. Near 10th Avenue. (SACRED HEART.) 59th STREET, 113 East. Near Lexington Avenue. 67th STREET, 328 East. Near ist Avenue. 69th Street. 190 Amsterdam Avenue. (RIVERSIDE. TRAVELLING LIBRARIES.) 76th Street, 538 East. (WEBSTER.) 79th Street, 222–224 East. Near 3d Avenue. (YORKVILLE.) 81st Street. 444 Amsterdam Avenue. (BLIND LIBRARY.) 82d Street. 2279 Broadway. (St. AGNES.) 86th STREET. 536 Amsterdam Avenue. 96th Street, 112 East. Between Lexington and Park Avenues. iooth Street, 206 West. Near Broadway. (BLOOMINGDALE.) 110th Street, 174 East. Near 3d Avenue. (AGUILAR.) 123d Street, 32 West. (HARLEM LIBRARY BRANCH.) 125th STREET, 224 East. Near 3d Avenue. 135th STREET, 103 West. 156th Street, 922 St. Nicholas Avenue. (WASHINGTON Heights.)

BRONX, 140th Street, 569 East, cor. Alexander Avenue. (Mort Haven.) 176th Street. 1866 Washington Avenue. (TREMONT.) 230th Street. 2933 Kingsbridge Avenue. (KINGSBRIDGE.)

RICHMOND. TOTTENVILLE. Amboy Road, near Prospect Avenue. Port RICHMOND. 12 Bennett Street.

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REFERENCE DEPARTMENT, During the month of February there were received at the Library, by purchase, 717 volumes and 298 pamphlets ; by gift, 1,046 volumes and 2,810 pamphlets ; and by exchange, 67 volumes and 6,356 pamphlets, making a total of 1,830 volumes and 9,464 pamphlets.

There were catalogued 2,883 volumes and 3,129 pamphlets; the number of cards written was 8,662 and of slips for the copying machine 2,594; from the latter were received 12,962 cards.

The following table shows the number of readers, and the number of volumes consulted, in both the Astor and Lenox Branches of the Library, also the number of visitors to the Print Exhibition at the Lenox during the month :

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CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT. The most popular books of the month were (in non-fiction): London's “War of the Classes,” Hunter's “Poverty,” Shaw's “Plays Pleasant and Unpleasant"; (adult fiction): Wharton's “House of Mirth," Glasgow's “Wheel of Life," Jacobs' “Captains All”; (juvenile fiction): Barbour's “Behind the Line," Rhoades' “ Little Girl Next Door,” Burnett's “ Little Princess."

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MANHATTAN, East Broadway, 33... East Broadway, 197. Rivington Street, 61. Le Roy Street, 66.. Bond Street, 49... 8th Street. 135 Second Ave.. Toth Street, 331 East...... 13th Street, 251 West.. 22d Street, 230 East.. 23d Street, 130 West.... 34th Street, 215 East. 40th Street, 501 West.. 42d Street, 226 West... 50th Street, 123 East. ..... 51st Street, 463 West... 59th Street, 113 East. 67th Street, 328 East.. 69th Street. 190 Amsterdam Ave.....

Travelling Libraries... 76th Street, 538 East... 79th Street, 222 East... 82d Street. 2279 Broadway.... 86th Street. 536 Amsterdam Ave.... g1st Street, 121 West..... 96th Street, 112 East. Tooth Street, 206 West.... 110th Street, 174 East..... 123d Street, 32 West... 125th Street, 224 East.... 135th Street, 103 West.... 156th Street. 922 St. Nicholas Ave...

12,387 4,636 6,651 10,344 10,998 12,834 47,434

6,459 20,328 9,379

1,262

640

370 4,064 1,168 1,084

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491 3.540 3,906 5, 220

95 330 275 382

509 1,261

389 353 982 228

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8,755

1,279

1,687

773

5

44

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BRONX. 140th Street and Alexander Ave...... 176th Street and Washington Ave... Kingsbridge Ave., 2933. .

