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CONGRESSIONAL PRINTING AND BINDING-VOLUME INCREASE OR DECREASE, AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 1978

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A. Congressional Record program
A. Bound Record.....
A. Daily.....
A. Index......
B. Miscellaneous publicatio
C. Committee prints ....
D. Miscellaneous printing a
F. Franked envelopes....
F. Document franks.....
G. Business calendars...
H. Bills, resolutions, and amendments..
I. Committee reports..
J. Documents.....
K. Hearings.....

(1. 500)
(8,000)

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40,000
47,000
40,000

2,500
60.500
128,000
170,000
57,000

7,000
52.000
166,000
45,000

28,000
578,000

2.500

1,300
(3.000)
5,000

5.700

44,000
44,500
44,000

2,500
59,000
120,000
170,000
60,000

6,500
55,000
170,000
45,000
25,000
550,000

3,000

(500)
3,000
4,000

5.3
(7.1)

22.8
(5.5)
3.1

5.

2.4

55,000
161, 000
45,000
28,000
562,000

16,000

2.8

(3, 000) (28,000)

(10.7)
(4.8)

1 The cost of the Congressional Record is pro-rated between the Congressional Printing and Binding and the Printing and Binding Appropriations, therefore the quantity measure (pages) will remain constant. JUSTIFY INCREASE OVER INFLATION FACTOR Mr. BENJAMIN. You are requesting $76,212,000, an increase of $2,251,000. How much of this increase is due to inflation? Justify the balance of the increase.

Mr. BOYLE. In the $2,251,000 increase, Mr. Chairman, we are estimating a volume decrease in most of the categories in the Congressional Printing and Binding Appropriation, but we have a labor increase and a materials increase. The materials increase is the greatest part of our increase. Right now, we have factored in paper increases for fiscal 1979 and fiscal 1980 that amount to 10 percent.

The paper market is inflated because of strikes on the West Coast, where there are 17 paper mills on strike. The mills are starting to settle now, but there are 130 paper mills whose contracts run out in the spring of this year, and we are not optimistic on the paper situation.

We buy our paper by competitive bid on a quarterly basis, and the paper increase in the last two quarters totalled somewhere in the neighborhood of 30 percent. The paper increases last year were over 40 percent, and we don't see any relief. So just our materials cost, and in some of the areas, particularly in the Congressional Record and the Federal Register that use tons of paper every day in comparison to that used on short-run jobs, we see our costs going up more than we have estimated in our appropriation requestmore than we have allowed for. So most of the increase in this category is in materials costs.

NUMBER OF COPIES OF CONGRESSIONAL RECORD Mr. BENJAMIN. How many copies of the Congressional Record are charged to this appropriation and who receives them?

Mr. BOYLE. In the daily Congressional Record, we have 17,159 copies-well, let me correct that. To this appropriation, Congressional Printing and Binding, there are 5,667 copies charged to this appropriation. There are 17,159 charged to the Printing and Binding Appropriation. Now, to the Congressional Printing and Binding, as to who receives them, the Senate receives, by law, 218 copies; the House receives 930 copies; the Joint Committee on Printing receives 3,224 copies, and the balance of copies, by law, chargeable to this appropriation, are 1,295.

So of the total number of copies printed daily, 34,104, 5,667 copies get charged to this appropriation

Mr. BENJAMIN. Has the volume changed much in the past few years?

Mr. Boyle. The volume has gone down because of this committee's action two years ago, that cut the Members' copies by 50 percent in the House and the Senate. Really it was cut by more than that because with the staff work our people did, contacting every one of the committees, many of the committees and the Members of the Congress cut their number of authorized copies voluntarily below the by-law authorization. The total number of copies decreased by 15,000. We had been printing 50,000 daily.

The number of pages printed which really determines the actual cost, fluctuates up and down. Every year it changes. The number of

pages are greater in a second session of Congress, and they fluctuate, the first session lower, second session back up. The number of pages has been as low as 35,000 up to a high of 51,000, which we had in 1972. That is the highest year that I have on my chart. In the past several years the Congressional Record has ranged between forty-four, forty, forty-three, thirty-five thousand pages. It is purely predicated on the number of days that Congress is going to be in session. If we knew in advance the number of days you were going to be in session, we could come very close to a total estimate by using the average number of pages we print every day. Last year we averaged 220 pages per daily issue of the Congressional Record.

