The Pursuit of Knowledge Under Difficulties: Illustrated by Anecdotes. With Portraits, Volume 2

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Harper & brothers, 1847 - Self-culture
 

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Page 261 - The trunk of an elephant that can pick up a pin or rend an oak, is as nothing to it. It can engrave a seal, and crush masses of obdurate metal like wax, before it, — draw out, without breaking, a thread as fine as gossamer, and lift a ship of war like a bauble in the air. It can embroider muslin, and forge anchors, — cut steel into ribands, and impel loaded vessels against the fury of the winds and waves.
Page 75 - New Experiments Physico-mechanical, touching the spring of the air, and its effects ; (made for the most part in a new pneumatical engine) written .... by the honourable Robert Boyle, Esq* experiment xxxvi.
Page 241 - An admirable and most forcible way to drive up water by fire, not by drawing or sucking it upwards, for that must be as the philosopher calleth it, infra spheeram activitatis, which is but at such a distance. But this way hath no bounder, if the vessels be strong enough ; for I have taken a piece of a whole cannon, whereof the end was burst, and filled it three...
Page 284 - Now you will not assert, gentlemen, said I, that it is more difficult to construct a machine that shall weave than one which shall make all the variety of moves which are required in that complicated game.
Page 261 - By his admirable contrivance, it has become a thing stupendous alike for its force and its flexibility — for the prodigious power which it can exert, and the ease, and precision, and ductility, with which that power can be varied, distributed, and applied. The trunk of an elephant, that can pick up a pin or rend an oak, is as nothing to it.
Page 127 - I could be happy," he very movingly says, "on my going home, to find some corner where I could sit down in the middle of my studies, books, and casts after the antique, to paint this work and others, Where I might have models of nature when necessary, bread and soup, and a coat to cover me ! I should...
Page 403 - ... faithful Records, of all the works of Nature, or Art, which can come within their reach : that so the present Age, and posterity, may be able to put a mark on the Errors, which have been strengthened by long prescription : to restore the Truths, that have lain neglected : to push on those, which are already known, to more various uses : and to make the way more passable, to what remains unreveal'd.
Page 284 - ... be little difficulty in producing and repeating them. Full of these ideas, I immediately employed a carpenter and smith to carry them into effect. As soon as the machine was finished, I got a weaver to put in the warp, which was of such materials as sailcloth is usually made of.
Page 30 - There is a house full of people, and right nasty. The czar lies next your library, and dines in the parlour next your study. He dines at ten o'clock, and six at night, is very seldom at home a whole day, very often in the King's Yard, or by water, dressed in several dresses. The king is expected here this day ; the best parlour is pretty clean for him to be entertained in. The king pays for all he has.
Page 122 - I mention it only, as it shows the solicitude and extreme activity which he had about every thing that related to his art; that he wished to have his objects embodied as it were, and distinctly before him; that he neglected nothing which could keep his faculties in exercise, and derived hints from every sort of combination.

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