20,235
16,616

914

274 1,874

1,024

823

3,173
1,945

330 160

310

2,132

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42,491

77,428

12,796

Important gifts of the month were: From the Architectural Record Company, a copy of Sweets' indexed catalogue of building construction, 1906; from the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, “Catalogue des gravures contemporaines formant la collection Ardail, par Georges Riat,” 1904; from William K. Bixby, a privately printed volume of "Letters from George Washington to Tobias Lear, with an appendix containing miscellaneous Washington letters and documents reprinted from the originals in the collection of Mr. William K. Bixby of St. Louis," Rochester, N. Y., 1905; from Charles W. Bump, “Down the historic Susquehanna, a summer's jaunt from Otsego to the Chesapeake, by C. W. Bump,” Baltimore, 1899, and "London plays of 1901, an American critic's summary and review of the season,” Baltimore, 1901, a volume of newspaper clippings made up into book form; from Mrs. William Allen Butler, 42 copies of the poems of William Allen Butler; from Joseph H. Choate, 282 volumes and 671 pamphlets, a miscellaneous collection of English and American publications, documents, etc.; from the Chief Engineer, Columbus, Ohio, 4 volumes and 9 pamphlets, relating to water supply and sewage disposal; from James S. Cushing, a copy of his Genealogy of the Cushing family, Montreal, 1905 ; from Charles Stewart Davison, "Daniel Boone, contribution toward a bibliography of writings concerning Daniel Boone, by William Harvey Miner," New York, published by the Dibdin Club, 1901 ; from Sir James Dewar, 10 pamphlets relating to his work in physics and physical chemistry; from the Friends' Book and Tract Committee, New York, 14 volumes of works by and relating to the Society of Friends; from B. Frank Green, his Gordon Genealogy, in manuscript; from Charles R. Knapp, his Knapp genealogy, 1905; from the Prince of Monaco, through the Musée Océanographique de Monaco, 30 volumes, 56 pamphlets, and 5 maps, the important oceanographic work entitled “Résultats des campagnes scientifiques, accomplies sur son yacht par le Prince Albert 1er Prince de Monaco, publié sous sa direction avec le concours du Baron Jules de Guerne,” Monaco, 1889-1905; from Feliks Piotrowski, “Opis ciata ludzkiego czyli antropografia,” Warsaw, 1906; from the Statistical office of Rosario de Santa Fé, Argentine Republic, the "Anuario estadistico de la ciudad," 1904; from the Royal Society of St. George, London, three of its publications; from the U. S. S. Pennsylvania its monthly paper “The Liberty Bell Magazine” and from the U. S. S. Kentucky its paper the "Kentucky Budget."

At the LENOX Branch the exhibition of manuscripts, books and portraits relating to Benjamin Franklin was continued. At the Astor Branch plates from a collection of reproductions of the works of Quentin Matsijs and “Handzeichnungen, Stiche und Gemälde von Lucas van Leyden” and from “L’Estampe Moderne" were exhibited, and the permanent exhibition of photographs of branch libraries was enlarged.

At the MUHLENBERG branch plates from a set of photographic reproductions of paintings in the Dresden Gallery were placed on exhibition. Other exhibitions from the print room shown in the circulation branches remain as before.

Picture bulletins and temporary collections of books on special shelves at the circulation branches were as follows:

CHATHAM SQUARE, Animals, Nathan Hale; EAST BROADWAY, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Victor Hugo; RIVINGTON STREET, Sociology; HUDSON PARK,

Sea stories, Foreign children; BOND STREET, Composers and musicians of Germany, Composers and musicians of America; OTTENDORFER, Metallurgy, Radium and its application ; TOMPKINS SQUARE, Books on art, Sea tales; JACKSON SQUARE, New York City ; 67TH STREET, Benjamin Franklin ; 69TH STREET, Dog tales; BLOOMINGDALE, Hudson River, Fairy tales ; 125TH STREET, Africa, Greek and Roman art, Sculpture; TOTTENVILLE, Our presidents, The opera.

In addition there were bulletins on Washington at twenty branches, on Lincoln at seventeen branches, on St. Valentine's Day at four branches, on new books at four branches, and on Japan at two branches.

The seventeenth branch erected from the Carnegie fund was opened for circulation on February 19 at 209 West 23d Street; it provides a new home for the MUHLENBERG branch and for the administrative offices of the circulation department formerly located at the GEORGE BRUCE branch. The MuHLENBERG branch was first opened at 49 West 20th Street, February 25, 1893, as part of the New York Free Circulating Library system; after removal to 330 Sixth Avenue on January 2, 1897, it was finally located at 130 West 23d Street in April, 1898. It contains a stock of about 13,000 volumes and in its old quarters circulated about 109,000 per year.

Sunday opening has been discontinued at the CHATHAM SQUARE, JACKSON
SQUARE, 96TH STREET, BLOOMINGDALE, and Mott Haven branches, and evening
service after 9 p. m, at the OTTENDORFER, YORKVILLE, AMSTERDAM AVENUE, and
TREMONT branches, because of insufficient attendance.
Reading rooms open until 10 p. m. on week days are as follows:

RIVINGTON STREET branch, 61 Rivington Street;
BOND STREET branch, 49 Bond Street;
TOMPKINS SQUARE branch, 331 East roth Street;
RIVERSIDE branch, 190 Amsterdam Avenue;
135TH STREET branch, 103 West 135th Street.
WASHINGTON HEIGHTS branch, 922 St. Nicholas Avenue.

The following branches are open on Sundays from 2 to 6 p. m.:

RIVINGTON STREET branch, 61 Rivington Street ;
BOND STREET branch, 49 Bond Street;
OTTENDORFER branch, 135 Second Avenue;
TOMPKINS SQUARE branch, 331 East roth Street;
RIVERSIDE branch, 190 Amsterdam Avenue;
67TH STREET branch, 328 East 67th Street;
YORKVILLE branch, 222 East 79th Street;
AGUILAR branch, 174 East 110th Street;
HARLEM Library branch, 32 West 123d Street;
135TH STREET branch, 103 West 135th Street;
WASHINGTON HEIGHTS branch, 922 St. Nicholas Avenue.

In the course of public documents cataloguing analytical work on the collected documents of the State of Maine is just completed; this work includes, for the reports of various state officers and institutions usually bound up with the collected

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