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NAVAL AIR STATION, ALAMEDA, AND NAVAL AIR STATION, ALEXANDRIA

sonnpened. Theexandria, Vair station,

Admiral CONARD. The next factors are opening naval air station Alameda, Calif., 10 positions, and opening naval torpedo factory Alexandria, Va., 4 positions.

The 14 positions for the air station, Alameda, Calif., and the toi pedo station, Alexandria, Va., are necessary if these stations are 1 be opened. The initial appointments at Alameda will be of per sonnel capable of supervisory work as the station expands, requii ing higher average pay.

Mr. UMSTEAD. What compensation do you propose to pay to th personnel intended for Alameda ?

Admiral CONARD. At Alameda in the office of the supply depar ment to be four employees, one getting $2,300, one getting $2,00 and two getting $1,800 each. In the storehouse office there are to 1 two, one getting $2,300 and one getting $1,620. In the accountin department there is to be one getting $2,300 and one getting $1,04 and in the disbursing office there is to be one at $2,000 and one i $1,620, making a total of $19,360.

Mr. UMSTEAD. That would be a partial force only?
Admiral CONARD. Yes, sir.

Mr. UMSTEAD. I believe it is a fact, is it not, that the Navy lu not, up until this time, done any work at Alameda looking towal the construction of the shore station ?

Admiral Coxard. It has just recently acquired the rights to d cupy the area.

Mr. UMSTEAD. That is correct, and they have between now and ti end of the fiscal year 1938. It will be possible to do but little of t actual work?

Admiral CONARD. That is correct.

Mr. UMSTEAD. In the fiscal year 1939 about all that the Depal ment can do at Alameda is to begin the construction of the sho station there?

Admiral ('oxARD. Well, I am not familiar with the exact plans. do not know how far they will go, but we have gone over the situ tion and found that it will probably be necessary to have these pe on the ground.

Mr. ÜƏSTEAD. That it probably will be necessary?
Admiral (OXARD. Yes.

Mr. UMSTEAD. Well, have you any reason to believe that all them will be necessary; quite positively?

Admiral (OXARD. Not positively, but we think they should be pi vided for, and we expect to get them there so that the work can undertaken.

Admiral KIMMEL. The best answer to that, I think, is that actual ing to the plans that have been submitted to your committee we pect by the end of 1939 to expend about $3,000,000 out there.

Mr. UMSTEAD. Well, that work, Admiral, will be under the trol of the Bureau of Yards and Docks.

Admiral KIMMEL. Yes, sir.

Mr. UMSTEAD. And so far as the construction is concerned, all the employees incident to the construction will be furnished by 1 Bureau of Yards and Docks out of the appropriation made for 1 purpose of constructing this station there.

Admiral KIMMEL. I am merely trying to indicate the extent of the rork that would be undertaken, that we plan to undertake.

Mr. CMSTEAD. If all of the construction cost must come out of the ppropriation of the the Bureau of Yards and Docks, then I am aving difficulty in understanding why, when that work is merely eginning, the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts will need 10 men here as indicated by their request in this appropriation. Can you elp me any with that?

Admiral KIMMEL. It is more than merely beginning, Mr. Chairnan, I think. If they are to spend a million dollars and they are to nake contracts this spring or this winter, as soon as they begin, » September of next year, perhaps, they will need some accounting seople there. They will have some activities there probably all of he time.

Mr. UMSTEAD. Do you mean by letting contracts that the Navy Department will let such contracts to private contractors as may be secessary to carry on the work?

Admiral KIMMEL. Yes; we will have done something, I hope, and then we will put some kind of a naval activity there.

Mr. L'MSTEAD. Of course, the first 12 or 15 months will be consumed practically in filling the submerged areas. Admiral KIMMEL. That is true. Mr. UMSTEAD. That will be done by contract?

Admiral KIMMEL. On the abandoned field part we will have some kind of a naval unit established while they are making land out of water over there on the Alameda side.

Mr. UMSTEAD. Of course, you would have a considerable unit if you have 10 employees of the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts out there at one time. That would be a pretty good start.

Captain W'ATROUS. During the period this construction work is going on, the Bureau of Yards and Docks employees must be paid, and the accounting work continued from its inception.

Mr. l'MSTEAD. Admiral, you stated a moment ago that you need four employees at the naval torpedo factory, Alexandria, for expanding the activities of which funds are requested in this budget?

Admiral (OXARD. That is right.
Mr. l'MSTEAD. Is that a partial force?

Admiral CONARD. That would be a start, yes; four employees at $1.800 each, $7.200.

INCREASED WORK AT NAVY YARDS AND AIR STATIONS

The fourth factor is increased work at navy yards and air stations, due to increase in the size of ships, 51 positions. The 51 additional positions were selected from the requests for 74 additional positions submitted by navy yards and stations to provide ilureased personnel for performing the increased work of the supply, accounting, and disbursing offices. The requests have been carefully considered and the increases are essential to the proper functioning of these activities. Would you like to have a sist of those, Mr. Chairman?

Mr. C'MSTEAD. Not for the printed record.
Admiral CONARD. They are all shown there.
Mr. C'MSTEAD. How many positions did you ask the Budget for

this purpose?

Captain WATROUS. The request from the field activities wis í: 74 employees, but S. and A. in its estimates reduced it to 51.

Mr. UMSTEAD. Generally, what kind of work would these to ployees be engaged in?

Admiral CONARD. It is the usual distribution in storehouse, a counting, and disbursing departments.

Mr. UMSTEAD. Approximately what is the pay range?

Commander HULLFISH. From $1,260 to $2,000. Most of them also $1,620.

Mr. UMSTEAD. Have you a statement showing the distribution or those employees, the manner in which you propose to divide to additional personnel among the different naval establishments!

