Page images
PDF
EPUB

Reenlistment rates for Navy Regulars by category, fiscal year 1955 to date

[blocks in formation]

- Adjusted reenlistment rates for fiscal year 1958 and thereafter eliminate to the extent practicable, distor., tions caused by large-scale early release programs.

NOTE.-See definitions of reenlistment rates given on p. 12.31.

Reenlistment rates for Marine Corps Regulars by category, fiscal year 1955 to date

[blocks in formation]

5, 075
5,883

14,043
19, 621

22.0
20.5

2, 281
3,342

10, 366
16, 316

76.0
76.9

2, 794
2,541

3,677 3, 305

July-December 1958

January-June 1959.
Fiscal year 1960, 1st 5 months.-

30.0

27.4

4,352 15, 899

17.4

2, 265

13, 037

72.9

2,087

July-September 1959.
October
November

2, 862

26.8
28 3
28.9

2, 925

801
626

10, 897
2, 833
2, 169

17. 2
17. 6
18.0

1,550

408
307

9.015
2, 316
1, 706

73. 1
76.0
68.9

1,375

393 319

1, 882

517 463

1" Adjusted" reenlistment rates for fiscal year 1959 eliminate to the extent practicable, distortions caused by large-scale early release programs.

Note.-See definitions of reenlistment rates given on p. 1231.

Reenlistment rates for Air Force Regulars by category, fiscal year 1955 to date

[blocks in formation]

! Adjusted reenlistment rates for fiscal year 1958 and thereafter eliminate to the extent practicable, distortions caused by large-scale early release programs. Increase in adjusted rate from fiscal year 1957 to fiscal year 1958 due in part to change in standards of eligibility for reenlistment.

NOTE.-See definitions of reenlistment rates given on pp. 1231.

Estimated male nonprior service accessions to active forces

Fiscal year :

Fiscal year–Continued

1951. 1952 1953. 1954. 1955.

1, 380, 000

960, 000
950,000
650,000
700,000

1956.
1957-
1958.
1959

580,000 570, 000 440,00 460, 000

52087 0_6015

Estimated military manpower gains from civil life, by source, fiscal years 1957–59

[blocks in formation]

Estimated military service status of male population, aged 19 to 26, June 30, 1959

[blocks in formation]

Initial enlistments and inductions by mental group, fiscal year 1959, Department HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

of Defense

Total

Enlistments

Inductions

Number

Total.

392, 049

280, 798

111, 251

Group I.
Group II
Group III.
Group IV 2

35, 633
109, 059
187, 104
60, 253

25, 560 83. 646 145, 599 25, 993

10, 073 25, 413 41, 505 34, 260

Percent distribution

Total.

100.0

100.0

100. O

Group I. Group II Group III Group IV 2

9. 1 27.8 47.7 15. 4

9.1 29.8 51.8 9.3

9. 1 22 8 37. 3 30.8

1 Male nonprior service enlistments into regular components subject to qualitative distribution quotas. a Includes 322 inductees who scored below mental group IV but were administratively accepted.

OFFICE OF THE ADJUTANT GENERAL

Washington, D.C.

AGPS-G

ARMY EDUCATION AND TRAINING PROGRAMS

The Army's educational system comprises :

On-the-job training (duty time).

Training at Army service schools (duty time). Training of military personnel at civilian institutions to meet specific post schooling requirements (duty time).

General educational development (voluntary individual study generally conducted after normal duty hours for self-development, increased understanding, and enhanced military performance).

ON-THE-JOB TRAINING

Much of the instruction that produces a skilled soldier is conducted on the job after he has completed basic combat and advanced individual training.

ARMY SERVICE SCHOOLS

The Army maintains 1 service Academy, 1 preparatory school, 2 service colleges, 19 branch schools, 11 specialist schools, and 11 miscellaneous schools and Department of the Army separate school courses that provide training for officer and enlisted personnel. Training provided in these schools is to meet specific personnel requirements of the Army and includes courses within the following occupational areas:

Combat.
Electronics.
Electrical maintenance.
Precision maintenance.
Military crafts.
Motor maintenance.
Clerical.
Graphics.
General technical.

Special assignment (e.g., language and area studies). Courses at Army service schools range in length from 8 weeks to 42 weeks, the average being 14 weeks. In scope and substance the enlisted courses are comparable to those of trade schools and technical institutes. Most require the application of fundamental civilian school disciplines. Army service school training is considered for appropriate academic credit by civilian schools and colleges under the recommendations of the American Council on Education. The Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences thereof publishes a guide for evaluation. This constitutes recognition of the formal educational nature of such schooling.

Approximately 30 of every 100 men coming into service are sent to an Army service school after they have completed basic combat training (8 weeks). Others may be selected for service schooling at some later date in order to provide progressive training in their occupational specialty. The rate of participation in this latter phase of service schooling is approximately 15 in every 100 men.

During fiscal year 1959, 57,677 officers and 73,932 enlisted personnel completed resident service school courses. Of the aggregate total of 131,609, 94,674 were personnel of the Active Army. The remainder were personnel of the U.S. Army Reserve, National Guard, foreign, and the other services.

DUTY-TIME TRAINING IN CIVILIAN INSTITUTIONS

During fiscal year 1959, 1,495 officers and 219 enlisted men completed highlevel professional and skills courses in graduate schools, industrial organizations, and technical institutes. Long courses (over 20 weeks) were usually those in civilian universities at the master and doctoral degree levels in critical academic specialties. Requirements for the latter, e.g., comptrollership, personnel management, nuclear studies, engineering, exist in general staff and the technical and administrative services.

« PreviousContinue »