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ance with either the Standardized Regulations (Government Civilians, Foreign Areas), Chapter 130, as from time to time amended, or other rates approved by the Mission Director. Subject to the written approval of the Mission Director, short-term employees may be paid per diem (in lieu of living quarters allownce) at rates prescribed by the Federal Travel Regulations, as from time to time amended, during the time such short-term employees spend at posts of duty in the Cooperating Country under this contract. In authorizing such per diem rates, the Mission Director shall consider the particular circumstances involved with respect to each such short-term employee including the extent to which meals and/or lodging may be made available without charge or at nominal cost by an agency of the United States Government or of the Cooperating Government, and similar factors.

(c) Temporary lodging allowance. Temporary lodging allowance is a quarters allowance granted to an employee for the reasonable cost of temporary quarters incurred by the employee and his family for a period not in excess of (i) three months after first arrival at a new post in a foreign area or a period ending with the occupation of residence (permanent) quarters, if earlier, and (ii) one (1) month immediately preceding final departure from the post subsequent to the necessary vacating of residence quarters. The Contractor will be reimbursed for payments made to employees and authorized dependents for temporary lodging allowance, in lieu of living quarters allowance, not to exceed the amount set forth in the Standardized Regulations (Government Civilians, Foreign Areas), Chapter 120, as from time to time amended.

(d) Post allowance. Post allowance is a cost-of-living allowance granted to an employee officially stationed at a post where the cost of living, exclusive of quarters cost, is substantially higher than in Washington, D.C. The Contractor will be reimbursed for payments made to employees for post allowance not to exceed those paid AID employees in the Cooperating Country, in accordance with the Standardized Regulations (Government Civilians, Foreign Areas), Chapter 220, as from time to time amended.

(e) Supplemental post allowance. Supplemental post allownce is a form of post allowance granted to an employee at his/her post when it is determined that assistance is necessary to defray extraordinary subsistence costs. The Contractor will be reimbursed for payments made to employees for supplemental post allowance not to exceed the amount set forth in the Standardized Regulations (Government Civilians, Foreign Areas), Chapter 230, as from time to time amended.

(f) Educational allowance. Educational allowance is an allowance to assist an employ

ee in meeting the extraordinary and necessary expenses, not otherwise compensated for, incurred by reason of his/her service in a foreign area in providing adequate elementary and secondary education for his/ her children. The Contractor will be reimbursed for payments made to regular employees for educational allowances for their dependent children in amounts not to exceed those set forth in the Standardized (Regulations Government Civilians, Foreign Areas), Chapter 270, as from time to time amended.

(g) Educational travel. Educational travel is travel to and from a school in the United States for secondary education (in lieu of an educational allowance) and for college education. The Contractor will be reimbursed for payments made to regular employees for educational travel for their dependent children provided such payment does not exceed that which would be payable in accordance with the Standardized Regulations (Government Civilians, Foreign Areas), Chapter 280, as from time to time amended. Educational travel shall not be authorized for regular employees whose assignment is less than two years.

(h) Separate maintenance allowance. Separate maintenance allowance is an allowance to assist an employee who is compelled, by reason of dangerous, notably unhealthful, or excessively adverse living conditions at his/her post of assignment in a foreign area, or for the convenience of the Government, to meet the additional expense of maintaining his/her dependents elsewhere than at such post. The Contractor will be reimbursed for payments made to regular employees for a separate maintenance allowance not to exceed that made to Aid employees in accordance with the Standardized Regulations (Government Civilians, Foreign Areas), Chapter 260, as from time to time amended.

(i) Payments during evacuation. The Standardized Regulations (Government Civilians, Foreign Areas) provide the authority for efficient, orderly, and equitable procedure for the payment of compensation, post differential and allowances in the event of an emergency evacuation of employees or their dependents, or both, from duty stations for military or other reasons or because of imminent danger to their lives. If evacuation has been authorized by the Mission Director the Contractor will be reimbursed for payments made to employees and authorized dependents evacuated from their post of assignment in accordance with the Standardized Regulations (Government Civilians, Foreign Areas), Chapter 600, and the Federal Travel Regulations, as from time to time amended.

(j) Danger pay allowance. (1) The contractor will be reimbursed for payments made to its employees for danger pay not to exceed that paid AID employees in the cooperating country, in accordance with the Standardized Regulations (Government Civilians, Foreign Areas), Chapter 650, as from time to time amended.

