How to Make Money, and how to Keep It; Or, Capital and Labor

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Chamberlain Publishing Company, 1884 - Business - 499 pages

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Contents

I
9
II
21
III
34
IV
44
V
81
VI
101
VII
140
VIII
164
XVI
309
XVII
325
XVIII
343
XIX
359
XX
372
XXI
383
XXII
399
XXIII
408

IX
180
X
209
XI
226
XII
236
XIII
252
XIV
267
XV
296
XXIV
419
XXV
436
XXVI
450
XXVII
473
XXVIII
490
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 235 - Build to-day, then, strong and sure, With a firm and ample base ; And ascending and secure Shall to-morrow find its place. Thus alone can we attain To those turrets, where the eye Sees the world as one vast plain, And one boundless reach of sky.
Page 44 - Molten, graven, hammered and rolled ; Heavy to get and light to hold ; Hoarded, bartered, bought and sold. Stolen, borrowed, squandered, doled : Spurned by the young, but hugged by the old, To the very verge of the church-yard mold ; Price of many a crime untold ! Gold ! gold ! gold ! gold...
Page 121 - Talent is power; tact is skill. Talent is weight ; tact is momentum. Talent knows what to do; tact knows how to do it. Talent makes a man respectable ; tact will make him respected. Talent is wealth ; tact is ready money.
Page 356 - Remember that credit is money. If a man lets his money lie in my hands after it is due, he gives me the interest, or so much as I can make of it during that time. This amounts to a considerable sum where a man has good and large credit, and makes good use of it.
Page 111 - Industry all easy, as Poor Richard says; and He that riseth late must trot all Day, and shall scarce overtake his Business at Night; while Laziness travels so slowly, that Poverty soon overtakes him...
Page 357 - He that murders a crown destroys all that it might have produced, even scores of pounds. Remember that six pounds a year is but a groat a day. For this little sum (which may be daily wasted either in time or expense unperceived) a man of credit may, on his own security, have the constant possession and use of a hundred pounds. So much in stock, briskly turned by an industrious man, produces great advantage. Remember this saying, "the good paymaster is lord of another man's purse.
Page 110 - He that hath a trade, hath an estate ; and he that hath a calling, hath an office of profit and honor," as poor Richard says ; but then the trade must be worked at, and the calling well followed, or neither the estate nor the office will enable us to pay our taxes. If we are industrious, we shall never starve ; for, " at the working man's house, hunger looks in, but dares not enter.
Page 115 - Marshal thy notions into a handsome method. One will carry twice more weight trussed and packed up in bundles, than when it lies untoward flapping and hanging about his shoulders.
Page 110 - He that hath a Trade hath an Estate, and He that hath a Calling hath an Office of Profit and Honour ; but then the Trade must be worked at, and the Calling well followed, or neither the Estate, nor the Office, will enable us to pay our Taxes.
Page 107 - The longer I live, the more I am certain that the great difference between men, between the feeble and the powerful, the great and the insignificant, is energy — invincible determination ; a purpose once fixed and then death or victory.

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