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PRIVATE LAWS

OF THE

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

PASSED BY THE

SIXTY-SIXTH CONGRESS,

1919-1921.

XV

PRIVATE LAWS OF THE SIXTY-SIXTH CONGRESS

OF THE

UNITED STATES Passed at the first session, which was begun and held at the city of Washington, in the

District of Columbia, on Monday, the nineteenth day of May, 1919, and was

adjourned without day on Wednesday, the nineteenth day of November, 1919. WOODROW WILSON, President; THOMAS R. MARSHALL, Vice President; ALBERT B.

CUMMINGS, President of the Senate pro tempore; FREDERICK H. GILLETT, Speaker of the House of Representatives.

October 25, 1919. (S. J. Res. 90.]

Preamble.

CHAP. 83,-Joint Resolution To readmit Frances Scoville-Mumm to the character and privileges of a citizen of the United States.

(Private Res. No. 1.] Whereas Frances Scoville-Mumm, daughter of C. C. K. Scoville, a

citizen of the United States residing in the State of Kansas, being a native-born citizen of the United States, married in 1913 Walter Mumm, an alien of German birth and parentage, but at the time of, and for many years prior to, said marriage, a resident of France;

and Whereas the said Frances Scoville-Mumm has since returned to the

United States and renewed her residence therein and petitioned Congress to be readmitted to the character and privileges of a citizen of the United States under and by virtue of the power and laws of the United States of America: Therefore

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That Frances Scoville- Frances ScovilleMumm, daughter of the said C. C. K. Scoville, be, and she is hereby, Readmitted as a cition her own application unconditionally readmitted to the character and privileges of a citizen of the United States.

Received by the President, October 14, 1919.

[NOTE BY THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE.-The foregoing joint resolution having been presented to the President of the United States for his approval, and not having been returned by him to the house of Congress in which it originated within the time prescribed by the Constitution of the United States, has become a law without his approval.]

Edith Carow Roosevelt.

October 27, 1919. CHAP. 84.-An Act Granting a franking privilege to Edith Carow Roosevelt. (H. R. 7138.)

(Private, No. 1.) Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That all mail matter sent by the post by Edith Carow Roosevelt, widow of the late Theodore Franking privilege Roosevelt, under her written autograph signature, be conveyed free granted to. of postage during her natural life. Approved, October 27, 1919.

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be disinterred.

November 6, 1910. CHAP. 96.-An Act Providing for the disinterment and removal of the remains of (H.R. 333.)*

the infant child, Norman Lee Molzahn, from the temporary burial site in the District (Private, No. 2.) of Columbia to a permanent burial place.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United Norman Lee Molzáhn.

States of America in Congress assembled, That the health officer of the Remains of, in Dis. District of Columbia be, and he hereby is, authorized to issue a permit trict of Columbia, may

to A. J. Molzahn to disinter and remove the remains of his infant child, Norman Lee Molzahn, who died of diphtheria, from its temporary burial site in the District of Columbia to such lot or place in the

District of Columbia or elsewhere as the father may choose for a Condition. permanent burial place, the body having been embalmed and con

tained in a copper-lined casket, but such permit shall not be issued unless there has been filed in the Health Department of the District of Columbia, a permit from the proper governmental authorities at the place where the reinterment is to be made, authorizing said interment there of the said remains.

Received by the President, October 25, 1919.

[NOTE BY THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE.—The foregoing act having been presented to the President of the United States for his approval, and not having been returned by him to the house of Congress in which it originated within the time prescribed by the Constitution of the United States, has become a law without his approval.]

.

juries.

November 8, 1919.

(H. R. 753.] CHAP. 97.-An Act For the relief of Susie Currier. [Private, No. 3.)

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United Payment to, for in- States of America in Congress assembled, that the Secretary of the

Treasury be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to pay to Susie Currier, of Old Town, Maine, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, the sum of $100, being full compensation for accident and injuries with resulting loss of time and expense while working as charwoman in the United States post office at Old Town, Maine, December 14, 1914.

Received by the President, October 25, 1919.

[NOTE BY THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE.— The foregoing act having been presented to the President of the United States for his approval, and not having been returned by him to the house of Congress in which it originated within the time prescribed by the Constitution of the United States, has become a law without his approval.]

November 6, 1919.

(H. R. 2452.) CHAP. 98.-An Act For the relief of Charles A. Carey. (Private, No. 4.)

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United Charles A. Carey. Payment to, for in- States of America in Congress assembled, that the Secretary of the juries.

Treasury be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to pay to Charles A. Carey, of Lowell, Massachusetts, the sum of $132.57, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for loss of pay on account of injury sustained while in the performance of his duty as a letter carrier at Lowell, Massachusetts, on the 11th day of February, in the year 1913.

Received by the President, October 25, 1919.

[NOTE BY THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE.—The foregoing act having been presented to the President of the United States for his approval, and not having been returned by him to the house of Congress in which it originated within the time prescribed by the Constitution of the United States, has become a law without his approval.]

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