(2) Danger pay is an allowance that provides additional compensation above basic compensation to an employee in a foreign area where civil insurrection, civil war, terrorism or wartime conditions threaten physical harm or imminent danger to the health or well-being of the employee. The danger pay allowance is in lieu of that part of the post differential which is attributable to political violence. Consequently, the post differential may be reduced while danger pay is in effect to avoid dual crediting for political violence. (49 FR 13259, Apr. 3, 1984, as amended at 51 FR 11450, Apr. 3, 1986; 53 FR 50632, Dec. 16, 1988)

INSPECTION TRIPS BY CONTRACTOR'S OFFICERS

AND EXECUTIVES (APR. 1984) Provided it is approved by the Mission Director, the Contractor may send the Campus Coordinator, a professional member of its staff as an alternate to the Campus Coordinator, or such of its senior officials (e.g., president, vice presidents, deans, or department heads) to the Cooperating Country as may be required to review the progress of the work under this contract. Except for the Campus Coordinator or his/her alternate, no direct salary charges will be paid hereunder with respect to any such officials.

752.7031 Leave and holidays.

(a) Alternate 70. For use in AID cost reimbursement contracts performed in the United States, except for contracts with an educational institution.

LEAVE AND HOLIDAYS (APR. 1984)

752.7029 Post privileges.

For use in all AID contracts involving performance overseas.

(a) Contractor employees shall be entitled to such leave and holidays while serving in the United States as are provided in accordance with the Contractor's established policy and practice, but in no event shall vacation leave be earned at a rate exceeding 26 working days per annum, or sick leave be earned at a rate exceeding 13 working days per annum.

(b) Alternate 71. For use in AID cost reimbursement contracts with educational institutions, to be performed in the United States.

Post PRIVILEGES (APR. 1984) (a) Health room services of the same type that are normally provided to AID directhire U.S. citizen employees are generally available only for U.S. citizen contractor or subcontractor employees and their authorized dependents (regardless of citizenship) at the post of duty. These services do not include hospitalization, or predeparture or end of tour medical examinations. The services do include such medications as may be available; immunizations and preventive health measures; diagnostic examinations and advice; emergency treatment; and home visits as medically indicated.

(b) Privileges such as the use of APO, PX's, commissaries, and officer's clubs are established at posts abroad pursuant to agreements between the U.S. and Cooperating Governments. These facilities are intended for and usually limited to members of the official U.S. establishment including the Embassy, AID Mission, U.S. Information Service, and the Military. Normally, the agreements do not permit these facilities to be made available to nonofficial Americans.

LEAVE AND HOLIDAYS (DEC. 1988) (a) Vacation Leave.

(1) The Contractor may grant to his employees working in the United States under this contract vacations of reasonable duration, but not to exceed the Contractor's oncampus policy and practice for its employ. ees.

(2) Reimbursement to the Contractor for vacation leave is limited to the amount earned by the employees while serving under this contract.

(b) Sick Leave. The Contractor may grant to Contractor employees working in the United States, sick leave at a rate not exceeding its usual on-campus practice. However, reimburseme for sick leave taken under this Contract is limited to the amount earned by the employee while serving under this Contract.

(c) Military Leave. Military leave of not more than 15 calendar days in any calendar year may be granted in accordance with the Contractor's usual on-campus practice to each regular employee who is a reservist of the Armed Forces, provided that such mili

752.7030 Inspection trips by contractor's

officers and executives. For use in cost reimbursement contracts with an educational institution involving performance overseas.

tary leave has been approved in advance by the Mission Director or the Contracting Officer.

(d) Leave Records. The contractor's leave records shall be preserved and made available as part of the contractor's records which are required to be preserved and made available by the “Examination of Records by the Comptroller General" and “Audit" clauses of this contract.

(e) Holidays. While serving in the United States, contractor employees shall be entitled to holidays in accordance with the contractor's established on-campus policy and practice.

(c) Alternate 72. For use in addition to either Alternate 70 or 71, as appropriate, for any AID cost reimbursement contract involving performance overseas.

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LEAVE AND HOLIDAYS-OVERSEAS (AUG. 1989)

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(a) Vacation leave. (1) The Contractor may grant to its employees working overseas under this contract, vacations of reasonable duration in accordance with the Contractor's practice for its employees, but in no event shall such vacation leave be earned at a rate exceeding twenty-six (26) work days per annum. Vacation leave is provided under this contract primarily for purposes of affording necessary rest and recreation to regular employees during their tour of duty in the Cooperating Country. The Contractor's Chief of Party, the employee and the Cooperating Country institution associated with this project shall develop vacation leave schedules early in the employee's tour of duty taking into consideration project requirements, employee preference and other factors.

(2) Leave taken during the concluding weeks of an employee's tour shall be included in the established leave schedule and be limited to that amount of leave which can be earned during a twelve-month period unless approved in accordance with paragraph (a)(3) of this clause.

