Plutarch's Lives, tr. by J. and W. Langhorne, Volumes 3-4

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 337 - The march begins in military state, And nations on his eye suspended wait : Stern Famine guards the solitary coast, And Winter barricades the realms of Frost : He comes : nor want nor cold his course delay.
Page 336 - On what foundation stands the warrior's pride, How just his hopes, let Swedish Charles decide. A frame of adamant, a soul of fire, No dangers fright him, and no labours tire...
Page 353 - Tis not in mortals to command success, But we'll do more, Sempronius; we'll deserve it.
Page 23 - The blue-eyed myriads from the Baltic coast The prostrate South to the destroyer yields Her boasted titles and her golden fields • With grim delight the brood of winter view A brighter day, and heavens of azure hue, Scent the new fragrance of the breathing rose, And quaff the pendent vintage as it grows.
Page 126 - But war's a game, which, were their subjects wise, Kings would not play at.
Page 45 - Two urns by Jove's high throne have ever stood, The source of evil one, and one of good ; From thence the cup of mortal man he fills, Blessings to these, to those distributes ills; To most, he mingles both : the wretch decreed To taste the bad, unmix'd, is cursed indeed; Pursued by wrongs, by meagre famine driven, He wanders, outcast both of earth and heaven.
Page 119 - And, in truth, all the rest of the Syracusans were no more than the body in the batteries of Archimedes, while he himself was the informing soul. All other weapons lay idle and unemployed ; his were the only offensive and defensive arms of the city.
Page 337 - On Moscow's walls till Gothic standards fly, 'And all be mine beneath the polar sky.' The march begins in military state, And nations on his eye suspended wait; Stern Famine guards the solitary coast, And Winter barricades the realms of Frost; He comes, not want and cold his course delay; — Hide, blushing Glory, hide Pultowa's day...
Page 119 - ... of mathematical knowledge, that, though in the invention of these machines he gained the reputation of a man" endowed with divine rather than human knowledge, yet he did not vouchsafe to leave any account of them in writing. For he considered all attention to mechanics, and every art that ministers to common uses, as mean and sordid, and placed his whole delight in those intellectual speculations, which, without any relation to the necessities of life, have an intrinsic excellence arising from...
Page 197 - A good man will take care of his horses and dogs, not only while they are young, but when old and past service.

Bibliographic information