Lectures on the Harvard Classics

Front Cover
P. F. Collier & Son, 1914 - Arts - 490 pages
Sixty introductory lectures, five each on history, poetry, natural science, philosophy, biography, prose fiction, criticism and the essay, education, political science, drama, voyages and travel, and religion.

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Contents

I
7
II
23
III
30
IV
36
V
41
VI
48
VII
66
VIII
71
XXX
235
XXXI
239
XXXII
254
XXXIII
259
XXXIV
266
XXXV
271
XXXVI
276
XXXVII
292

IX
76
X
81
XI
87
XII
105
XIII
110
XIV
115
XV
120
XVI
125
XVII
143
XVIII
148
XIX
153
XX
158
XXI
163
XXII
181
XXIII
186
XXIV
191
XXV
196
XXVI
201
XXVII
219
XXVIII
224
XXIX
230
XXXVIII
297
XXXIX
304
XL
309
XLI
314
XLII
332
XLIII
337
XLIV
342
XLV
346
XLVI
346
XLVII
353
XLVIII
363
XLIX
368
L
373
LII
391
LIII
396
LIV
401
LV
411
LVI
430
LVII
431
LVIII
431
LIX
436

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Page 55 - Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: "Pipe a song about a Lamb!' So I piped with merry cheer. 'Piper, pipe that song again;
Page 56 - Hail to thee, blithe Spirit! Bird thou never wert, That from Heaven, or near it, Pourest thy full heart In profuse strains of unpremeditated art. Higher still and higher From the earth thou springest Like a cloud of fire; The blue deep thou wingest, And singing still dost soar, and soaring ever singest.
Page 63 - BRIGHT STAR ! would I were steadfast as thou art :— Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night, And watching, with eternal lids apart, Like Nature's patient sleepless Eremite, The moving waters at their priestlike task Of pure ablution round earth's human shores...
Page 39 - I saw her just above the horizon, decorating and cheering the elevated sphere she just began to move in — glittering like the morning star, full of life, and splendor, and joy. Ohi what a Revolution! And what a heart must I have to contemplate without emotion that elevation and that fall!
Page 304 - Who could resist the charm of that spiritual apparition, gliding in the dim afternoon light through the aisles of St. Mary's, rising into the pulpit, and then, in the most entrancing of voices, breaking the silence with words and thoughts which were a religious music, — subtle, sweet, mournful?
Page 56 - The sounding cataract Haunted me like a passion : the tall rock, The mountain, and the deep and gloomy wood, Their colours and their forms, were then to me An appetite; a feeling and a love, That had no need of a remoter charm, By thought supplied, nor any interest Unborrowed from the eye.
Page 57 - For I have learned To look on nature, not as in the hour Of thoughtless youth, but hearing oftentimes The still sad music of humanity ; Nor harsh nor grating, though of ample power To chasten and subdue. And I have felt A presence that disturbs me with the joy Of elevated thoughts : a sense sublime Of something far more deeply interfused, Whose dwelling is the light of setting suns, And the round ocean and the living air, And the blue sky, and in the mind of man...
Page 305 - Be no longer a Chaos, but a World, or even Worldkin. Produce ! Produce ! Were it but the pitifullest infinitesimal fraction of a Product, produce it, in God's name ! 'Tis the utmost thou hast in thee : out with it, then. Up, up ! Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy whole might. Work while it is called Today ; for the Night cometh, wherein no man can work.
Page 299 - I call therefore a complete and generous education, that which fits a man to perform justly, skilfully, and magnanimously all the offices, both private and public, of peace and war.
Page 39 - Little did I dream when she added titles of veneration to those of enthusiastic, distant, respectful love, that she should ever be obliged to carry the sharp antidote against disgrace concealed in that bosom ; little did I dream that I should have lived to see such disasters fallen upon her in a nation of gallant men, in a nation of men of honour and of cavaliers. I thought ten thousand swords must have leaped from their scabbards to avenge even a look that threatened her with insult. But the age...

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