(3) Vacation leave earned but not taken by the end of the employee's tour pursuant to paragraphs (a) (1) and (2) of this clause will be forfeited, unless the requirements of the project precluded the employee from taking such leave and the Contracting Officer, with the endorsement of the Mission, approves one of the following as an alternative:

(i) Taking, during the concluding weeks of the employee's tour, leave not permitted under (a)2) of this section, or

(ii) Lump-sum payment for leave not taken provided such leave does not exceed the number of days which can be earned by the employee during a twelve-month period.

(b) Sick Leave. Sick leave is earned by regular and short-term employees in accordance with the Contractor's usual practice but not to exceed 13 work days per annum or 4 hours every 2 weeks. Additional sick leave after use of accrued vacation leave may be advanced in accordance with Contractor's usual practice, if in the judgment of the Contractor's Chief of Party it is determined that such additional leave is in the best interest of the project. In no event shall such additional leave exceed 30 days. The Contractor agrees to reimburse AID for leave used in excess of the amount earned during the employee's assignment under this contract. Sick leave earned and unused at the end of a regular tour of duty may be carried over to an immediately succeeding tour of duty under this contract. The taking of authorized home leave shall not constitute a break in service for the purpose of sick leave carryover. Contractor employees will not be compensated for unused sick leave at the completion of their duties under this contract.

(c) Home leave. (1) Home leave is leave earned for service abroad for use only in the United States, in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, or in the possessions of the United States.

(2) A regular employee who is a U.S. citizen or resident and has served at least 2 years overseas, as defined in paragraph (c)(4) of this clause, under this contract and has not taken more than 30 workdays leave (vacation, sick, or leave without pay) in the United States, may be granted home leave of not more than 15 calendar days for each such year of service overseas: Provided, that such regular employees agree to return overseas upon completion of home leave under an additional 2-year appointment, or for such shorter period of not less than 1 year of overseas service under the contract as the Mission Director may approve in advance. Home leave must be taken in the United States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, or the possessions of the United States and any days spent elsewhere will be charged to vacation leave or leave without pay.

(3) Notwithstanding the requirement in paragraph (c)(2), of this clause, that the Contractor's regular employee must have served 2 years overseas under this contract to be eligible for home leave, Contractor may grant advance home leave to such regular employee subject to all of the following conditions:

(i) Granting of advance home leave would in each case serve to advance the attainment of the objectives of this contract;

(ii) The regular employee shall have served a minimum of 18 months in the Cooperating Country on his/her current tour of duty under this contract; and

Contractor's usual practice to each regular employee whose appointment is not limited to 1 year or less and who is a reservist of the United States Armed Forces, provided that such military leave has been approved in advance by the cognizant Mission Director or Assistant Administrator. A copy of any such approval shall be provided to the Contracting Officer. (49 FR 13259, Apr. 3, 1984, as amended at 53 FR 50632, Dec. 16, 1988; 54 FR 37335, Sept. 8, 1989)

PART 753— FORMS

Subpart 753.1-General

753.107 Obtaining forms.

Subpart 753.2—Prescription of Forms 753.270 Prescription of AID Forms.

(iii) The regular employee shall have agreed to return to the Cooperating Country to serve out the remainder of his/her current tour of duty and an additional 2year appointment under this contract, or such other additional appointment of not less than 1 year of overseas service as the Mission Director may approve.

(4) The period of service overseas required under paragraph (c)(2) or paragraph (c)(3) of this clause, shall include the actual days in orientation in the United States (less language training) and the actual days overseas beginning on the date of departure from the United States port of embarkation on international travel and continuing, inclusive of authorized delays en route, to the date of arrival at the United States port of debarkation from international travel. Allowable vacation and sick leave taken while overseas, but not leave without pay, shall be included in the required period of service overseas. An amount equal to the number of days vacation and sick leave taken in the United States, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, or the possessions of the United States will be added to the required period of service overseas.

(5) Salary during travel to and from the United States for home leave will be limited to the time required for travel by the most expeditious air route. The Contractor will be responsible for reimbursing AID for salary payments made during home leave, if in spite of the undertaking of the new appointment, the regular employee, except for reasons beyond his/her control as determined by the Contracting Officer, does not return overseas and complete the additional required service. Unused home leave is not reimbursable under this contract.

(6) To the extent deemed necessary by the Contractor, regular employees in the United States on home leave may be authorized to spend not more than 5 days in work status for consultation at home office/campus or at AID/Washington before returning to their post of duty. Consultation at locations other than AID/Washington or home office/campus, as well as any time in excess of 5 days spent for consultation, must be approved by the Mission Director or the Contracting Officer.

(7) Except as provided in the schedule or approved by the Mission Director or the Contracting Officer, home leave is not authorized for TCN or CCN employees.

(a) Holidays. Holidays for Contractor employees serving overseas should take into consideration local practices and shall be established in collaboration with the Mission Director.

(e) Military leave. Military leave of not more than 15 calendar days in any calendar year may be granted in accordance with the

Subpart 753.3—Illustrations of Forms 753.300 Scope of Subpart.