Admiral COXARD. Yes, sir; the distribution is as follows:

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The next factor is accuunulation of annual leave due to the de mands for services which have prevented granting leave as it accruen services of temporary employees.

This increase in group IVb labor is made necessary to enable t. liquidation of accumulated leave. Reports have been received shon. ing that there has accumulated from 13 to 35 days' leave per capita, with the largest activities showing an average accumulation of in days. With the required work load, leave cannot be granted at earned in all cases, nor can the accumulations be absorbed entire

ithout hiring additional labor to permit the work to go on. The mount requested is 2.42 percent of the total allocated for this purose in 1938, and would cover about 7 days' leave for the entire force.

POLICY OF DEPARTMENT AS TO LEAVE

Mr. UMSTEAD. Admiral, is it the policy of the Navy Department allow employees to accumulate leave? Admiral CONARD. It is not the policy, but it is necessarily the pracice, as due to the rapidly expanding Navy the work load has inreased beyond the ability of the funds available to provide sufficient mployees to perform necessary work and grant leave as earned.

Mr. UMSTEAD. Is it the policy or the practice of the Navy Departnent to hire temporary employees to do the work of regular employees in leave?

Admiral Conard. Only partially. In cases of small establishments t is necessary.

Mr. UMSTEAD. Where you undertake to regulate the leave of regular mployees so as to avoid the need to hire temporary employees do you have any difficulty staggering the leave?

Admiral Coward. Yes; as we have an insufficient number of employees to carry on in a proper way. Ordinarily, the estimate of the number of employees required at a given station contemplates that there will be a certain proportion of them on leave throughout the Fear.

LABOR, SKILLED AND UNSKILLED, OTHER THAN CLASSIFIED Labor other than classified is employed not only in the routine operations of the navy yards, but in connection with inspection of food, and packing and handling of household effects. The increases requested are as follows: Additional labor to carry increased load at yards and stations due to

increases in size of ships and number of aircraft in service (p. M-40). $4,000 Additional labor to pack, crate, and handle household effects of officers,

nurses, and certain classes of enlisted men in yards and stations, due to the increase in the numbers entitled to such packing from 29,370 in 1937 to 34,332 in 1939 (M-9 and M-48).

9, 53) Hire of additional labor to permit the performance of work deferred

from 1938 to keep within the allocations for the year, and to allow acrumulated leave to be taken (p. M-40).

94, 385 Total.

107, 915 Mr. PLUMLEY. Was that work deferred by reason of insufficient appropriation ?

Admiral COXARD. Precisely.

The first item, $4,000, labor, skilled and unskilled, is required in direct proportion to the volume of stores to be handled. A study of the requests from yards and stations indicates that an increase of at least $4.000 will be needed to meet the trend indicated above.

Mr. Plr MLEY. How was the item of $4,000 increase arrived at? Admiral Conard. By taking the requests from all over the field for additional labor allotments, and scaling it down to what we thought was a reasonable amount to ask for.

The increase in skilled and unskilled labor is due in approximately equal proportion to accumulated leave and to hire of additional labor to perform work deferred due to the necessity for curtailment of activity in order to keep within the allocations for 1937 and 1938. That is estimated at $94,385.

The item of $9,530 covers labor in navy yards and stations in connection with the packing, crating, and handling of the household effects of officers, nurses, chief petty officers, and petty officers, first class. In 1937 there were 29,370 persons entitled to this service, and the yards report 1,849 lots packed and handled by yard labor at a cost of $131,944, average $27.21. On the same basis, with 31,332 persons entitled to this packing in 1939, it is estimated there will be 5,668 lots packed in navy yards at a cost of $154,226. This exceeds the 1938 committee allocation of $144,696 by $9,530.

Mr. UMSTEAD. Why do you estimate that 4,962 more persons will be entitled to the packing privilege in 1939 than were so entitled in 1937?

Admiral CONARD. Because of the increase in personnel who move about from place to place; the increase in officers and personnel in the Navy.

Mr. UMSTEAD. But the figure of increase you give there is almost as great as the entire increase in the officer and enlisted personnel in the Navy during the year.

Commander HULLFISH. There was a change in the division by grades. We put more men in the upper pay grades. It is the officer and the men in the first two pay grades who are entitled to this crating and transportation of household effects.

Mr. UMSTEAD. Your distribution for 1939 is practically the same as for 1938, as disclosed in the hearings on Saturday of last week.

Commander HULLFISH. That is true. The percentages were the same, but in 1938 the percentage of petty officers, first class, waincreased from 1.200 to 1,395. This alone increased the numbers 1,881, and the balance of the increase is due to the increased personnel from 1937 to 1939.

Mr. PLUMLEY. In connection with this matter of distribution, in it fair to assume that the expense incident to this item is maintained at about an average cost with or without respect or regard to distribution, or will that increase as the years go by? Will officer who become entitled to more pay have an effect upon this particular project in the years to come, and will this grow or will it stabilize somewhere along the line?

Admiral COXARD. This is an expense involved in the transportation of officers and enlisted men from point to point. As the number of officers and enlisted men in the Navy increases, this particular expense moves with it almost in steady proportion.

Mr. PLUMLEY. It goes higher and higher ? Admiral ('Oxard. Higher and higher. Captain W TROUS. It will continue to go higher as the size of the Navy increases. There is only an increase from 4,849 lots to 5,665 lots. That is not disproportionate, I think, considering the increase in the personnel of the Navy.

Mr. UMSTEAD. Did I understand you to say that there were only two grades of enlisted men entitled to packing and crating?

Captain W'ATROC'S. Chief petty officers and petty officers first class. all officers and nurses.

Mr. Tuom. This item of $94,385 is to permit the performance of work deferred from 1938?

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