Mr. BENJAMIN. I am going to submit several questions for response on the record. And before going into Printing and Binding, I will yield to Mr. Smith for any questions he may have on Congressional Printing and Binding.

[The information follows:]
Question. Note increase and decreases in various categories. Explain.
(A) Congressional Record:

1979, 40,000 pages, $4.3 million.

1980, 44,000 pages, $4.7 million. (B) Miscellaneous publications:

1979, 60,500 pages, $5.3 million.

1980, 59,000 pages, $5.7 million. (C) Miscellaneous printing and binding:

1979, 170 million units, $7.9 million.

1980, 170 million units, $8.4 million. (D) Details to Congress:

1979, $5.4 million.

1980, $5.5 million. (F) Franked envelopes and document franks:

1979, 57 million envelopes, 7 million franks, $1.0 million.

1980, 60 million envelopes, 6.5 million franks, $1.1 million. (G) House and Senate committee and business calendars:

1979, 52,000 pages, $2.3 million.

1980, 55,500 pages, $2.6 million. (H) Bills, resolutions, and amendments:

1979, 166,000 pages, $9.9 million.

1980, 170,000 pages, $10.7 million. (1) Committee reports:

1979, 45,000 pages, $3.9 million.

1980, 45,000 pages, $4.2 million. (J) Documents:

1979, 28,000 pages, $1.9 million.

1980, 25,000 pages, $1.7 million. (K) Hearings:

1979, 578,000 pages, $23.7 million.

1980, 550,000 pages, $23.2 million. Response. In estimating the funds necessary, volume estimates are made for each category of work based on past experiences. Rates are estimated on the basis of our latest experience with projections of future increases due to rising costs. Rate increases are due to an estimated labor cost increase of 7 percent and 10 percent increase in material cost. Certain of these categories do not reflect the full increase due to automation and improved work methods. Savings for productivity increases and changing work methods are applied when appropriate.

The following is an explanation of the various increases and decreases between FY 1979 and FY 1980 by categories:

A. Congressional Record has a 4,000 page and $.55 per page rate increase for a net increase of $.4 million. The record normally increases in volume during the 2d Session.

B. Miscellaneous Publications has a 1,500 page decrease and a $7.63 per page rate increase with the net effect of $.4 million increase. This category normally declines in volume during the 2d Session.

C. Miscellaneous Printing and Binding has a $2.70 per copy rate increase with a net effect of $.5 million increase. The volume of this category is expected to remain the same as the previous year.

D. Details to Congress reflect labor increases only as volume is expected to remain the same as the previous year.

F. Franked Envelopes reflect a 3,000 unit increase in volume and a $1.11 rate increase for a net effect of a $100,000 increase. Document Franks will decrease slightly in volume and the rate will increase by $.84 per 1,000.

G. Committee and Business Calendars indicate a 3,000 page increase and a rate increase of $3.18 per page for a total of $300,000 increase. Calendars increase in volume in the 2d Session because in many cases they are cumulative.

H. Bills, Resolutions and Amendments are anticipated to increase by 4,000 pages with a $3.59 per page rate increase for a net effect of a $800,000 increase. This category is generally heavier in volume in the 2d Session and we have projected some savings due to new technological changes.

I. Committee Reports will have a rate increase of $6.24 per page for a total increase of $300,000. There is no anticipated volume increase.

J. Documents volume is anticipated to decrease by 3,000 pages and the rate will increase by $3.64 per page for a net effect of a decrease of $200,000. The trend for this category is to decline in volume in the 2d Session.

K. Hearings are anticipated to decrease by 28,000 pages with a $1.32 per page rate increase. The net effect will be a reduction of $500,000. This category normally declines in the 2d Session.

Question. Is the volume of binding of hearings, debates, and so forth for the House and Senate increasing? Will you update the tables on page 219 of last year's hearings to show the increase or decrease?

Response.

SUMMARY OF PUBLICATIONS BOUND FOR HOUSE COMMITTEES-FISCAL YEAR 1978

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1 A summary of work ordered during fiscal year 1978, through the Office of the Clerk of the House for Members and billed to the congressional printing and binding appropriation.

SUMMARY OF PUBLICATIONS BOUND FOR SENATE COMMITTEES-FISCAL YEAR 1978

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11

169, 254

2, 009 $171, 263

Senate Members (number of copies bound)'.

Total Senate...

1, 383

1 A summary of work ordered during fiscal year 1978, through the Office of the Secretary of the Senate for Members and billed to the congressional printing and binding appropriation.

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