AUTHORITY: Sec. 621, Pub. L. 87-195, 75 Stat. 445 (22 U.S.C. 2381), as amended; E.O. 12163, Sept. 29, 1979 44 FR 56673, 3 CFR 1979 Comp., p. 435.

SOURCE: 53 FR 50632, Dec. 16, 1988, unless otherwise noted.

Subpart 753.1-General

753.107 Obtaining forms.

Copies of any AID Form referenced in the AIDAIR may be obtained from the Agency for International Development, Washington, DC 20523, Attention: SER/MO/CPM/M, Distribution, Room B-929 N.S., or from the congni. zant Contracting Officer.

Subpart 753.2—Prescription of Forms 752.270 Prescription of AID forms.

The requirements for use of AID forms are contained in Parts 701 through 752 where the subject matter applicable to the form is addressed.

Subpart 753.3—Illustration of Forms

753.300 Scope of subpart.

AID forms are not illustrated in the AIDAR. Copies of any AID form prescribed in the AIDAR may be obtained as provided in 753.107.

Appendices to Chapter 7

APPENDIX A RESPECTIVE ROLES OF

CONTRACTING AND OTHER PERSON-
NEL IN THE AID PROCUREMENT
PROCESS

1. Basic Policy Only a contracting officer, designated to enter into contracts and make the determinations and findings related thereto (or an authorized representative of the contracting officer acting within the limits of his/her authority), may bind the United States Government to a contract, or direct or authorize a contractor to proceed with work. 2. Planning, Competition, Negotiation, and

Award (a) Preaward technical discussions with potential contractors should be conducted in such a manner as to preclude the assumption by any potential contractor that a commitment has been made. AID employees are responsible for insuring that no unfair competitive advantage is afforded one contractor over any other contractor in competing for Agency contracts. In this connection, discussions with prospective contractors prior to the final selection of the contractor and commencement of negotiations by the contracting officer must be conducted with the greatest discretion. Under no circumstances should the specific amount of funds which the Agency has available to support a contract be made known to a prospective contractor. No AID employee is authorized to dilute the Agency's negotiation position prior to or during an “arm's length" negotiation conducted between AID and the contractors with whom it does business. The requirement for preservation of the Agency's negotiation position must be scrupulously observed whether the procurement is to be negotiated with a single, non-competitive source or whether it is to be negotiated on the basis of multiple competitive proposals. It is advisable to involve the contracting officer in the project planning cycle as early as possible, and to insure that he/she or his/her representative is either present at any meeting with prospective contractors, or is consulted prior to such a meeting.

(b) Contracting personnel act upon requirements which are formulated by the planning, technical, and research offices of the Agency. Contracting officers obtain the information they need on technical requirements by questions and discussions with the pianning, technical, and research offices of the Agency. If a contract is to be tenable, the end result which is desired must be described with completeness and exactitude. The scope of the work must be explicitly

stated; otherwise the contracting officer cannot assure terms in a contract by which the desired action can be enforced. If the requiring office cannot provide a point of departure in these terms and deliver to the contracting officer a clear-cut description of the purpose and outline the limits of the scope, results may be disappointing and the possibility of deferring the project until these elements can be given more concrete dimensions should be considered. Finally, the requiring office should insure that the scope of work and funding information are delivered to the contracting officer with sufficient lead time to allow for proper preparation and planning of the procurement.

(c) One of the paramount duties of the contracting officer is to ensure full and open competition for any planned procurement. The procedures for procurement by sealed bid, or for procurement by negotiation, or for procurement by other than full and open competition differ; the contracting officer must determine the proper method of procurement and contract type, keeping the requirements for full and open competition in mind. The technical office has a continuing responsibility to assist the contracting officer in this effort to ensure full and open competition. This responsibility should be exercised through proper planning to allow sufficient lead time, and preparation of scopes of work designed to encourage full and open competition by avoiding specifica. tions, descriptions, or work statements which could unnecessarily restrict competition.

3. Contract Administration Meetings to discuss contract matters with contractors should be preceded by sufficient advance notification to all parties, including the contracting officer, to permit advance arrangements for the attendance at such meetings. Technical personnel shall not hold discussions of contract problems with contractors or technical problems with contractual implications without arranging for attendance by contracting personnel. Once a meeting with a contractor has been agreed upon and the issues have been made known to all involved parties, an internal AID meeting should take place between techni. cal and contracting personnel, with the Country Desk representative and such other personnel in attendance as may be necessary, to establish an AID position or line of inquiry to be followed in the meeting with the contractor. If differences of opinion arise among AID personnel in the meeting with the contractor, such differences should never be discussed in the meeting with the contractor. AID personnel shall adjourn to

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